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Discussion Starter #1
Im considering switching from conventional oil to synthetic in my recently acquired 2000 STS, 37,000 miles.

The motor was broken in on conventional but multiple sources say its OK to switch over to full synthetic.

Any suggestions.:banana:
 

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I dont think there is any benefit...... do a search, we went into GREAT detail about this earlier.......

If you arent a racecar driver and you change your oil regularly, no sense in switching!
 

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Save your money and use the oil that the car was designed to run on! SYNTHETIC IS A WASTE OF MONEY!
 

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There shouldn't be any leaks, unless the car has much higher mileage. We've concluded on my synthetic thread that new Corvettes recomend it. I've switched back and forth with a few of my vehicles and didn't REALLY notice much difference. However one reason I'll use it in the winter is because according to Mobil 1, "pumps at

-45 for fast oil supply." If you live in a warmer climate I would not worry too much.
 

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Synthetic IS superior to dino in most (if not all) performance catagories. The question is, does your driving style and/or local climate suggest that it would be the better oil for you. In the testing I've done over the years, I've found that the synthetic's advantage is mainly at the two extreme ends of the temperature scale. It absolutely protects your engine better in extreme temps, and definately provides superior "cold-flow" charateristics.
Bottom line: The synthetic IS better but a good quality dino WILL do the job for MOST applications for far less money.
 

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Save your money and use the oil that the car was designed to run on! SYNTHETIC IS A WASTE OF MONEY!


Just in case you missed the point!


__________________
 

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If you are concerned about cold flow characteristics, just use 5w30 instead of 10w30......
 

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I know you are supposed to use 5w, but most independent lube stores put in 10w (i guess that is what most car mfgs have called for)....... At least the one I go to does!

It was the idea........ INSTEAD OF USING 10w30, USE 5W30....... MEANING TO USE A THINNER OIL IN THE WINTER!

So if youre supposed to use 5w, use 0w........
 

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Most new cars recommend 5w 30, but our climate changes and even during the winter it can warm up for a few days at a time. 10w30 is thin enough for winter (for me) but for summer I personally would not use 5w30, too thin on hot days I've heard for the older cars.

Question, for all these little new cars, the manufacturer recommends 5w30 even in the summer. For my car they recommend 10w30 for all season, but you can use 5w30 in winter if you want. I guess my question is what makes my v8 overheat with 5w30 in sumer and not the new Acuras, etc with a 4 banger?
 

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elwesso said:
I know you are supposed to use 5w, but most independent lube stores put in 10w ....... At least the one I go to does!
You mean.....You don't change your own oil?......I'm ashamed of you Wes!
 

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Ok..... I have only done 1 oil change (i have only had the car for about 1500 miles), and my dad agreed to do its first oil change, and have it inspected...... They replaced the belts at the same time......... But I promise, it wont happen again :D
 

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Ralph said:
Most new cars recommend 5w 30, but our climate changes and even during the winter it can warm up for a few days at a time. 10w30 is thin enough for winter (for me) but for summer I personally would not use 5w30, too thin on hot days I've heard for the older cars.

Question, for all these little new cars, the manufacturer recommends 5w30 even in the summer. For my car they recommend 10w30 for all season, but you can use 5w30 in winter if you want. I guess my question is what makes my v8 overheat with 5w30 in sumer and not the new Acuras, etc with a 4 banger?
The only reason they recommend 5w is because of the EPA and all the federal regulations for gas mileage...... They dont really care if 10w does a better job at protecting the engine, so they use 5w because it gets better gas mileage (supposedly, you probably couldnt really tell anyway)........ But back when your car was made, they didnt really care about the feds (or the regulations werent as strict)..........

I dont think that your car will "overheat" due to the use of thinner oil.........
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Well, I live in Missouri. We see cold winters and hot summers so synthetic may not be a bad idea. Another concern: I am away from home for extended periods of time, up to 4-6 weeks. I try to have someone drive the vehicle occassionally but sometimes it is not possible. Will the synthetic help in that situation (extended periods of non-use).
 

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njgeno said:
I am away from home for extended periods of time, up to 4-6 weeks. I try to have someone drive the vehicle occassionally but sometimes it is not possible. Will the synthetic help in that situation (extended periods of non-use).
Yes, I think it does. It leaves a nice coating on everything that doesn't drip off as easily as the fossil stuff does. Supposedly it helps to protect better during cold starts.
 

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Ahh, the synth vs. fossil debate. This puppy rages all the time, every time. :)

I personally use synthetic in all my vehicles (cars and motorcycles). The reasons for using synthetic in a bike (ALWAYS USE SYNTH) are really different for cars.

When it comes to cars, synthetic is a choice. If you change your oil regularly, your not on WOT all the time, you don't race or street drag or hit on it most of the time, then you can use a good fossil oil. The non-uniformity of the particles in those oils are not as much of a factor when the engine is run well under it's curve.

Basically, dino oil is made of different oil molecules of different sizes. Oil lends itself to form chains of molecules of any size. When dino breaks down, the bigger molecules get theirs first, then slowly the rest of it goes under chemical change... but because the molecules are of different sizes, the oil has a shorter lifespan- the point before the oil doesnt provide enough lubrication.

Synthetic on the other hand is more resilient to breakdown. It takes more heat over more time to break down the molecules, and on top of that, they are all exactly the same. Synthetic lasts longer because there is more useable 'lubrication' per se, over fossil oil.

In motorcycles, this is important because the clutch, transmission, crank, and cylinders are all lubricated from the same thing: engine oil. Motorcycles can't handle additives, and that oil is getting used for all sorts of things.. so it breaks down quicker.

However, since cars just use oil for the engine, the oil doesn't experience the same type of conditions. Hence, you can get away with using dino. The only thing that you would need synth for is when your pushing the car's envelope; when you run the engine closer to it's optimum efficiency (max HP), your also making it do the most work, and create the most heat- this breaks dino oil down fast.

So.. to sum it up: Synth is for bikes and also for cars that are driven like race cars, or for lazy-asses who don't want to change their oil every month. Dino is for everyone else driving a car. ;)

I use synth because I drive like a race car driver (peak HP giving RPM off the line, optimum cruising speeds, etc..). I'd be dead without a tach. :D

:cheers:
 
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