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Hello everyone i stay in Syracuse ny. This will be my first winter with my 2020 xt5 tying to figure out if i should get winter tires for the truck or not.
 

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Is it awd or fwd? I assume it is currently on all-season, not summer-only type tires?

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YES, get winter tires. AWD or FWD doesn't matter. Where you are you get snow and slush and ice. Similar, although we get it worse, to where I live.
Maybe your all-season, which really AREN'T all-season, they are really 3-season, tires might seem ok if you have AWD. They might keep you moving forward sufficiently. But in ice or any moderately slippery condition 3-season tires do not perform nearly as well as winters. It's the stopping that's the big issue. A winter rated tire will stop dramatically sooner than non-winters on slippery roads. And accidents happen when trying to stop most of the time but can't on time. And don't cheap out on low cost winters. They will last a long time, you'll get you money's worth out of them and extend the life of your 3-seasons. I run only Nokian Hakkapeliitta's, YouTube them, they are pretty much the best out there. If you don't buy those then there are some other top end winters that perform very well.

Going back to the all-season topic. If it is truly an all-season then it has to have the mountain / snowflake logo on it to rate it as a winter, there are a few of these, but certainly not the ones that come stock with any GM vehicle. These winter rated all-seasons are not even close to as effective as a true winter. If it doesn't have a winter rating on it specifically it's not all-season, it's 3-season, and not even close to a winter tire.
 

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My 2020 AWD XT5 came with Michelin Primacy Tour A/S. They do not have the mountain/snowflake logo, but do say M+S. I am assuming they are not true all-season, but perhaps an all-season imposter with the A/S label.
 

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I think it depends on where you live. Chicago is known for some particular tough winters, but is relatively flat. I found the OEM tires are great for our area. However, I could imagine that if you lived in areas like the Rockies, with large inclines, you would definitely want to get some dedicated snow/ice tires, perhaps Blizzaks, which are fantastic.
 

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Sorry, has nothing to do with terrain. Has everything to do with stopping on ice or slush. Watch the Youtube video comparisons, most of them are done on lakes, never on hills. It's all about stopping traction. Last year I was confronted with a 60 car pileup and the road was clear but had black ice on it. I was able to stop my car before the pile up while many around me kept sliding right into it. Luckily I was able to maneuver around it and get out before I was piled into it all by cars behind me. By time the pile up was done over 80 cars collided the news reported. I was not one of them and I am 100% sure that my winter tires on my CTS saved my bacon as I watched others keep slamming into the pile.

In Northern Ontario where I am there is an extraordinary amount of big pickup trucks on the roads. Most of these warriors with their jacked up truck don't need winter tires because they have massive aggressive treads. Wrong. Those aggressive treads are great for off-roading and mud, not snow and ice. And every year I watch as those big trucks pass me on the highway and end up in the ditch down the road. Every year without fail. It takes just a bit of research to learn the facts about winter tires and only one incident where they save you and you will be a believer for life. Some provinces in Canada it's the law to run winters.

The entire tire tread design and rubber compound is totally different on winters. I keep referencing my CTS, sorry, but the XT5 is my wife's. With my CTS in a massive snow storm last year I ploughed through the street's like nothing. everything else without winters could barely move. But my AWD CTS with Nokian winters felt like there was nothing in my way. In fact I started going off the tire tracks in the road to see how well it would do and my only problem was my front air dam was filling up with snow that I was ploughing in front of me. The snow was up to the bottom of my grill. Without winters I would not have been able to do this.
 

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Im pretty sure an xt5 only comes on all season tires. If it did have summer-only, then by all means get another set of wheels, another set of tpms sensors, and a set of blizzaks, x-ice, whatever.

If it is fwd, then you probably live where conditions never get bad enough to warrant either awd or winter tires.

If you have survived prior Syracuse winters on all season tires, there is nothing special about an xt5 that would require you to start running dedicated winter tires, again assuming its not equipped with summer-only tires now.

I have navigated a great many winters in the lake-effected areas of the great lakes and never felt a need for winter specific tires, but I do buy the best available all seasons or all-terrain choices. Ive had good luck on Michelin pilot sport as3 and heard nothing but praise for vredestein quattrac pro. Running Continental dws06 now, all very capable when paired with awd and various abs/traction/stability systems. If I had a car that was worthy of summer-only tires, I'd simply park it for winter. If i had a winter ride i was never going to drive at temps above 50 F, I'd probably try a set of dedicated winters. Otherwise, top quality all season tires will probably serve you fine. It's an xt5, not v-series or a rally car and syracuse is not Anchorage or even Buffalo
 

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Sorry, has nothing to do with terrain. Has everything to do with stopping on ice or slush. Watch the Youtube video comparisons, most of them are done on lakes, never on hills. It's all about stopping traction. Last year I was confronted with a 60 car pileup and the road was clear but had black ice on it. I was able to stop my car before the pile up while many around me kept sliding right into it. Luckily I was able to maneuver around it and get out before I was piled into it all by cars behind me. By time the pile up was done over 80 cars collided the news reported. I was not one of them and I am 100% sure that my winter tires on my CTS saved my bacon as I watched others keep slamming into the pile.

