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Registered
05 CTS-V
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23,162 Posts
ah Sal....welcome to my world. ask the V boys, I am the king of sound deadening. In fact I did our Denali, which is your truck's cousin.
I began here:
http://www.cadillacforums.com/forums/cadillac-cts-v-series-forum/47239-sound-deadening-trunk-pics.html
http://www.secondskinaudio.com/ Aquire some second skin damplifier PRO.
Then I changed companies to here:
http://www.cadillacforums.com/forums/cadillac-cts-v-series-forum/63848-sound-deadening-interior-tearout-faq-pics.html
http://www.raamaudio.com/cgi-bin/index.cgi
(yes all my pics are dead)
I changed since damplifier was so expensive. The RAAMmat was cheaper but stuck like a mother! I applied Raammat and Ensolite (over top of the damplifier/dynamat) to most of my car...doors, trunk, rear seat, shelf. Then i did UNDERside of my car and yet the raammat is sticking there perfectly. Then i did the doors and rear of the 'nali.

How quiet do you want? How much money you got? I must have over 500 ft of this stuff on my car. I have a wisp of muffled wind noise from the A pillars. Time, money, desire to rip your cars guts out...what do you want?

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Registered
2012 Escalade, 2014 SRX
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13,353 Posts
You can have sound proofing installed throughout your truck by a good stereo shop, it will not be cheap but it will work. If you want your Caddy to ride softer then get an STS. ;) It's a truck. :)
 

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Cadillac Maniac
Cadillac Escalade
Joined
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13,753 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Well I'm liable to take the truck apart and never get it back together again. So my best bet would be to have a stereo shop do it. They can do more than just stereo stuff, right? About what might it cost to get the whole vehicle done? It would really be nice to have it very quiet in there...

As for the suspension. Yeah, I know.. It's a truck.. But there must be a way to soften it up a little bit.. I wouldn't mind sacrificing some handling for a smoother ride...
 

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Registered
2005 Escalade
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159 Posts
What tires are you running and what inflation? It's tempting to bump the inflation up to get better gas mileage, but the ride usually suffers. If you have the stock 17" tires, keep the inflation at 30 to 32 PSI unless you're going to load the truck or tow something. Not all tires ride the same, some are harsher than others. Places like Consumer Reports and The Tire Rack rates tires for ride quality. You may want to check out changing tires before you try changing the suspension. Tire selection can also have a big affect on your noise issue.
 

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Cadillac Maniac
Cadillac Escalade
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13,753 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks.. My tires are currently 35 and 36 PSI. Would dropping them to 30 PSI make a noticable difference? Next time I'm outside, I'll make a note of what brand of tires I'm using...
 

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Registered
2005 Escalade
Joined
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159 Posts
Thanks.. My tires are currently 35 and 36 PSI. Would dropping them to 30 PSI make a noticable difference? Next time I'm outside, I'll make a note of what brand of tires I'm using...
If you're running 17" tires, dropping the pressure will make a BIG difference. If you're running 20", 35 PSI may be the correct pressure. There is a placard inside the driver's door frame that gives the correct pressure for the OE tire size. The recommended pressure is usually a good compromise for ride and fuel economy. But you can adjust pressures depending on what you are doing. If you're on rough roads at lower speeds, lower your pressures. Highway travel on good roads or towing, raise your pressure. If you're flying, make sure the pressure is higher. Don't exceed the max pressure for the tire, that invites blow-outs, smashed wheels, etc. Always set the pressure when the tire is cold or ambient. As you use the tire, it will heat up and the inflation will build, which is normal.
 

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Registered
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319 Posts
Thanks for the advice on the tire pressure.. On the other hand, I'm still curious about what it might cost to have the sound-proofing done...
Depends on how excessive you want to go. If you don't have a sound system then I would focus most of the deading up in the front of the car unless you really care about the rear seat passengers. Doors, fenderwells, firewall, floor, hood will pretty much cover the front. You can get the peel and stick stuff which is super easy to work with or the sludgy stuff which is cheaper but smells like a$$ and a pita. What really helps is adding a second layer of lead based deadening ie extremliner...man that stuff does wonders in getting rid of road drone but it's not cheap. For a decently deadened car (including install because most of the work is done taking apart and putting your car back together) will cost $1000-1500. Probably a days worth of work.
 

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Cadillac Maniac
Cadillac Escalade
Joined
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13,753 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the pricing information.. So I would definitely want to go with whatever doesn't smell bad. A second layer as well.. But I'd like to do the entire SUV. I'm more interested in my passengers comfort than mine... So for all that - I'm probably looking at like $3k, huh? This may be a good time to make use of a credit card...
 

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Registered
2005 Escalade
Joined
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159 Posts
Lord Cadi,

Something you may want to try, undercoating. It used to be applied mainly for rust prevention, but another benefit was sound reduction. You don't want the thin stuff, but a good thick coat installed by a reputable firm that will thoroughly clean the underside and cover with multiple layers. You would need to tell them why you want the undercoat. Some companies also apply a rust preventative to door cavities, etc, but I don't know what affect it may have on sound transmission. These products won't be nearly as effective as the sound deading material that has been talked about, but it won't cost anywhere close to the numbers that have been talked about.
 

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Cadillac Maniac
Cadillac Escalade
Joined
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13,753 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Lord Cadi,

Something you may want to try, undercoating. It used to be applied mainly for rust prevention, but another benefit was sound reduction. You don't want the thin stuff, but a good thick coat installed by a reputable firm that will thoroughly clean the underside and cover with multiple layers. You would need to tell them why you want the undercoat. Some companies also apply a rust preventative to door cavities, etc, but I don't know what affect it may have on sound transmission. These products won't be nearly as effective as the sound deading material that has been talked about, but it won't cost anywhere close to the numbers that have been talked about.
I'll definitely look into it. Thank you. :)
 
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