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2013 ATS 2.0
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12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, two weeks ago I had two codes P0171 and p0299 and they eventually went away. Last night I was driving on the high way when suddenly check engine light, service stabilitrak, and service traction control lights all came on. Also got an alert that said engine power reduced and speed limited. It kept saying speed limited to such and such miles and hour but I was able to go over it. I got back on the highway and once I reached 40 mph it started blogging down and it said “Engine overpower”. It then slightly stalled, but I turned off the car and turned it back on and was able to drive home going about 30 mph. This morning I got back into my car and only the check engine light was on. But it sputtered and took quite a few cranks to get started. Once started only the check engine light was on, and when I would pushed the pedal it would shake the car slightly. I’ve seen one thread with a guy that had this exact same problem but no one has responded. Does anyone have any ideas on what the problem is?
 

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2013 ATS 2.0
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12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The definitions are as follows:

P0171 - Fuel Trim System Lean Bank 1

P00C6 - Fuel and air metering and auxiliary emission controls

P0299 - turbo/super charger underboost

P228C - fuel and air metering and auxiliary emission controls
 

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Registered
2014 ATS 3.6 Premium RWD, 2016 Corvette Z06, 2018 GMC Sierra Denali 2500HD Diesel
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3,337 Posts
That is an odd set of codes. Fuel trim lean is too much air for the amount of fuel indicating that fuel trim is unable to achieve the desired mixture balance within available range while P0299 is too little boost (i.e. air) from the supercharger. You might want to search more on the P00C6 and P228C codes because a failed sensor may be causing this odd mix of codes. You are also getting into an area where you may need to consider a shop that has the tools to read the actual exhaust mixture instead of just relying upon what the engine sensors are reporting because when there are sensors and/or ECM issues then the trouble codes themselves are suspect and will lead you in the wrong direction.

I think the 2.0T has specific codes for insufficient fuel rail pressure but if the fuel pressure sensor is malfunctioning, then this could create an issue both with mixture and turbo underboost. If your code reader can show real time operating data, see what the actual and requested pressure is in the fuel rail.

With the 2.0T (or any forced induction engine) you need to be very careful with engine operation while these problems are occurring, the reduced power is the engine's ECM program trying to protect the engine and with mixture issues it is very easy to get into a set of operating conditions that will rapidly damage your engine. Your traction and stabilitrak controls are locked out because they depend upon a normally operating engine to function and won't be available until the underlying problem(s) are corrected.

Rodger
 

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2013 ATS 2.0
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12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Rodger thank you so much for your response. I actually just removed the engine cover and saw that there are hoses split. I am attaching pictures if you could help me determine what these are.
Engine Auto part Vehicle Car Fuel line
Engine Auto part Vehicle Car Fuel line
Auto part Fuel line Engine Vehicle Automotive fuel system
Pipe Fuel line Auto part Pipe insulation Hose
 

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2002 F55 STS, 2014 Explorer XLT, F-150s
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75,484 Posts
Someone with the various vacuum, fuel, and EVAP schematics will need to post them.

Or, for instant gratification subscribe the car to www.alldatadiy.com - it's the online GM/Cadillac service manuals and every diagnostic tree and schematic is in there - somewhere.

Look in www.helminc.com for the hard copy GM/Cadillac service manuals.
 

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2013 ATS 2.0
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12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
if anyone can help! I replaced that fuel line crack. Detached the battery for 30 mins and turned car back on. Now only getting 1 code P228C which I have read in a previous post that this may be related to the fuel rail pressure sensor. Does anyone have any help in locating this on the Cadillac ATS 2.0T engine. Do I have remove the left manifold to get to it?
 

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2014 ATS 3.6 Premium RWD, 2016 Corvette Z06, 2018 GMC Sierra Denali 2500HD Diesel
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3,337 Posts
Do you have all of the damaged hoses replaced? Make sure all of that is done first because the 228C may be a residual code related to those problems. Any problem in the fuel system can result in low fuel pressure from the camshaft driven high pressure pump.

There is also a GM bulletin referring to this code but I don't have a PDF for it, the TSB is 18NA072 and apparently points to a problem with the high pressure fuel pump which is going to be somewhat expensive so I would want to be sure that is the issue before replacing it.

I am not familiar with the 2.0T plumbing layout but if there was a crack in a fuel line then low rail pressure could have been from insufficient supply to the high pressure pump. I would run the vehicle for a couple of days, check performance, reset the code, and see if it returns. Your repair of the damaged line may also clear the P228C.

All of these direct injection common rail systems are fairly similar. There is a "moderate pressure" (higher pressure than the old port injected system and typically around 75 PSI) fuel pump at or in the fuel tank and this feeds the high pressure pump that is engine powered and driven via an extra lobe on the camshaft. This second pump pressurizes the common rail that feeds the injectors and rail pressure will vary based upon commanded engine performance, for most GDI engines it will be in the 600 psi range at idle and maximum will generally be in the 3000-4000 psi range at maximum power demand. Various error codes will be set if there is a large discrepancy between ECM commanded and actual measured fuel rail pressure. All will have a return network to dump fuel from the high pressure system back to the fuel tank as operating demands change.

CAUTION!!! Be extremely careful doing any work around the high pressure side of this system. In addition to the obvious fire danger, a leak in the rail will inject gasoline into the layers of the skin and this can result in gangrene. Unlike older port injected systems, you are dealing with extremely high pressure and like hydraulic systems there are detailed medical procedures for treatment if fuel is hydraulically injected into your body. You are getting into an area where unless you have a lot of experience it is going to be far better to involve a shop. There are specialized tools and techniques required for this sort of work and a learning experience can be very expensive personally and financially. It doesn't have to be a GM dealer, any good third party shop will have a lot of experience in dealing with these types of fuel systems by now. They are a first cousin to the even higher pressure systems used on current diesel engines which run at 8 to 10 times the PSI of the gas systems but the gasoline direct injection fuel systems are plenty dangerous. Basic shop safety practices for these fuel systems are very similar to those for high pressure hydraulic systems. I don't think GM uses high voltage to fire the injectors on their gas direct injection engines but some manfacturers do so that is another potential hazard when dealing with direct injection.

Rodger
 
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