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Cadillac STS 3.6 2006
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There was also an International number, did you try that one? What about the link to the "contact" form? Did you try that?
My English is not good enough to dare to call an international number, but I have written an email to Andersen and Martini who are importers of Cadillac in Denmark.
 

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08 STS4 V8 1SG & 04 SRX4 V8 & 01 Monte SS
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4,988 Posts
There’s gotta be something more to it than just the radio having a power loss.
My battery has been pretty damn dead several times in the last couple months.
To the point where voltage was so low during startup that the adaptive cruise system doesn’t work until you reboot the car. I’ve even lost some nav preferences that have been saved for years in this latest event.
Low enough that the door popped open but the lock / unlock button on the door didn’t work because the power consumed from opening the door dropped voltage that low.

but I still have a clock.
I run in dual map 3D mode on main map with car direction up on map and mini map in North up at different zoom levels.
I started car on Saturday and mini map mode was off and it was set to 2D nav with north up.
I’m the only driver of this car. It lives in the garage 6 of 7 days a week and is driven about 2 hours a week for the last year probably, maybe longer.
The gps icon is pretty much always on indicating it can’t find satellites but that never really seems to prevent it from tracking me properly when there is little reason for the cars internal tracking aids to be able to handle the changes.

If I go into the diagnostic screen showing connected satellites I still see plenty connect and the date / time shown from the satellites in this screen is perfectly accurate.


Yes I took this photo a few weeks ago.
 

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06 STS-V & 06 STS 4 (sold 2016)
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From all the reports it's caused by the battery being completely disconnected for at least several minutes.

If you're fast about it, or if your battery isn't completely gone you might be alright.

The best the rest of us can do is have a temporary power source if we have to disconnect the battery. The problem is convincing a mechanic or dealer to not disconnect it for safety when they work on your car.

Stupid problem!
 

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08 STS4 V8 1SG & 04 SRX4 V8 & 01 Monte SS
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I get where you're coming from, I just have a hard time believing that is the real cause.
It certainly doesn't explain how the GPS info screen is still reporting a date/time that was accurate when i took the photo, if the ability for the car to understand the GPS time signal was corrupted this screen wouldn't have that time listed.

Consider a loss of my Nav preferences but still kept correct time ? seems quite strange, one would think that the internal to the nav battery would have to be dead for there to be a loss of saved preferences which typically never change vs a clock that is alway changing.

Also, there are those here that claim there is no battery inside the Nav unit (nobody has proven this either way, but logic dictates there would be a CMOS type coin battery in it somewhere).
 

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2006 STS V8 AWD, '95 Ford Ranger
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28,957 Posts
Typically, current solid state logic circuits require 5Volts to operate. if the NAV supply voltage doesn't drop below 5V it probably won't lose the date even though most other stuff in the car won't work.
 

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05 Stealth Gray CTS-V, 08 Light Platinum SRX V8, 05 White Diamond STS4 V8 1SG
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What does that screen show for people who have no clock?
 

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I get where you're coming from, I just have a hard time believing that is the real cause.
It certainly doesn't explain how the GPS info screen is still reporting a date/time that was accurate when i took the photo, if the ability for the car to understand the GPS time signal was corrupted this screen wouldn't have that time listed.

Consider a loss of my Nav preferences but still kept correct time ? seems quite strange, one would think that the internal to the nav battery would have to be dead for there to be a loss of saved preferences which typically never change vs a clock that is alway changing.

Also, there are those here that claim there is no battery inside the Nav unit (nobody has proven this either way, but logic dictates there would be a CMOS type coin battery in it somewhere).
I know Carter's explanation is hard to believe (especially if this blog is new to you), but, people have been experiencing and discussing this for months now. This happened to ALL of the units at basically the same time.... ONLY those who have had to disconnect their battery for one reason or another. (I fell into this category, when the dealer (unwittingly) disconnected my battery before the GM TAC folks told them not to.

