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1989 Fleetwood Brougham d'Elegance|2018 Chevy Colorado Z71
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Discussion Starter #1
I think I'm gonna pop into my shop and start dropkicking mechanics. I'm on my way to Sears to go get a new DieHard battery since I was advised mine is gonna go soon. Now I'm very sure my carb which is new was set too high when it was put on the car because my car coasts at 5 MPH, shifts hard, and jolts when put in gear, which is just plain wrong. I'm on the highway keeping it under 60 since I don't wanna throw a rod or something because of the carb and my check engine light comes on for about 3-5 seconds then goes out most of the time when the car downshifts. This happened a buncha times during my 30 minute drive. Now my car's air pump for the emissions, the belt is disconnected because the air pump is actually slightly crooked enough that the belt had flown off and took out the other belts while the shop had it all last week. So I get to Sears and because of some whinny ass lady who wants a free flat fix because her tires are still under warranty but she ran over a NAIL!!! I DON'T think the warranty COVERS THAT! JUST A HUNCH!!!! So Sears now won't hook up my battery because it's past 7:30. So I buy the battery and just toss it in the back fighting all temptations to smash this lady in the face with it and eat my cereal tomorrow out of the bottom of her skull. I start my car it runs for like 2 seconds then dies. WILL not run. I look under the hood and for some reason the shop decided I don't need my underhood light. WTF?! So I get to the carb, on a wild ****in' hunch and examine it. The butterfly is completely vertical and won't close any farther than 45 degrees. After trying to get a tow and no one showing up I call my dad. He suggests maybe some vac lines are out, I check, nothing is disconnected. Pretty pissed now I pumped the gas 5 times and tried again. The engine ran for like 5 seconds then sputtered and died. SO I got an idea, I pumped it like 7 or 8 times, started it, and quickly put it in gear before it had a chance to stall. Completely fine. I drove it home another 30 minutes now the power steering is making that dying cat sound. I was advised my pressure hose was leaking and I was going to have them replace it next Tuesday but looks like I'll be angrily storming in there tomorrow morning and someone's getting a set of black leather boots up their asses. I am simply INFURIATED and I don't believe you should pick up a car from the shop and have a whole new set of issues!!! Tomorrow they are fixing this carb bullshit AND IT'D BETTER BE FREE!!! I'll pay for the hoses since those were about to go anyway and I wanna know why my CE light came on so many times. So sorry about the hissy fit but I needed to get that out. I would appreciate any ideas anyone has. Thanks guys, I'll bottle up my demon rage for tomorrow.

:annoyed: :rant2: :batty: :dammit: :banghead: :nono: :mad2: :bomb:
 
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DopeStar 156 said:
I would appreciate any ideas anyone has.
Well you're not gonna like this one :) and I don't say it to rile you up; just as friendly advice.

Learn to work on your own car. If you're gonna drive old cars, you need to learn to work on them in self-defense. Or, you're at the mercy of people that have no real interest in actually FIXING your car, just milking you for money at every turn.

My first car was a 1965 Impala SS, 396 with a 4-speed. Sounds great right? It was a pile of junk falling apart at the seams, but it was a bad-ass muscle car and I could afford it. I barely knew how to put gas in a car and check the tires. I hooked up with a family friend that was a very good professional mechanic and apprenticed with him for a couple years. Yeah it means you do stuff like sweep the shop, do oil changes, run for parts, etc. all for very little money but what you can learn is priceless.

Since working for him, I've done almost all my own work with the exception of really involved things like rebuilding engines and transmissions.

Good luck with your Caddy and I hope you get it all figured out without having the guys at the shop call the cops on you :)

Richard
 

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2009 CTS White Diamond base, 1992 Brougham White/White 5.7
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DopeStar 156 said:
I think I'm gonna pop into my shop and start dropkicking mechanics. I would appreciate any ideas anyone has.

:annoyed: :rant2: :batty: :dammit: :banghead: :nono: :mad2: :bomb:
I think steeltoed boots would work best. ;)

Find out if you have a shop that tells you what's wrong but will not fix anything. They offer impartial advice and don't make a red cent from fixing stuff, so you know they'll do a proper job of diagnosing the problem. And then, after the work is complete, they'll usually check the work for free. The place I know of in my town will even go to court if you take things up legally with the shop.
 

