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2009 CTS-V (Blue Diamond Manual/Recaros/Nav/Suede/Polished)
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I've searched everywhere and cannot find the answer to a simple question:

How much brake fluid is in the CTS-V brake system? I searched everywhere and cannot find a consistent answer. The factory service manual is no help either.

Also, for those that have flushed, how much fluid would you expect out of each bleeder before "new" stuff comes out if you are flushing. I assume the right rear inner will take the most, and the left rear inner the next most, followed by the 2 front inner and finally all the outer (yes, I know that is not the bleed order).

I think I will just use ATE Super Blue since then I will know when I've got all the old fluid. I tried doing Motul 600 over the weekend, and I really couldn't tell if/when the new stuff came out. I ended up using about 2 liters (~2 quarts) (stupid metric bottles...) and am still not certain.
 

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09 Cadillac CTS V
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I bleed about every 6 months with Motul 660. I use about 2 bottles, and it is easy to tell when the fluid is flushed. The color change is dramatic from the used fluid. If you don't mind investing a small amount of change, the Motive pressure bleeder, makes the job a snap, and I can completely flush fluid in about half an hour.
 

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You will need 2 x 500mL bottles to do a brake system flush. However, make sure you have a third bottle on hand in case additional bleeding is needed. Multi-piston calipers have lots of "nooks and crannies" for stubborn air bubbles to get trapped in.

The method that works best for me is to manually flush the system, drive the car around on rough roads for a few miles, then do a quick touch-up burp at each bleeder. Many times, the quick road trip shakes any errant air bubbles loose and up to the bleed screws. The reward is a very solid pedal -- especially if you have also upgraded to stainless steel braided brake lines.

While some may like the convenience, I do not recommend pressure bleeders (at least those without isolation diaphragms). We spend good money on "dry" brake fluid that is packaged in pure nitrogen -- no moisture and very low dissolved air content, so I would rather not force moist, atmospheric air into the fluid at 10-15 PSI from new. Manual bleeding insures the dry boiling point stays at the advertised figure longer.

Chris
 

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2009 CTS-V (Blue Diamond Manual/Recaros/Nav/Suede/Polished)
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys, this makes me feel better. I could see a color diff but I wasn't sure if that was all the old fluid, or just the dirtiest of the old fluid.

I have the Motive bleeder and love it. I also have a BMW adapter so I can use it to prep my wife's car for the track day too. I also got their bleeder bottle. Makes flushing pretty easy (aside from knowing when to stop).

I wonder how much is really absorbed in the few minutes its under pressure? Any chemists out there? I needed the power bleeder anyway since it looks like that's the only way to do the BMW (silly Germans--they also want the stock fluid replaced every 2 years...which is why GM uses Dot 3 instead of 4).

What stainless braided lines are people using? I had debated doing that at some point.
 

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I wonder how much is really absorbed in the few minutes its under pressure? Any chemists out there? I needed the power bleeder anyway since it looks like that's the only way to do the BMW (silly Germans--they also want the stock fluid replaced every 2 years...which is why GM uses Dot 3 instead of 4).

What stainless braided lines are people using? I had debated doing that at some point.
How much? Depends on ambient humidity, pressure and time. But any at all is not good if using the more expensive fluids.

BMW mostly uses DOT5.1, which is a higher temp version of DOT4 (but with a higher borate ester content). Some of their DOT4 fluids would actually pass the DOT5.1 test criteria. DOT3, DOT4 and DOT5.1 are all hygroscopic, so they should all be changed every two years, especially if the vehicle still has the OE rubber brake hoses. Just because GM doesn't call for the change does not mean it should not be done.

For some of the best lines available, I prefer Goodridge. 45+ years of experience, major motorsports involvement and TÜV-approval is hard to beat. And they are assembled and tested right here in the USA.

Chris
 

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Had 2009 V, Red/Blk 2016 Now
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Any ideas on the Speed Bleeders too? I looked, but couldn't find them yet.
 
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