Cadillac Owners Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
2003 STS w/BoseNav, 1993 Deville, 1985 Deville
Joined
·
1,089 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
What is the intermediate shaft?

I got the car back today from Warranty work at the dealer. The service order says:

Check for clunk noise from front of vehicle while driving.....Replaced the steering intermediate shaft with new design for clunk noise....

I brought it in because I could hear and feel a clunk when I hit small bumps when going slow. Also, when turning the wheel from lock to lock while car is stationary, I could hear and feel the same clunk.

When I got the car back today, I didn't notice the clunk anymores.

T
 

·
Registered
2011 cts coupe
Joined
·
46 Posts
There is a small shaft between the steering columm and the rack and pinion , most cars have a small u-joint that is non-greasable if the joint is bad it will clunk.
 

·
Registered
2003 STS w/BoseNav, 1993 Deville, 1985 Deville
Joined
·
1,089 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Ah...very good. Thanks for the info, tony99sls, I hope the problem stays away.
 

·
Cadillac Technician
none
Joined
·
11,051 Posts
Technically the problem isn't the joints.
While I agree that is a fair description, there are actually two universal style joints on the "I-shaft" in question.
The source of the problem is actually not in the joints but in the "slip joint".

See the shaft is made of two pieces, one smaller one that goes in and out inside the other. The problem is the interface between the inside part and the outside part (picture a power antenna mast, two sections with one that slides inside the other).
They are splined to eachother, but you get excess play inbetween the splines and what happens is the shaft actually twists inside the bigger one under various load conditions, as the wheels are turned and absorb shock from bumps in the road that shock is transferred into the I-shaft and where there is too much play you get a "clunk".
I know that's almost as clear as mud, and the previous description was semi-accurate but I just thought I'd clarify.

I'll see if I can find an image of one.
 

·
Registered
2003 STS w/BoseNav, 1993 Deville, 1985 Deville
Joined
·
1,089 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Ahhhh. I remember now. I think that's done for two reasons. One, to allow movement between the body and the supension. Two, to prevent the steering wheel from ramming the driver in a head-on collision.

Your description is a good one. Thanks, ewill3rd.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top