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'80 Fleetwood Coupe, 1994 and 1995 Mercedes 140 Coupe
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Same disclaimer: Please take this as friendly advice. Someotherguy is 100% correct. Shops are in business to make money, not to fix cars. I am familiar with a certain area of New Jersey and most of the shops there for the last 25 years. I used to work part time in an auto parts house and got to know who the bozos were. All the mechanics who were honest and cared about quality of work are long gone in that area. The guys who don't know how to fix anything but are "good businessmen" are still there. Most small time outfits have been replaced by chain stores like Poop Boys, Badyear and Snears due to the Gasoline suppliers squeezing them out. Some chain outfits do quality work but some turn out terrible work and continue in business. They pay their people on comission and when they don't sell you something they don't make any money.
Bottom line is that you will lose your shirt if you don't learn how to do your own work.
The upside is that you have a car that is relatively easy to repair. Parts can be had cheaply and there are several competent folks here who worship your car's fuel system:worship: Best of luck.
 

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I agree, learn to work on it yourself. I learned all that I know now on my own, from when I turned 16 and realized that it was $30+/hr labor, now over $100 at some dealers!!! Screw that! Most shops are a ripoff.

Sounds like a major vacuum leak and the ILC is trying to jack the idle up to compensate. Check for all lines, especially brakes and PCV for cracks. Old (Olds...) cars need the lines replaced eventually and careless mechanics often break them. Or hook them up wrong. They are mostly kids who know nothing but talk big enough to get them hired. Very few are truly trained mechanics who I would trust. Look at the salary of the mechanic, Maybe $10-12/hr. Think they will work for that with school training? Doubt it.

Drop the car by my place and I will take a look. SE WI nearby for you? I know the 307 well. A lot of shots with a digital camera might help if you want us to all take a look.

Get a FSM and go through the driveability and emissions section on the troubleshooting charts, it pretty good. Get some older FSM's too, they charts are valuable. 1976 Olds FSM is one of my favorites. Lots of good diagnosis. Covers Chevy 350, Olds 350/455, Buick 231, and Chevy 250. As well as THM425, THM400/THM375, THM375B/THM350, THM200 and the stickshifts of the year. And most GM rear ends that existed, many of which are still in service today (8.875 Pontiac which is in the 77-up Cads), the 8.5" Chevy, the 7.5" GM (Chevy?). Most of the braking systems used across GM till 1974-1996 in RWD cars. It is just an all around awesome reference book.
 

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1970 Sedan deVille hardtop
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Another vote for learning how to do it yourself. Far cheaper, and much more rewarding.

The 'butterfly' you were talking about sounds like the choke flap. Was it up on top of the carb? If so, then it should be vertical if the engine is warm. Go out on a cold morning, pump the gas once and look at it - it should be all or mostly closed.

Oh, and you also need to learn patience with other people it seems. If I had a tire warranty, I would expect it to cover flats from nails - it's NOT like I ran over the nail on purpose. But, ou have to accept that, sometimes, things just aren't going to work out for you. There was another person there before you, so you've gotta wait untill she's done to get service. This isn't anything personal, but even if you think she is the biggest moron on Earth (she might have been, I dunno) - DON'T waste your time getting hot under the collar. It won't help anything, and you'll only make yourself frustrated and raise your blood pressure needlessly.
This also plays into learning to do work yourself. If you had your own tools, you could have just gotten the battery, headed through the checkout and installed it yourself whether it was 7:30 or 1:30am. Being able to have some self-sufficiency is great because it can help things work out in your favor more often.
 

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1989 Fleetwood Brougham d'Elegance|2018 Chevy Colorado Z71
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Discussion Starter #7
Yeah the butterfly is the choke flap, or barrels 1 and 2, or the butterfly I've heard it called. The codes from the CE light indicate the O2 sensor. Which seems to link up everything that's gone wrong. Also the PS problem was they left the cap unscrewed off the PS fluid and the pressure hose was leaking. Had that fixed and the O2 sensor will be in tomorrow.
 
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