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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, this is my first post.

The cts-v will be my first car with a manual transmission. Ive been told by several people that I will eventually want to install a short shift. Is there a short shift kit available for CTS? Can it be adapted for the CTSv?
Thanks in advance,
John
 

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oceanhut said:
Hello, this is my first post.

The cts-v will be my first car with a manual transmission. Ive been told by several people that I will eventually want to install a short shift. Is there a short shift kit available for CTS? Can it be adapted for the CTSv?
Thanks in advance,
John


I would doubt it since it has not come out yet. However you do know that is basically the same tranny in the 5 series as in the CTS. Not that has anything to do with anything. Wait and see I doubt you would be looking for one with this car so just wait and see.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It is the same tranny as the 5 series? As in 5 series bmw?

The only reason I may be in the market for a short shift, is because all the magazines ive read have complained about a rubbery shift-- I thought this might be a remedy.
 

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oceanhut said:
It is the same tranny as the 5 series? As in 5 series bmw?

The only reason I may be in the market for a short shift, is because all the magazines ive read have complained about a rubbery shift-- I thought this might be a remedy.
I wouldn't worry about it. If its your first stick have fun with it then when you learn it beef it up
 

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The CTS automatic is the same as in the 5-series BMW.

As for the stick in the V, wait till you get it and see how the shifter feels to you, then worry about new shifters or short throw kits.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Good advice, everyone. Thanks.

I guess I am getting ahead of myself. I was joking with my roomate who is a loyal stick driver by saying that you could have told me it came with a short shift kit and I wouldnt have known anyway! HA.

Thanks again, Ill post pics when I get the car.
 

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oceanhut said:
Good advice, everyone. Thanks.

I guess I am getting ahead of myself. I was joking with my roomate who is a loyal stick driver by saying that you could have told me it came with a short shift kit and I wouldnt have known anyway! HA.

Thanks again, Ill post pics when I get the car.
Regarding aftermarket modifications - frankly, the best thing you can do is keep the car absolutely stock for the first six months. Every car has good and bad, but every quibble I've seen about the CTS-V has been trivial.

Bear in mind there's rarely ever a free lunch - you want a shorter shift? Okay, shift effort is going to increase, probably the noise and vibration level too. This is certainly true of the BMW short-shifters, some more than others. The aftermarket exists to sell stuff. Be as skeptical there as anywhere else. There's always a tradeoff, whether it's cost, NVH, effort, etc.

The Tremec T56 transmission is basically the same as that used in the fourth-gen Camarobirds and Australian Holdens, nothing like the BMW's Getrag boxes. It's been cleaned up a bit for CTS-V use, the main NVH improvement though is not in the box but ahead of it - a dual-mass flywheel. I'm hoping it gets an hydraulically-actuated clutch, too.

The most important modification you can make is to the nut behind the wheel. Find a local club that runs open-track/track school events. Preferably with a decent instructional program. BMWCCA is generally very good and many chapters are quite happy to have non-BMWs sign up, there's a variety of other clubs (NASA, TracQuest, some Corvette clubs) as well. Get out on the track, work up to speed, listen to your instructor. A few weekends of track time will be worth more than all the aftermarket parts you could ever buy.
 
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