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Discussion Starter #1
I'm moving an 80", 113 lb. TV from one room to another. I bought an articulated mount that allows a 24" extension and when I went to install it, I find the wall has 24" stud spacing. Been in this house 33 years and every other wall I've checked had 16" spacing. The mount requires 16" spacing.

Options that come to mind:

  1. Buy another expensive mount (1f 24" stud types exist) and try to sell this one. Online store isn't open today yet but expect return unpractical since the mount weighs over 50 lbs.

  2. Cut out big section of drywall between two studs and add horizontal 2 by Xs between them where the upper and lower mounting points will be and reinstall the drywall.

  3. Bolt one end of the mount to an existing stud and use a $#!& load of the strongest drywall anchors the full width of the mount top and bottom (slots run most of the length).

  4. Bolt a sheet of something to two existing studs and bolt the mount to that sheet.
I am not confident I could do any precision cutting of wood and don't have the best tools for attempting. But maybe horizontal boards can be a little shorter than the gap between studs since I suspect they would need to be attached with some type of L brackets rather than angled screws. If I go this way what would be the lumber size to give me the most height to help this amateur hit close to center after reinstalling the drywall over it. Or better to have the widest dimension front to back and figure how to mark the drywall exactly where the boards are behind it.

Similarly, if I bolt a sheet cut to extend past two studs and taller than the mount, it would be hidden but wavy sides and other than 90 degree corners would bug me anyway. What would be the best material?

I'm worried about even a lot of drywall anchors plus one stud or a sheet of anything bolted to the wall can take the load of a 113 lb TV extended 24 inches from them. I find massive load ratings for anchors but they say those are sheer loads. I have no idea what is strong enough for that much weight on a two foot lever (other than two 2x4s studs the mount is designed for).

Option 3 would be the one well within skill set and tools.

Ideas, opinions?
 

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Use a 2x4(6/8/10 whatever you need to fit the mount), pre-drill and lag bolt to the studs (on top of drywall, unless you are going to do drywall work). Bolt the mount to that. It will be ugly when you articulate (but paint the wood to match the wall). Personally, I'd use a low profile mount, and mount the same way.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Use a 2x4(6/8/10 whatever you need to fit the mount), pre-drill and lag bolt to the studs (on top of drywall, unless you are going to do drywall work). Bolt the mount to that. It will be ugly when you articulate (but paint the wood to match the wall). Personally, I'd use a low profile mount, and mount the same way.
Thanks. Another friend suggested mounting a piece of plywood taller than the mount and wider than the 24" stud spacing. Then bolt the mount to that plywood. Don't know if plywood is strong enough to support 113 (plus weight of mount) when extended 2 feet. I mean even 3/4" plywood isn't like a 4" thick stud braced to the floor.

For that matter would those horizontal 2 bys you mentioned be strong enough? For a normal stud mounting, the shear loads are thru wood the length of the stud from floor to mount and the twisting load against 4" thickness.

Not sure how to estimate the leverage loading with 2 foot extension in either case. The mount itself is solid metal 23"x9" with bolts at 16"x7". So the horizontal boards you suggested would be 7" apart (center to center) and mount bolts 4" from the nearest stud. Just thinking out loud... So wider boards would be better with two bolts to the stud at each end farther apart. The wider, the better to reduce twisting forces. I hate the idea of adding another 2" to the distance from the wall, but no real good solution.

What I was hoping was that since all/most mounts are for 16" stud spacing, someone would make steel extensions with holes drilled at 24" spacing and studs welded on at 16" to bolt the mount to. Lots less tools and fab and only 1/8" added to TV to wall distance. But I can't find anything like that.

I really don't need anywhere near 24" extension but I like to be able to access connections on the back of the TV without squeezing my arm between the TV and wall. This 24" extension model was the only one they had for this width and weight TV (although I suspect the width of the TV shouldn't matter as long as the VESA specs are the same). Since this mount extends to 24", I need the mount to be solid enough for that even if I'd never extend it that much. This is in a guest bedroom so can't count on someone else not pulling it out that far.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
#2 but do vertical studs...

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Vertical studs usually have horizontal electrical going thru them and sometimes plumbing. Would have to cut those to get thru holes in the new stud(s) and reattach plus I think its illegal to have wire splices inside walls. Plus would have to open drywall floor to ceiling to add vertical studs, if I'm understanding.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I would NOT use drywall anchors!
Was afraid of that. They make ones that support hundreds of lbs each but that's shear, not something with 2 foot leverage.
 

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Vertical studs usually have horizontal electrical going thru them and sometimes plumbing. Would have to cut those to get thru holes in the new stud(s) and reattach plus I think its illegal to have wire splices inside walls. Plus would have to open drywall floor to ceiling to add vertical studs, if I'm understanding.
My apologies for being ignorant of housing code.

I figured you could cut a notch in the wood stud to slide it in place, then make a fitting piece to fit on the other side of the wires/pipes, slide it in place with a little wood glue. I understand the cut out from the stud would be a little small to fill the void, so make one from a spare piece of wood.

