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2014 CTS Lux - 2008 CTS DI Luxury Performance II
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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone Sea Foamed the Direct Injection Engine yet and any tips? Brake Booster line?
 

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08 White Diamond CTS DI RWD FE2 all options
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In my 30+ years of car ownership I have never ever done it. Never had need for it. Somehow I doubt if it really works.

I would advise anyone against doing it.

Just my 2c...
 

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Cadillac
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I have never done it, but GM sells what I guess is the same stuff (at least very similar), called Top Engine Cleaner. GM doesn't really sell "sham" products, so if GM does it, I would bet it works.
 

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NONE
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I agree, this is a risky thing to do IMO unless its as a last resort. I happen know of someone who did this on his 2007 Chevy truck and its not been running right since.
 

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2008 CTS 3.6L DI RWD, GMPP new engine 11/2013
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GM's recommendation is simple and straightforward: use Top Tier detergent gasoline - if unavailable and/or if engine carbon deposits arise, then add "GM Fuel System Treatment." Top Tier alone works well for me.

 

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Cadillac CT6 (2019)
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That picture of the GM fuel treatment SURE looks a lot like Chevron's fuel treatment Techron................................hmmmmm, I wonder.
 

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2008 CTS 3.6L DI RWD, GMPP new engine 11/2013
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2009 CTS AWD DI 2014 AWD CTS DI
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I have always used Techron mainly to keep injectors clean. How often does GM reccomend use of their product?
 

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2008 CTS 3.6L DI RWD, GMPP new engine 11/2013
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My 2008 CTS owner's manual says...

Additives
To provide cleaner air, all gasolines in the United States are now required to contain additives that help prevent engine and fuel system deposits from forming, allowing the emission control system to work properly. In most cases, you should not have to add anything to the fuel. However, some gasolines contain only the minimum amount of additive required to meet U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations. To help keep fuel injectors and intake valves clean, or if your vehicle experiences problems due to dirty injectors or valves, look for gasoline that is advertised as TOP TIER Detergent Gasoline. Also, your dealer/retailer has additives that will help correct and prevent most deposit-related problems.

Is that a recommendation or simply an accomodation to GM dealers/retailers?

If one chooses to use the product, then GM recommends it with each oil change and Techron still recommends every 3,000 miles which was the typical oil change interval when the original product was introduced in the 1980s.

BTW, I was in WalMart last night and found TECHRON Concentrate PLUS Fuel System Cleaner in a 10-oz longneck plastic bottle ("now treats up to 15 gallons") on sale for $5, less than one-half the dealer price of 20-oz GM Fuel System Treatment PLUS (treats up to 18 gallons). I guess that either "PLUS" product might be worth using to prevent fuel gauge sensor corrosion/malfunction ($600-$800 repair job last time I checked about 10 years ago) in vehicles owned beyond the 4yr/50K warranty period.
 

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08 White Diamond CTS DI RWD FE2 all options
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As I stated before I have never had any problems with clogged injectors or intake valves. However I always try to use the TopTier gasoline. In my wife’s car (95,000 miles on the odo) I probably ran ChevronTechron twice. For no apparent reason, just to be sure what ever deposit there might be it would be cleaned.

With my CTS with DI engine I have done it once and right now I have 39,000 miles on the odometer. Given that it is a DI engine Techron will not affect intake valves. It might help just the fuel system including injectors.

An interesting question arises – with DI engine the fuel pump supplies pressure in excess of 1,800 psi. Wouldn’t this high pressure “self clean” the injectors?
 

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2008 CTS FE3 RWD Premium Luxury White Diamond Cocao/cashmere
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I have used seafoam on older Jeep applications a number of times and it has worked well. I used it on a 1991 Comanche pickup with the first generation Chrysler fuel injection. It put a coat on my sparkplugs and my O2 sensor making them less effective so I had to replace them, but considering they were near end of life anyway it wasn't a big loss. When I bought the Jeep it had 113,000 miles back in 2005 so there was quite a bit of carbon buildup. That being said I cannot imagine 17 year newer fuel technology creating carbon buildup after such a short amount of time of use. Considering what it did to the ancient electronics in my Jeep I would not recommend using it on a newer vehicle.
 

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2008 CTS 3.6L DI RWD, GMPP new engine 11/2013
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As I stated before I have never had any problems with clogged injectors or intake valves. However I always try to use the TopTier gasoline...
Same here. So I have no concerns about engine deposits and related performance issues, period.

My only dilemma regarding the use of GM Fuel System Treatment PLUS or TECHRON Concetrate PLUS Fuel System Cleaner, which I believe to be one and the same, is this...

PRO: the "PLUS" anti-sulfur filming additive might prevent fuel gauge sensor corrosion which is potentially a costly problem that I and others have previously experienced with other vehicles. Any other claimed benefits, if real, would be a bonus.

CON: Top Tier detergent gasoline alone might do the trick. EPA Tier 2 Vehicle and Gasoline Sulfur Program drastically reduced the average sulfur content in U.S. gasoline beginning in 2007, two years after "PLUS" products were reformulated to include anti-sulfur additive. So these two "PLUS" products might now be unnecessary overkill.

