Cadillac Owners Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Cadillac
Joined
·
68 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
'98 Eldorado ESC. I need some help on how to change the rear brake pads actually how to get the top pin out of the caliper. I popped the cap off and using a mirror it looked like a bolt head but couldn't get any thing to fit. I changed the rears on the '93 STS I had but these are different. Any help or advice would be appreciated. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
99STS,2004 Jeep Liberty Renegade,98 Deville RIP
Joined
·
1,054 Posts
On the Deville and Eldorado the top pin is what the caliper rotates up on, once you rotate up, then pull out but if just changing pads then it just needs to be held out of the way while you insert the new pads, you will need to retract the piston by screwing it back in or as I have learned here, open up the bleeder screw if possible.
 

·
Registered
Cadillac
Joined
·
68 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Rear brake pads

I posted this earlier but it dropped off for some reason, any way I need to know how to change the rear pads on a '98 Eldorado ESC. I see the bottom bolt (pin) but there is a cap on the top where the bolt should be. I just want to replace the pads, if I take the bottom bolt out will the caliper rotate up enough to get the pads out?Also can I comporess the piston with a "C" clamp like the fronts? The '93 I had screwed in and out but these don't look like they do. Thought I would get some advise before I start prying on things. Thanks for any help.
 

·
Administrator
2002.5 F55 CORSA STS, 2014 Explorer XLT FWD
Joined
·
69,483 Posts
The rear caliper puck needs to be screwed back into the caliper. It ratchets out to take up slack in the parking brake system. As caddyshack said, rotate the caliper on the top pin, but you don't need to remove it unless you're also doing the rotors.
 

·
Registered
2003 Cadillac Seville STS 73k Miles, '90 Chevy 1500 Reg Cab
Joined
·
725 Posts
Re: Rear brake pads

Below are the instruction off Autozone's website for rear pads on your model:

1. Raise and safely support the vehicle.

2. Remove the wheel and tire assembly.

3. If the caliper is to be removed from the vehicle, remove the bolt attaching the brake hose to the caliper. Discard the gaskets. Plug the openings in the caliper and brake hose to prevent fluid loss.

4. If the caliper is to be removed from the vehicle, lift up on the end of the parking brake cable spring to free the end of the cable from the parking brake lever.

5. Remove the bolt and washer attaching the cable support bracket to the caliper.

6. Remove the sleeve bolt, pivot the caliper up to clear the rotor and then slide it inboard off the pin sleeve.

7. If the caliper is being removed only for brake pad replacement or to provide access to the mounting bracket, rotor or other components, suspend the caliper with wire from the strut.




WARNING
Do not let the caliper hang from the brake hose. The hose may become damaged, causing possible brake failure.

To install:

8. Inspect the pin boot, bolt boot and sleeve boot for cuts, tears or deterioration and replace as necessary.

9. Inspect the bolt sleeve and pin sleeve for corrosion or damage. Pull the boots to gain access to the sleeves for inspection or replacement. Replace corroded or damaged sleeves; do not try to polish away corrosion.

10. If not replaced, remove the pin boot from the caliper and install the small end over the pin sleeve (installed on caliper support) until the boot seats in the pin groove. This prevents cutting the pin boot when sliding the caliper onto the pin sleeve.

11. Hold the caliper in the position it was removed and start it over the end of the pin sleeve. As the caliper approaches the pin boot, work the large end of the pin boot in the caliper groove, then push the caliper fully onto the pin.

12. Pivot the caliper down, being careful not to damage the piston boot on the inboard disc brake pad. Compress the sleeve boot by hand as the caliper moves into position to prevent boot damage.

13. After the caliper is in position, recheck the position of the pad clips. If necessary, use a small prybar to reseat or center the pad clips on the bracket abutments.

14. Install the sleeve bolt and tighten to 20 ft. lbs. (27 Nm).

15. Install the cable support bracket (with cable attached) with the bolt and washer and tighten to 32 ft. lbs. (43 Nm).

16. Lift up on the end of the cable spring clip and work the end of the parking brake cable into the notch in the lever.

17. Position the brake hose on the disc brake caliper. Connect the hose to the caliper using the attaching bolt and 2 new gaskets. Tighten the bolt to 32 ft. lbs. (44 Nm).

18. Bleed the brake system.

19. Install the wheel and tire assembly and lower the vehicle. Check the parking brake adjustment.


You can check out the full instruction with diagrams by creating an account and adding your vehicle, I don't buy my parts from them generally but the instructions do come in handy at times.
 

