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Was I missing something?

1590 Views 28 Replies 9 Participants Last post by  orconn
Last evening my wife commandeered my usual TV to watch the red carpet parade at the Academy Awards. Since I was to lazy to move away from this situation, I happened to catch several of the interviews with this year's batch of lovelies. Now maybe it was "lowT" or some other health issue but I found the women on display to be in the "nice looking, but no cigar" category rather than the "vava-voom!" category of some years past. Now I am no avid watcher of this annual Hollywood public relations fest, but on those occasions when I have sat through at least part of these usually hum-drum affairs I have at least been titillated by some pretty fine looking women. Not so last night, it was one lady after another who looked as though she had forgotten something, something to perk up her otherwise dull dress or in some cases "misadventures" in fashion.

I am not fan of the snotty Lara Spencer ( recently re-elevated from the "Antiques Roadshow" to "Good Morning America." but I have to admit she was about as good as it got last night. For goodness sake, some of the male talents mothers were better turned out and made a better impression than the lackluster candidates for Oscars!

After about half an hour of this mediocre show of Hollywood's pulchritude I got back on the web hoping that my pulse would get back up to normal.

I was interrupted about 10:30 EST when my wife came in to tell me an old friend, Hal Needham, had been honored with an Honorary Oscar" for his lifetime contributions to the industry. About time, he was the most profitable Director in Hollywood during the late seventies and most of the eighties. His movies may not have been artistic triumphs, but they sure raked in the cash and didn't cost much to make. A lot people don't know of all the technical developments that he either developed or underwrote, not just in the area of stunt work but in the areas of camera platforms and lighting. So my congratulations to Hal, an honor much deserved!
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Back in the mid to late 1980's Hal Needham and his company were clients of mine. My firm represented the company on Wall Street and provided investment banking and investor relations services as the company became publicly traded. As a consequence I met with him and his personal staff on a weekly basis over a three year period. During these times at his office on Cahuenga Blvd many of his fiends and cronies from the motion pictures industry dropped by (such as Dom Delouise (sp), Bert Reynolds, Jackie Gleason, and my favorite Chuck Yeager etc.) and I got to know some of them and have lunch with them on occasion have lunch with them. I enjoyed working with Hal and found him to be a very down to earth fellow whose word was as good as it gets. This period of the eighties was when Hal had come off the commercial film successes of earlier in the decade and was still owner of Bandit Racing with Harry Gant as its' driver. I met Harry a few times and got his auto graph and "Bandit" decals for my 9 year old son. Hal had a large and distinguished group of friends, as you can imagine, and the company's annual meetings were, as they say, "star studded!"

Although I was raised and lived around many industry people, my company specialized in emerging public companies in the fields of natural resources, medical technology and high technology, Hal's company was the only "Industry" (entertainment) company I ever represented. But I have to say working with Hal on his company's development was an interesting and pleasant experience.
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Hey, Cadillac_fan, tell us what you really think!
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What do you mean "used to be?" It seems to me that the last twenty years of under regulated and unenforced environment, which lead to financial crisis of 2008, is continuing unabated .... morality and the "common good" are strangers and the barbarians sit on the thrones and rule with impunity!

I entered the business back in the 1970's when all the "onerous" regulations put into effect to counteract the greed and stupidity that had brought us the "Great Depression" still ruled the day. I watched as the succeeding administrations rescinded these regulations, despite the clear evidence, the savings and loan scandal leading the way, that left unregulated and unenforced the financial community would always put the short term making of a buck ahead of those actions best for the common good of the community and the nation. Next came the insider trading scandals and the rise of some Wall Street firms from the status as "bucket shops" to the Wall Street "petty elite." Milken and his ilk got off very easy and have continued to work the financial world illicitly for there own personal gain.

The American public for the last forty years has failed to recognize that it is their money and their pockets, in the form of their pension funds and retirement investments, that these crooks are savaging for their own personal gain. The American voter has continued to ignorantly laud and vote for politicians who have dismantled the checks and balances that kept the wolves from Wall Street's hen house, and not only opened the doors but patted the robbers on their shoulders (all the while collecting a pittance in bribes to look the other way). We can't blame any one party or administration; they have all been guilty of either ignorantly removing the regulations that protected the rest of us from the marauding few!
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Bureaucracy (of any kind) leads to uniformity of perceptions and actions. When bureaucracies evolve into institutions "group think" replaces individual morals and ethics. This is true not just of corporations but also of our government institutions, the only thing that saves institutions from committing crimes against the common good are regulations. But regulations without sincere and adequate enforcement only encourage the "group think" to believe they can get away with corrupt acts. It all starts with CYA (cover your ass) and becomes institutionalized corrupt practices which eventually destroy the institutions value to society.

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^^^ So much for that toot!
Karl Marx said "Religion is the opiate of the masses," today he would most likely say "Entertainment, in all its commercial forms, is the opiate of the masses!"
Critics of the entertainment industry always like to point to the income of the handful of "stars" at the top, the so called "power' that these individuals supposedly wield, and granted the perception of these things far exceeds reality .... it always seems to be forgotten that what power people in the industry have (and I think the public exaggerates the reality of this) and the amount of money that these few make is directly dependent on the attention that the public at large gives them. Without box office cash flow their huge salaries would not exist and without willingness of a large part of the public's interest(and consumption of their press coverage) in these people's views outside of the area of expertise would be of no consequence. It is the American and international public which has made the entertainment industry what it is. When all is said and done the entertainment industry is just that, a business. Without all those who are willing to spend their hard earned money to support the life styles and give credence to the industries "celebrities" it would be what it really is just a conglomeration of small businesses.
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^^^ Thanks for your "first hand" account, Koz!
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