Not very good with posting pictures of what I mean so hope my English was good enough. I can't imagine a horizontal stud could withstand that kind of load...

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Discussion Starter #9
My apologies for being ignorant of housing code.

I figured you could cut a notch in the wood stud to slide it in place, then make a fitting piece to fit on the other side of the wires/pipes, slide it in place with a little wood glue. I understand the cut out from the stud would be a little small to fill the void, so make one from a spare piece of wood.

Not very good with posting pictures of what I mean so hope my English was good enough. I can't imagine a horizontal stud could withstand that kind of load...

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Now that I think about it, you're probably right about cutting a notch for horizontal wiring and pipes. Since the new stud isn't needed to support the building structure any weakness from the notch wouldn't matter.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I was surprised Monoprice decided to cover shipping if I return it. I'll do that IF I can find a comparable mount for 24" studs somewhere otherwise, keep it and do one of the above. I found two similar on paper at Amazon BUT the one with the same weight capacity has reviews with pictures showing the arms bending. Plus the hinge for tilting is at the bottom and lets the TV flop down horizontal if it loosens; destroyed one owners brand new OLED set. Another mount has better reviews but a claimed weight capacity just barely more than this TV weighs.
 

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2016 Cadillac SRX Luxury, 3.6 V6, also 2006 Pontiac Solstice base
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Late to this post, but we had the same problem with a mount I ordered for our living room. Interior wall studs are 24" rather than 16". Grrr! Returned the mount and ordered one with almost infinity-choice holes to bolt into studs.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Late to this post, but we had the same problem with a mount I ordered for our living room. Interior wall studs are 24" rather than 16". Grrr! Returned the mount and ordered one with almost infinity-choice holes to bolt into studs.
Sorry you went thru it too.

I still haven't figured out how just this one wall in the entire house (I double checked all the rest) is 24" instead of 16". I don't know if its any kind of clue but that wall is actually what would have been an exterior wall, but the house was built with an optional large bedroom over the garage so that wall became an internal wall in that bedroom.

I eventually found a mount that extends about 6" from the wall and works with 24" studs. As I said this situation didn't need extension other than for ease of access to back of set and this is enough.

It turned out I thought I had another issue with the new TV. Both have the same VESA which uses the upper and lower most holes on the mount so no vertical adjustment possible. But the 80" Visio TV had the VESA holes near the top and the 86" LG has them near the bottom. So, the new TV sits much higher on the wall. Since the mount is inset into the wall between two 16" studs, it wasn't practical to relocate the mount.

But we like it higher:

592982


For reference that light/fan control to the left is 4' to the top. I'm 5' 11" and can barely bend one finger joint over the top of the set. Looks to be the same height as the top of the doorways down that hall.

Was glad I could retain the ability to pull the TV out about 30" and turn it almost perpendicular to that wall.

I still haven't remounted the sound-bar. Putting it on the wall would be fine from a sound standpoint but I had it mounted to the bottom of the Visio TV instead of the wall so there were no visible wires running to the sound bar (which would have been excessive when the TV was pulled away from the wall). The new TV doesn't lend itself to a DIY sound-bar mount within my skill set.
 

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Sorry you went thru it too.

I still haven't figured out how just this one wall in the entire house (I double checked all the rest) is 24" instead of 16". I don't know if its any kind of clue but that wall is actually what would have been an exterior wall, but the house was built with an optional large bedroom over the garage so that wall became an internal wall in that bedroom.

I eventually found a mount that extends about 6" from the wall and works with 24" studs. As I said this situation didn't need extension other than for ease of access to back of set and this is enough.

It turned out I thought I had another issue with the new TV. Both have the same VESA which uses the upper and lower most holes on the mount so no vertical adjustment possible. But the 80" Visio TV had the VESA holes near the top and the 86" LG has them near the bottom. So, the new TV sits much higher on the wall. Since the mount is inset into the wall between two 16" studs, it wasn't practical to relocate the mount.

But we like it higher:

View attachment 592982

For reference that light/fan control to the left is 4' to the top. I'm 5' 11" and can barely bend one finger joint over the top of the set. Looks to be the same height as the top of the doorways down that hall.

Was glad I could retain the ability to pull the TV out about 30" and turn it almost perpendicular to that wall.

I still haven't remounted the sound-bar. Putting it on the wall would be fine from a sound standpoint but I had it mounted to the bottom of the Visio TV instead of the wall so there were no visible wires running to the sound bar (which would have been excessive when the TV was pulled away from the wall). The new TV doesn't lend itself to a DIY sound-bar mount within my skill set.
All of our interior walls are 24" - which messes up towel bars in bathrooms, etc. Fortunately, we have in-wall/ceiling speakers in our living room, which just led to another project of how to effectively hook them up - lots of trial and error sorting out the mass of wires poking out of the wall. The thing about where the brackets attach to the TV, affecting the height, struck us last year, too. We got a 65" TV to replace a 55". I was worried about where it would hang because pictures were hung above the TV. Turns out both the old and the new TV had the holes toward to the top, so no problem.
 
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