In a nutshell, it is a programming error by Denso. The unit does not understand the full range of the 10 bit Epoch that just rolled over from 1111111111 to 0000000000 a couple of weeks ago. Keep in mind, this has happened to scores of cars at the same time. Also keep in mind, that GM has acknowledged the problem (PIT 5652A - but does not have a fix yet).

My best short term hope is finding a work-around, as a few people on this blog have had their clocks (magically) return (with the wrong date and time, but settable). If we can figure out the circumstances for those that "got lucky", it may just help us all.....
 

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08 STS4 V8 1SG & 04 SRX4 V8 & 01 Monte SS
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I know its hard to believe if this blog is new to you, but, people have been experiencing this for months now. This happened to ALL of the units at basically the same time.... ONLY those who have had to disconnect their battery. (I fell into that category, when the dealer (unwittingly) disconnected my battery before the GM TAC people told them not to.

In a nutshell, it is a programming error by Denso. The unit does not understand the full range of the 10 bit Epoch that just rolled over from 1111111111 to 0000000000 a couple of weeks ago. Keep in mind, this has happened to scores of cars at the same time. Also keep in mind, that GM has acknowledged the problem (but does not have a fix yet).

My best short term hope is finding a work-around, as a few people on this blog have had their clock come back (with the wrong date and time). If we can figure out the circumstances for those that "got lucky", it may just help us all.....
Don’t worry it isn’t a new “blog” for me. I’ve been following this issue since it was reported.
I’ve seen claims of people losing the clock without disconnecting their battery.
Even reports of the clock being back to those that lost it and it being gone again later.
 

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2007 STS N* and a 2003 Deville
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I live in canada and i have exactly the same problem no clock adjustment plus my gps takes an eternity to find the satellites and sometimes it does not at all
 

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06 STS-V & 06 STS 4 (sold 2016)
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I'm sure the GM and Denso engineers are reading this thread every day and are working very hard on a fix for us because they care a lot about brand loyalty. Just thought I'd crack myself up on a Friday evening after a crappy day at work. :bonkers:

Have I ever mentioned that I've been very tempted by another car maker's performance sedan recently? Days might be limited with the Lac(ers)?
 

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2009 STS 1SG, 2013 SRX
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225 Posts
In a nutshell, it is a programming error by Denso. The unit does not understand the full range of the 10 bit Epoch that just rolled over from 1111111111 to 0000000000 a couple of weeks ago. Keep in mind, this has happened to scores of cars at the same time. Also keep in mind, that GM has acknowledged the problem (PIT 5652A - but does not have a fix yet).

My best short term hope is finding a work-around, as a few people on this blog have had their clocks (magically) return (with the wrong date and time, but settable). If we can figure out the circumstances for those that "got lucky", it may just help us all.....
If it is a programming error, why do many of these units correctly understand it is 4/19/2019? If the error is tied directly to the rollover, every unit with the same code base should have went back in time 2 weeks ago.
 

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06 STS-V & 06 STS 4 (sold 2016)
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Because it looks like the Nav unit only grabs the week count at boot up. If you think about it, there's no reason it needs to read the week count after it gets it one time. All it needs is the second count from GPS to keep the time. It can't drift off by any significant amount if it keeps time from the second count.
 

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05 Stealth Gray CTS-V, 08 Light Platinum SRX V8, 05 White Diamond STS4 V8 1SG
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Because it looks like the Nav unit only grabs the week count at boot up. If you think about it, there's no reason it needs to read the week count after it gets it one time. All it needs is the second count from GPS to keep the time. It can't drift off by any significant amount if it keeps time from the second count.
I'm not sure that's how it works. From a time standpoint, I do not think our nav system continuously corrects its clock every second. In fact I think the clock is only corrected when you ask it to synchronize. That is the way it works in my CTS-V also. I didn't drive it from December to April and not only was the DST setting wrong (obviously), it was off by a few minutes and that didn't change until I forced it to sync to GPS.