In Northern Ontario where I am there is an extraordinary amount of big pickup trucks on the roads. Most of these warriors with their jacked up truck don't need winter tires because they have massive aggressive treads. Wrong. Those aggressive treads are great for off-roading and mud, not snow and ice. And every year I watch as those big trucks pass me on the highway and end up in the ditch down the road. Every year without fail. It takes just a bit of research to learn the facts about winter tires and only one incident where they save you and you will be a believer for life. Some provinces in Canada it's the law to run winters.

The entire tire tread design and rubber compound is totally different on winters. I keep referencing my CTS, sorry, but the XT5 is my wife's. With my CTS in a massive snow storm last year I ploughed through the street's like nothing. everything else without winters could barely move. But my AWD CTS with Nokian winters felt like there was nothing in my way. In fact I started going off the tire tracks in the road to see how well it would do and my only problem was my front air dam was filling up with snow that I was ploughing in front of me. The snow was up to the bottom of my grill. Without winters I would not have been able to do this.
No you're not. Let's hit your points. If you think black ice or other severe conditions never occur in mountainous areas, and terrain has nothing to do with it, you are not well equipped for this discussion. The fact is, terrain has a ton to do with how such conditions occur, to what degree, and how frequently they arise. It's the sudden thaw / freeze cycles, that is MORE prominent in elevations, that causes black ice. To suggest terrain has nothing to do with it is ridiculous.

Second, I am very familiar with your neck of the woods, my wife being from Parry Sound and her family scattered between there, Sudbury and North Bay. We have a family cottage out on Georgian Bay and frequent the area during the summer AND winter, so I experience the roads up there alot, primarily towing toys in both seasons. I would never compare Northern Ontario anywhere near in the same league as Vail and Breckenridge, which we also frequent. I find that Northern Ontario tends to stay pretty consistently well below freezing and is less prone to black ice than the Rockies by an enormous margin. No doubt it does happen from time to time all rust belt areas, but to suggest you've got the most treacherous conditions up there, suggests that to me that you don't get out much.

The fact is, the need for, and the level of equipment that is appropriate is totally a function of where you live, terrain, the conditions that are common in the area, and how good of a driver you are. I do agree that it's best to plan for the worst, but I have yet to ever run into an issue running the OEM tires while towing in the winter anywhere in Ontario. The Rockies, yes, and I use our fully outfitted Rubicon there. EOD.
 

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No you're not. Let's hit your points. If you think black ice or other severe conditions never occur in mountainous areas, and terrain has nothing to do with it, you are not well equipped for this discussion. The fact is, terrain has a ton to do with how such conditions occur, to what degree, and how frequently they arise. It's the sudden thaw / freeze cycles, that is MORE prominent in elevations, that causes black ice. To suggest terrain has nothing to do with it is ridiculous.

Second, I am very familiar with your neck of the woods, my wife being from Parry Sound and her family scattered between there, Sudbury and North Bay. We have a family cottage out on Georgian Bay and frequent the area during the summer AND winter, so I experience the roads up there alot, primarily towing toys in both seasons. I would never compare Northern Ontario anywhere near in the same league as Vail and Breckenridge, which we also frequent. I find that Northern Ontario tends to stay pretty consistently well below freezing and is less prone to black ice than the Rockies by an enormous margin. No doubt it does happen from time to time all rust belt areas, but to suggest you've got the most treacherous conditions up there, suggests that to me that you don't get out much.

The fact is, the need for, and the level of equipment that is appropriate is totally a function of where you live, terrain, the conditions that are common in the area, and how good of a driver you are. I do agree that it's best to plan for the worst, but I have yet to ever run into an issue running the OEM tires while towing in the winter anywhere in Ontario. The Rockies, yes, and I use our fully outfitted Rubicon there. EOD.
A True Dedicated Winter Tire will ALWAYS be the best tire in Winter Conditions. The Rubber Material is Softer and will ALWAYS do better in COLD conditions. ICE, better, SLUSH, better, SNOW, better, WET just above freezing, better.

but....

Warm weather you will eat through them quickly... Swap when the Temp average is <50 your good to go.... my 2 Cents... :)
 

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Exactly. The forementioned Blizzaks are so soft, and with extreme siping, you can litterally wear them out in one summer in the heat. But in the winter, they are a beast. Again, if the area dictates the need for dedicated winter tires, by all means do it. However, unless your area is known for tough winters, I think most would agree that the AWD XT5 does pretty well with the OEM all seasons. I think this one has been sufficiently beat to death.
 

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Hello everyone i stay in Syracuse ny. This will be my first winter with my 2020 xt5 tying to figure out if i should get winter tires for the truck or not.
I live in Syracuse also. I have used Bridgestone Blizzards for the last 40 yrs on all the Cadillacs that I have leased. With the snow and ice conditions we get I would not go a winter season without them . I have a set all mounted on extra wheels and I will be getting ready to swap my tires over pretty soon.
 