...but I don't plan to lose any sleep over it. :)

...An interesting question arises – with DI engine the fuel pump supplies pressure in excess of 1,800 psi. Wouldn’t this high pressure “self clean” the injectors?
Good point. I hadn't thought of it...yet another potential CON.
 

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'05 STS V8, 1SF JE5, Lockpick, Volant CAI, Corsa, Summer 20s
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Seafoam is making a big comeback because direct injection engines do not wash the back of the valves with fuel on the intake side, it is introduced inside the combustion chamber. So an old problem is new again. Less efficient engines and cruder fuel used to carbon up engines fairly quickly. If you have the northstar or any non-direct injection engine and are running premium a can every 25K in the gas tank will keep you clean as whistle. On a direct injection engine this method is fruitless because no seafoam or fuel makes contact with the site of carbon buildup which is on the intake side and backs of valves, etc - outside of the combustion chamber. A low tech way to gauge this is to take a look at your tailpipes for carbon buildup. Direct injection engines carbon up more quickly and seafoam, or another product is a needed maintentance task in my opinion to prevent an eventual head removal for cleaning, until manufacturers take a step forward here. If used properly into a vacuum line you won't hydrolock unless you introduce the liquid too quickly, if she sputters too much, stop pouring!. There is also a spray version to vrtually eliminate this issue, but in a non-direct engine I would stick with the fuel supply option.
 

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DHS maybe a future CTS Owner
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:banghead:Save your money, buy and hamburger and a shake, you'll come out money ahead! I got sucked into trying Seafoam last year. My rational was, that since I was driving a 1986 Chevy pickup with 180,000 miles on it, it could use some carbon cleaning. Put the Seafoam in the fuel tank, and believe me, it never ran the same until the mechanic installed a rebuilt carburetor. It only cost my $650.00 to "believe in the wording in the owner's manual". Stay away from all the "snake oil" gas and oil treatments out there. After much research, the only product on the market that has any independent scientific evidence of reducing carbon buildup in the patented ingredient in Chevron fuel and its associated additives.
 

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2009 CTS 3.6 DI
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This is the reason you've seen CTS direct injection owners installing the catch cans. It seems to be an inherent design flaw in Direct Injection engines. BMW has developed a procedure referred to as "walnut shell blasting" to clean all that carbon build up off. The process essentially sounds like sandblasting the carbon build up away on each valve, one by one. From what I've read, GM suggest an "upper engine cleaning" or similar procedure to deal with the carbon build up that comes with the DI engine. Seafoam, or other chemical cleaners are one option. Running at 70 mph in forth gear for 20 minutes is another option, which is supposed to get the valves hot and hopefully knock off or burn off some of the carbon build up. The other option is the BMW type walnut shell blasting procedure, which is risky because you have to ensure that each valve that you are blasting is completely sealed so that the blasting material does not find its way into the combustion chamber, then you have to vacuum out the material. The last option is to start tearing it all down and soaking the valves.

I guess my point is, Seafoam and "Italian tune ups" seem to have the most appeal to me, at least before digging deeper into the more intrusive means. I think a catch can is in my future to help prevent any further build up. Take a look around all the different forms, pretty much all manufacturers running direct injection engines are having trouble with carbon build up. Toyota seems to be the only manufacture that is taking a combination of direct injection and port injection so that all that fuel additive cleaner comes into contact with your intake valves. If anyone has tried the seafoam, let me know!
 

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2013 CTS 3.6 V6 RWD Performance Sedan
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Used Seafoam in my 3.6 G8, no problems. Used a can in my CTS 3.0 last tank up, no problems. Another product is BKG.
 

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'14 CTS-V Long Roof; '10 CTS Long Roof; '16 ATS-V Sedan,' 04 Trailblazer 4x4
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I have used Techron in another vehicle many times with no problems. That being said, it is a waste in our DI engines.
 

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2010 CTS4 Premium Sport Wagon AWD 3.6L, Crystal Red Tintcoat
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Sorry to revive an old thread, but this thread comes up on Google for direct injection Seafoaming....

On the 3.6 DI CTS engine, the brake booster line splits in a Y: one to the manifold and one to a vacuum pump. Don't think that it is a good idea to introduce the Seafoam there.
What I think is better is to take off the top engine cover, remove the top PCV valve, find a hose that fits into the port, and then hover that hose over a cup filled with 1/3 of a Seafoam bottle. (This all with the car idling of course.)
Like this video except with the hose I mentioned above: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lRxqbu-9w4g
The engine MUST be warm when doing this. My guess is so that the liquid doesn't pool anywhere in the intake, which would lead to bigger problems if it sucks pure liquid.

Some people mention sucking the Seafoam, then turning off for 5-10 minutes to soak, then restarting. I wouldn't feel comfortable doing that just for the chance of pulling in any standing liquid, but that's just me.

Not very difficult and having a catch-can means you already have the hose leading into the top of the intake to use. Just remember to hover the hose over the fluid, the vacuum of the engine will do the work. Any sputtering means you should back off on the sucking.

Good luck to anyone who attempts this.
 
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