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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Thursday I was on a city street coming to a red light. I stepped on the brake but the car didn't respond like it normally does, it kinda kept on going! I ended up about 3/4 a car length over the stop line thinking to myself, did I put enough pressure on the pedal?

From then on I didn't really get much over 35mph around town and each time I gently applied the brakes they seemed to work OK; just a tad mushy.

That same night about 10pm (no traffic) I'm coming off a free ramp that almost parallels the freeway (no curve to it) but drops right into downtown city street (25mph). I apply the brake and, whoa! The pedal gently goes to the floor. The car slows OK, but not well at all.

Before I go 5 blocks I'm noticing I have to pump the brake but still must plan way ahead to have enough room to stop.

On my way home it got so bad I had to shift to 2nd and 1st before applying the brakes. They'd work but were sooooo mushy.

I made it to my house. Oh, about 3 miles from my house the WARNING: CHECK BRAKE FLUID message was displayed. I'd say that was a bit too late!

I looked under the car. I could see fluid dripping from somewhere behind the drivers rear wheel. I couldn't tell exactly where it was coming from but with a mirror I could see it wasn't coming from the connect at wheel.

The brake fluid reservoir was just about empty!

Friday I drove it (again!) to a brake shop that is 4 blocks from my house. I'd filled the reservior but that didn't seem to help. I had my flashers on with the tranny in LOW gear the whole distance. I'm sure the morning commuters didn't appreciate my snail's pace. :mad:

Bottomline: Part of the metal brake line somehow wore itself through from rubbing on the frame over the past 80,000 miles. It seemed it would've been hard to do the way it was routed but apparently whenever that wheel bounced up pretty hard it would hit the brakeline.

Here's a picture. What amazes me is the hole was no more than 1/64" in diameter, maybe less!

Click here for a bigger picture than the one attached below:

http://dana60.com/rickko/STS/brakeline.jpg

..rickko..
 

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rickko said:
Thursday I was on a city street coming to a red light. I stepped on the brake but the car didn't respond like it normally does, it kinda kept on going! I ended up about 3/4 a car length over the stop line thinking to myself, did I put enough pressure on the pedal?

From then on I didn't really get much over 35mph around town and each time I gently applied the brakes they seemed to work OK; just a tad mushy.

That same night about 10pm (no traffic) I'm coming off a free ramp that almost parallels the freeway (no curve to it) but drops right into downtown city street (25mph). I apply the brake and, whoa! The pedal gently goes to the floor. The car slows OK, but not well at all.

Before I go 5 blocks I'm noticing I have to pump the brake but still must plan way ahead to have enough room to stop.

On my way home it got so bad I had to shift to 2nd and 1st before applying the brakes. They'd work but were sooooo mushy.

I made it to my house. Oh, about 3 miles from my house the WARNING: CHECK BRAKE FLUID message was displayed. I'd say that was a bit too late!

I looked under the car. I could see fluid dripping from somewhere behind the drivers rear wheel. I couldn't tell exactly where it was coming from but with a mirror I could see it wasn't coming from the connect at wheel.

The brake fluid reservoir was just about empty!

Friday I drove it (again!) to a brake shop that is 4 blocks from my house. I'd filled the reservior but that didn't seem to help. I had my flashers on with the tranny in LOW gear the whole distance. I'm sure the morning commuters didn't appreciate my snail's pace. :mad:

Bottomline: Part of the metal brake line somehow wore itself through from rubbing on the frame over the past 80,000 miles. It seemed it would've been hard to do the way it was routed but apparently whenever that wheel bounced up pretty hard it would hit the brakeline.

Here's a picture. What amazes me is the hole was no more than 1/64" in diameter, maybe less!

Click here for a bigger picture than the one attached below:

http://dana60.com/rickko/STS/brakeline.jpg

..rickko..
It happens, and thank God not too often. That's why the front and back brakes are seperate. If 1 fails you still have the other axle. Unfortunately if it's the fron that goes, the stress usually blows out the back not long after. The lines are just as old and not designed to stop the whole car, just help the front. For anyone with a mind to, go get a couple feet of fuel line. And very carefully, cause I don't want yelled at for slippage and finger cuttage, cut it into about 2" lengths, then cut it lengthwise so it's a curled up flat peice, now crawl around under the car looking for pinch points and bends that shove it into anything else. CAREFULLY put a peice of the hose around the line with thw slit side away from the frame, or whatever. Carefully because it's old line and it doesn't like being disturbed. But this will stop the rubbing and insulate it from impact.
Bob
 
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