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A True Dedicated Winter Tire will ALWAYS be the best tire in Winter Conditions. The Rubber Material is Softer and will ALWAYS do better in COLD conditions. ICE, better, SLUSH, better, SNOW, better, WET just above freezing, better.
Someone who knows, thank you.

but to suggest you've got the most treacherous conditions up there, suggests that to me that you don't get out much.
Such an ignorant comment. I travel all over for work across Canada, mostly in remote areas up north, and across the US dude so chill. Just cause you want to be the guy who has no problems with 3-season tires except in the Rockies, ok then. Winter tires are NOT made just for treacherous terrain, but sure I will agree, if you are in mountains in the winter you would be crazy not to have winters on. Quite frankly anyone arguing that winter tires don't perform significantly better in ANY below freezing condition does not know what they are talking about. If you don't want to use them great for you. But don't make up fake facts. We don't get a lot of black ice huh. Please. we sit at -15C or colder most of Jan and Feb. On clear pavement the exhaust from cars instantly freezes to the road. Do you even understand how that happens? Making an uneducated comment. On almost any freezing morning as I just described there will be areas of black ice on clear roads before the sun heats it up by mid morning.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
My 2020 AWD XT5 came with Michelin Primacy Tour A/S. They do not have the mountain/snowflake logo, but do say M+S. I am assuming they are not true all-season, but perhaps an all-season imposter with the A/S label.
That's is what mine are also have you had them in the snow yet if so how did it handle
 

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I live in Syracuse also. I have used Bridgestone Blizzards for the last 40 yrs on all the Cadillacs that I have leased. With the snow and ice conditions we get I would not go a winter season without them . I have a set all mounted on extra wheels and I will be getting ready to swap my tires over pretty soon.
Mine comes with the factory 20 in im think about get some 18 in steal wheel. I know the xt5 comes in 20 and 18 in rims
 

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That's is what mine are also have you had them in the snow yet if so how did it handle
I took delivery in July. The first experience with snow/ice will be here soon.
 

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One interesting observation- you could add awd to the vehicle purchase for about the cost of a good set of winter tires, rims, & tpms sensors.

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I hesitate to post because we'll likely disagree as to how to interpret the results but this was well done.
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The test should have been done with FWD (Front Wheel Drive) for the two wheel with winter tires. That is the combination predominant in the US. Anyone who has a two wheel drive pickup with rwd will throw at least a couple hundred pounds or more of bagged sand in the box over the drive wheels. With an empty box and rwd, a pickup is very poor in winter driving.
 

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A couple of AWD XT5's would have been ideal for this test. The winter tires could have been tested (mounted on the front) in Touring mode which is FWD. Another XT5 could be added with winter tires on all four corners which is probably the way most would equip their vehicle.

The other XT5 could have all-seasons mounted on all four corners and run the test in AWD mode.

That would be an interesting comparison to set expectations for FWD with winter tires vs AWD with all-seasons.
 

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Someone who knows, thank you.


Such an ignorant comment. I travel all over for work across Canada, mostly in remote areas up north, and across the US dude so chill. Just cause you want to be the guy who has no problems with 3-season tires except in the Rockies, ok then. Winter tires are NOT made just for treacherous terrain, but sure I will agree, if you are in mountains in the winter you would be crazy not to have winters on. Quite frankly anyone arguing that winter tires don't perform significantly better in ANY below freezing condition does not know what they are talking about. If you don't want to use them great for you. But don't make up fake facts. We don't get a lot of black ice huh. Please. we sit at -15C or colder most of Jan and Feb. On clear pavement the exhaust from cars instantly freezes to the road. Do you even understand how that happens? Making an uneducated comment. On almost any freezing morning as I just described there will be areas of black ice on clear roads before the sun heats it up by mid morning.
Lol, Poor Philly. Nobody said dedicated winter tires are not superior in the snow and ice - and in fact, I clearly stated they are great. I spoke very highly of the Blizzak's I've used in the past. Further, if the conditions in your area suggest they make sense, definitely get them. Who said otherwise? What are you arguing about?

However, if the OEM All-Season tires will handle everything you normally see in your region, why deal with the hassle of investing and storing a second set of tires? If you don't get incremental value out of the investment, and the added capability is not leveraged, the ROI is ZERO. I told you in Chicago, my wife never has had a single issue with the stock all seasons, period. If YOU think YOU need them, due to your local conditions or driving skills, that's cool. By all means - YOU need them. I've driven 10's of thousands of miles over the last thirty years in your area towing snowmobiles and I don't find it particularly treacherous. You apparently do, so use them.

That said, I'm not sure if you are paying attention, but the XT5's are not equipped with 3 season tires as you claimed. Across the board, they all got ALL-Season tires. You do know the difference, right? So when you talk about 3 season tires as part of your argument, again, it kind of undermines your credibility. You be you, and stop worrying about judging others.
 
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