·
Registered
1999 Cadillac Seville STS
Joined
·
43 Posts
First off, I LOVE this forum. It is SUPER helpful for DIY people like me who are not very familiar with their Cadillac.

I am replacing the rear brakes on my '99 STS, and learned the "hard way" about the ratching piston, as I was not able to retract the piston far enough to install my new rotors and pads. Who sells the tool to ratchet the piston rearward? It is interesting, the GM Online Service manual (available to dealers and GM employees) does not mention this bit of information. Does anyone know if the actual printed GM manual from Helms or a decent aftermarket one does?
 

·
Registered
1999 Cadillac Seville STS
Joined
·
43 Posts
Yes, I did rent the tool from a local auto parts store and figured it out. Thanks for the info, though!
 

·
Administrator
2002.5 F55 CORSA STS, 2014 Explorer XLT FWD
Joined
·
69,483 Posts
Does anyone know if the actual printed GM manual from Helms or a decent aftermarket one does?
See below ..............

Both the GM/Helm service manual and the GM manual in www.alldatadiy.com, in the Brakes chapter, Pad Replacement, give the procedure for retracting the piston 1mm, removing the pads, and then using a spanner wrench to further screw the piston back into the caliper.

First, you do the removal procedure, then ...............

"Installation procedure, pads, rear:

1. Retract the brake caliper piston (2) into the brake caliper bore. Use a spanner type wrench and turn the piston clockwise until it bottoms out fully in the brake caliper."
 

Attachments

·
Administrator
2002.5 F55 CORSA STS, 2014 Explorer XLT FWD
Joined
·
69,483 Posts
The C-clamp, used to do the only the first 1mm of piston movement, is referenced in the pads "Removal" section. The "screw it in" note is in the "Installation" section.

It is impossible to press the rear brake caliper piston all the way back in - it ratchets out as the pads wear in order to maintain parking brake cable tension. You MUST screw the piston back in.

There is a very specific note on this 1mm thing in the Pad Removal section - too long to quote and type right now.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
'99 Seville STS; '96/7 ETC
Joined
·
2,393 Posts
Now THIS is an area where I have acquired a great deal of practise, experience - & a little expertise but I'm puzzled by this 1mm bit. Presumably that's to make it a little easier to pivot the calliper, to remove the pads, to get the piston wind back tool of your choice into place - but, how is that achieved? I can't see that with everything in place, how a clamp is going to have any effect on the outer pad - or the calliper. That's not to say I won't try it, as a brake examination is coming up any day now.
 

·
Administrator
2002.5 F55 CORSA STS, 2014 Explorer XLT FWD
Joined
·
69,483 Posts
The pads/piston, even the rear piston, always moves in/out about 1 mm in response to braking action. It's supposed to retract that ~1mm or so - prevents premature pad wear - but the GM service manual is very specific as to the method of first relieving any pad pressure, pivoting off the caliper, replacing the pads, screwing in the piston.

Where most DIY owners, unfamiliar with the rear caliper mechanicals, get into trouble is when they actually use wrenches and clamps to try and push that rear caliper piston all the way in. Damage is done.

The C-clamp squashes the outer pad against the rotor, pushing the rotor against the inner pad - IF the pads are tight, that small action relieves the piston pressure.
 

·
Registered
'99 Seville STS; '96/7 ETC
Joined
·
2,393 Posts
That does confirm my thought about that first mm but I AM surprised that a clamp applied to an outer pad has any effect at all. As I've always had a bit of struggle to pivot the calliper (although no more so than on XJ40 front brakes which are very similar BUT don't wind in!) I'll be only too pleased to give it a try.

Unfortunately you have also confirmed my fear that it was my stupidity that was responsible for having to replace a calliper in the first place: those indents in the piston crown should've told me it wound in, but since buying the tool for the front brakes on a Golf (Rabbit?) many years ago, I've been away from wind in pistons (well that's my excuse)
 

·
Premium Member
1997 ETC
Joined
·
4,952 Posts
The pads/piston, even the rear piston, always moves in/out about 1 mm in response to braking action. It's supposed to retract that ~1mm or so - prevents premature pad wear - but the GM service manual is very specific as to the method of first relieving any pad pressure, pivoting off the caliper, replacing the pads, screwing in the piston.

Where most DIY owners, unfamiliar with the rear caliper mechanicals, get into trouble is when they actually use wrenches and clamps to try and push that rear caliper piston all the way in. Damage is done.

The C-clamp squashes the outer pad against the rotor, pushing the rotor against the inner pad - IF the pads are tight, that small action relieves the piston pressure.
Now that i recall, i didnt use a c-clamp for my rears, youre correct.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top