Cadillac Owners Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
2005 Stealth Gray CTS-V
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Some thoughts after a recent trek from the Midwest to New England and Canada and back in my ’05 CTS-V:


-- With the exception of jarring from the F1 runflats on uneven pavement, the V is a magnificent long-distance travel vehicle. I will eventually replace the stock tires with some more forgiving. I love the cornering characteristics of the F1’s, but now am willing to compromise.

-- Gas mileage was as advertised. We averaged 23.8 mpg for the trip, which included a good bit of mountainous and in-town driving in addition to turnpike cruising.

-- The seats, with their multiple adjustments, remain comfortable during 600-mile days.

-- It’s difficult to keep from exceeding highway speed limits even when touring casually. Got a speeding ticket in Pennsylvania when, on a 65-mph four-lane highway, I pulled into the passing lane when a truck ahead slowed while climbing a hill. I was in sixth, and just gently nudged the throttle. As I crested the hill, I saw a state trooper in the median. I glanced at the speedometer and was surprised to see it reading 83. When the trooper sauntered up to my window a few moments later, his first words were, “I got you on radar at 83 miles per hour.” I’m trying to look upon the experience as an expensive speedometer calibration confirmation exercise.

-- Cruise Control is your friend. I’ve owned several cars so equipped, and never used this feature. And I certainly didn’t anticipate using it with the V! But I must admit that on long hauls on interstates, setting it four or five mph above the posted limit and letting the car monitor itself makes more sense than I previously imagined.

-- Don’t wait until you’re in unfamiliar territory to become proficient with the navigation system. Previous to this trip, I’d treated the navigation feature as a novelty. But in the midst of some unanticipated confusing roadways – like around Toronto, with its meager road signage, during evening rush hour on the Friday that began Canada’s Thanksgiving holiday weekend – I wished I could’ve more easily programmed in a destination and allowed the navigation system to guide me. Learning under fire isn’t recommended.

-- I saw only one other V during our journey – a black one (ours is Stealth Gray), in the Pittsburgh suburb of Wexford – but did encounter a few folk along the way who recognized the V for what it is. Two drivers, both in new Mustangs, tried to engage us while cruising on interstates on the way home, one in Ohio and one in Illinois. I probably would’ve schooled them had it not been for my wife’s paranoia induced by the danged ticket in Pennsylvania on the way out. The most enjoyable encounter took place on the parking lot of the Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg Museum in Auburn, Indiana (a shrine that all automotive enthusiasts should visit). When we exited the museum after a most enjoyable two hours of gawking, we found our V surrounded by four guys, ranging in age from teens to 60s, none of whom knew one another but all of whom were fascinated by seeing their first V. Although I repeatedly urged them to get inside the museum to see the magnificent vehicles therein, they insisted on spending several minutes quizzing me about the V, peering under the hood, checking out the interior, etc. They were impressed with the V, and my wife was impressed that they were impressed. She already was appreciative of the car’s creature comforts, and now she sees that my love of the V’s mechanical features isn’t goofy afterall.

Now, if only I could get 23.8 mpg zipping around the ol’ hometown…
 

·
crushing Vs with my Wurm
2013 GT500 - 700+ HP
Joined
·
12,266 Posts
great write up... and congrats on the trip, sounds excellent other than the revenue collecters gettin ya.

F
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
OzarksHillbilly said:
Some thoughts after a recent trek from the Midwest to New England and Canada and back in my ’05 CTS-V:


-- With the exception of jarring from the F1 runflats on uneven pavement, the V is a magnificent long-distance travel vehicle. I will eventually replace the stock tires with some more forgiving. I love the cornering characteristics of the F1’s, but now am willing to compromise.

-- Gas mileage was as advertised. We averaged 23.8 mpg for the trip, which included a good bit of mountainous and in-town driving in addition to turnpike cruising.

-- The seats, with their multiple adjustments, remain comfortable during 600-mile days.

-- It’s difficult to keep from exceeding highway speed limits even when touring casually. Got a speeding ticket in Pennsylvania when, on a 65-mph four-lane highway, I pulled into the passing lane when a truck ahead slowed while climbing a hill. I was in sixth, and just gently nudged the throttle. As I crested the hill, I saw a state trooper in the median. I glanced at the speedometer and was surprised to see it reading 83. When the trooper sauntered up to my window a few moments later, his first words were, “I got you on radar at 83 miles per hour.” I’m trying to look upon the experience as an expensive speedometer calibration confirmation exercise.

-- Cruise Control is your friend. I’ve owned several cars so equipped, and never used this feature. And I certainly didn’t anticipate using it with the V! But I must admit that on long hauls on interstates, setting it four or five mph above the posted limit and letting the car monitor itself makes more sense than I previously imagined.

-- Don’t wait until you’re in unfamiliar territory to become proficient with the navigation system. Previous to this trip, I’d treated the navigation feature as a novelty. But in the midst of some unanticipated confusing roadways – like around Toronto, with its meager road signage, during evening rush hour on the Friday that began Canada’s Thanksgiving holiday weekend – I wished I could’ve more easily programmed in a destination and allowed the navigation system to guide me. Learning under fire isn’t recommended.

-- I saw only one other V during our journey – a black one (ours is Stealth Gray), in the Pittsburgh suburb of Wexford – but did encounter a few folk along the way who recognized the V for what it is. Two drivers, both in new Mustangs, tried to engage us while cruising on interstates on the way home, one in Ohio and one in Illinois. I probably would’ve schooled them had it not been for my wife’s paranoia induced by the danged ticket in Pennsylvania on the way out. The most enjoyable encounter took place on the parking lot of the Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg Museum in Auburn, Indiana (a shrine that all automotive enthusiasts should visit). When we exited the museum after a most enjoyable two hours of gawking, we found our V surrounded by four guys, ranging in age from teens to 60s, none of whom knew one another but all of whom were fascinated by seeing their first V. Although I repeatedly urged them to get inside the museum to see the magnificent vehicles therein, they insisted on spending several minutes quizzing me about the V, peering under the hood, checking out the interior, etc. They were impressed with the V, and my wife was impressed that they were impressed. She already was appreciative of the car’s creature comforts, and now she sees that my love of the V’s mechanical features isn’t goofy afterall.

Now, if only I could get 23.8 mpg zipping around the ol’ hometown…

Does your wife have an unmarried sister?
 

·
Registered
CTS-V
Joined
·
534 Posts
Glad to read your report. I'm going down to Texas and will be driving my new for me V from their up to the DC area. It's about 1550 miles and I'm looking to do it in about 2.5 days (leaving TX at lunch on Friday and intending to be home by Sunday evening. Should be quite an adventure. Did this last year to get an Acura NSX. I was stupid with that one though as I did 1200+ miles in 26 hours of total door to door time. I was lucky not to have wrecked...
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top