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1995 STS
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34 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Last pass at the track some how I snapped two studs to one of my front wheels. After 1 to 2nd shift car developed bad front end vibration and when I slowed down I heard the two lug nuts bouncing around under the center cap.
I have never had to change a wheel stud before and can't find any info on how to do it. Anyone have any tips? Its a 95 STS
 

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2000 Dev, 94 FW (crushed), 96 FW Limo (sold), 95 SLS (sold)
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367 Posts
Often on a front wheel drive you have to buy a complete wheel bearing/hub assembly.
 

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94 Eldorado, and a 99 ETC
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3,887 Posts
Wheel studs are easy.

- Remove tire
- Remove brake caliper
- Remove rotor
- Hammer stud through the hub
- Put new stud in hole (through the back of the hub)
- Use a lugnut and some washers (they make a tool for this which makes it easier) to pull the stud through
- Reassemble brakes
- Put wheel back on and torque properly
 

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'03 STS 122K, '01 STS 161K - 3/3/11
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671 Posts
I would use an old lug nut on the end of the stud when you are hammering it... If you mushroom the stud, it will not fit through the hub. Make sure there is room to remove/install studs without taking the wheel bearing off... we did this on my dads 300M and they just fit if you had the hub just right.
 

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2002.5 F55 CORSA STS, 2014 Explorer XLT FWD
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I would be more inclined to use a press or huge C-clamp than a hammer.
 

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2006 STS V8 AWD, '95 Ford Ranger
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Studs break in the first place if the lug nuts have been insufficiently tightened. The studs flex back and forth and finally break like bending a paper clip in two. A torque wrench is your friend. Beating around on the hub with a hammer can brinell the wheel bearings.
 

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2002.5 F55 CORSA STS, 2014 Explorer XLT FWD
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..............You better be ready to explain the metallurgy/stress term "Brinell" in short order.
 

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04 Deville, 11 DTS Premium, 00 Deville (sold), 02 Deville (sold)
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Sub, you underestimate the ability of the average Cadillac Conesuer.

Actually by making indentations on ones wheel bearing by hammering on the hub... one should be able to calculate the hardness of the metal using the following the formula conceived by Dr. Johan August Brinell.

 

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2002.5 F55 CORSA STS, 2014 Explorer XLT FWD
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.............connoisseur.........ain't Google wonderful ???

(and I ain't no cone sewer, either...............)
 

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2006 STS V8 AWD, '95 Ford Ranger
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I didn't intend to start a fight with a simple statement.
 

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1996 Seville SLS
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Sub, you underestimate the ability of the average Cadillac Conesuer.

Actually by making indentations on ones wheel bearing by hammering on the hub... one should be able to calculate the hardness of the metal using the following the formula conceived by Dr. Johan August Brinell.

In theory yes, but reality no. You can't measure the force applied with the hammer with typical home tools, nor is the ballpeen part of the hammer the same as the steel (or carbide) ball used in the actual test.
 

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'03 STS 122K, '01 STS 161K - 3/3/11
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He is not saying the hammer is anything like the ball in the TEST. The test never came up. He is saying that you will change the hardness of the bearing race with the blows to the studs. The high force impact, and the small contact area (point contact in theory) between the balls and the races will cause you to cold work the metal in the bearings, thus raising the BRINELL HARDNESS of the material. Not a good thing.

Sometimes the thing you are hitting with the BFH is not the only thing you have to worry about damaging. Pulling the bearing and pressing the studs out would be a much "safer" idea. Depending on miles on the bearing, I would probably just pull it and install a new bearing, which comes with new studs.
 

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1996 Seville SLS
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He is not saying the hammer is anything like the ball in the TEST. The test never came up. He is saying that you will change the hardness of the bearing race with the blows to the studs. The high force impact, and the small contact area (point contact in theory) between the balls and the races will cause you to cold work the metal in the bearings, thus raising the BRINELL HARDNESS of the material. Not a good thing.

Sometimes the thing you are hitting with the BFH is not the only thing you have to worry about damaging. Pulling the bearing and pressing the studs out would be a much "safer" idea. Depending on miles on the bearing, I would probably just pull it and install a new bearing, which comes with new studs.
He was implying that one can figure the hardness of the material from the size of the indentation created if you measured it. Which unless you can measure the force from the hammer, which not many home shops are set up to measure impact force of what you are beating the crap out of something with a hammer.
 

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'03 STS 122K, '01 STS 161K - 3/3/11
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This thread was never about measuring the hardness of anything... He was obviously not totally literal in his statement, it was meant to create a visual image.

After re-reading your original statement, it's actually kinda funny how far off base you were.

PS.... you'll need more than a ball peen hammer to get a lug out.
 

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Damn spell check.... yes, google is a wonderful thing... boy did we ever get off topic.

So we have established that beating a stud out with the hub installed on the car or in any other way that would put any type of load on the bearings or race is probably a bad idea. Using a press to remove and install the stud would be ideal.

If you do decide to attempt the hammer method... the worst that could happen is you end up replacing the hub if the bearings or ABS sensor or damaged.

P.S. The best prices I have seen on Timken hubs is at Amazon of all places.
 

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1995 STS
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34 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Wow... Im very confused now, haha, so the best bet is a press which I do not have so I will try my giant c-clamp I use on the calipers. Wish me luck, tomorrows project if the rain holds out.
I never went and re-checked the the lug nuts after I replaced the brakes a week ago, never forget to do that again!!!
 

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94 Eldorado, and a 99 ETC
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I have to agree that a press or C-clamp is a better method; however, I have done it, and seen it done with a hammer countless times with no ill effects. There isn't (or at least shouldn't be) anything capable of putting such an indentation on a bearing roller inside of the bearing. Besides, even if you whack it hard with the hammer, it's nothing compared to how much force is applied to the bearing when you take your 4000 pound car over a pot-hole. The bearings are pretty tough; they can survive a hammer pretty well. Maybe not a 10 pound sledge, but you get the point.
 
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