Wiki has some good stuff to read also.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GPS_signals

The navigation message conveys information of three types:
- The GPS date and time and the satellite's status.
- The ephemeris: precise orbital information for the transmitting satellite.
- The almanac: status and low-resolution orbital information for every satellite.

An ephemeris is valid for only four hours; an almanac is valid for 180 days.[citation needed] The receiver uses the almanac to acquire a set of satellites based on stored time and location. As each satellite is acquired, its ephemeris is decoded so the satellite can be used for navigation.

The navigation message consists of 30-second frames 1,500 bits long, divided into five 6-second subframes of ten 30-bit words each. Each subframe has the GPS time in 6-second increments. Subframe 1 contains the GPS date (week number) and satellite clock correction information, satellite status and health. Subframes 2 and 3 together contain the transmitting satellite's ephemeris data. Subframes 4 and 5 contain page 1 through 25 of the 25-page almanac. The almanac is 15,000 bits long and takes 12.5 minutes to transmit.
Time from the nav message.
Time[edit]
GPS time is expressed with a resolution of 1.5 seconds as a week number and a time of week count (TOW).[11] Its zero point (week 0, TOW 0) is defined to be 1980-01-06T00:00Z. The TOW count is a value ranging from 0 to 403,199 whose meaning is the number of 1.5 second periods elapsed since the beginning of the GPS week. Expressing TOW count thus requires 19 bits (219 = 524,288). GPS time is a continuous time scale in that it does not include leap seconds; therefore the start/end of GPS weeks may differ from that of the corresponding UTC day by an integer number of seconds.

In each subframe, each hand-over word (HOW) contains the most significant 17 bits of the TOW count corresponding to the start of the next following subframe.[12] Note that the 2 least significant bits can be safely omitted because one HOW occurs in the navigation message every 6 seconds, which is equal to the resolution of the truncated TOW count thereof. Equivalently, the truncated TOW count is the time duration since the last GPS week start/end to the beginning of the next frame in units of 6 seconds.

Each frame contains (in subframe 1) the 10 least significant bits of the corresponding GPS week number.[13] Note that each frame is entirely within one GPS week because GPS frames do not cross GPS week boundaries.[14] Since rollover occurs every 1,024 GPS weeks (approximately every 19.6 years; 1,024 is 210), a receiver that computes current calendar dates needs to deduce the upper week number bits or obtain them from a different source. One possible method is for the receiver to save its current date in memory when shut down, and when powered on, assume that the newly decoded truncated week number corresponds to the period of 1,024 weeks that starts at the last saved date. This method correctly deduces the full week number if the receiver is never allowed to remain shut down (or without a time and position fix) for more than 1,024 weeks (~19.6 years).
That last part is kind of interesting. Obviously plenty of cars do not get a GPS signal continuously, even if the battery remains connected.

Almanac
Almanac[edit]
The almanac consists of coarse orbit and status information for each satellite in the constellation, an ionospheric model, and information to relate GPS derived time to Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). Each frame contains a part of the almanac (in subframes 4 and 5) and the complete almanac is transmitted by each satellite in 25 frames total (requiring 12.5 minutes).[15] The almanac serves several purposes. The first is to assist in the acquisition of satellites at power-up by allowing the receiver to generate a list of visible satellites based on stored position and time, while an ephemeris from each satellite is needed to compute position fixes using that satellite. In older hardware, lack of an almanac in a new receiver would cause long delays before providing a valid position, because the search for each satellite was a slow process. Advances in hardware have made the acquisition process much faster, so not having an almanac is no longer an issue. The second purpose is for relating time derived from the GPS (called GPS time) to the international time standard of UTC. Finally, the almanac allows a single-frequency receiver to correct for ionospheric delay error by using a global ionospheric model. The corrections are not as accurate as GNSS augmentation systems like WAAS or dual-frequency receivers. However, it is often better than no correction, since ionospheric error is the largest error source for a single-frequency GPS receiver.
So yeah while almanac is good for 180 days, if it doesn't know what time it is or where you are, then you have an issue.
 
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