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Discussion Starter #1
I am having problems with my 96 caddy deville. It keeps heating up on me. First I changed my fan relays cause they weren't turning fast enough,(it helped) then I changed the water pump, and its still heating up. I took the thermostat off too. Right now I am flushing the radiator, lets see if that helps. Can anyone help me out with any pointers? What are the symptoms of head bolts unscrewing themselves? could that be the problem? The car at idle wont heat up, it stays around 220F, I can leave it on idling with no problems, but if I start driving it it will heat up, and spill the water through the top overfill hose.
 

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2005 CTS-V, 1994 Infiniti Q45
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You may have some clogged areas somewhere..... most likely a cause of insuffecient cooling system maintenance...... I dont know how well those prestone radiator cleaner things work, but it may be worth a shot.....
 

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The head gasket failing..... white smoke from tailpipe, while foamy oil, coolant dripping from the side of the block......

what your describing is not the head bolts pulling.....
 

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Discussion Starter #5
ohh man, I am reliefed! Do you think it might be the radiator? I think it might be. I hope. Can you tell me which way the water should flow? From the bottom to the top? from the top to the bottom?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
ok I just finished with the flush procedure. I put the flush, ran it a while, emptied the flush, then washed out the radiator (put waterhose at reservoir let circulate through the radiator with the butterfly off. Next Im gonna fill back up and try it. (fingers crossed). ANYWAY. My question is, should I put another bottle of the bars copper flakes in it? I had put some before, but it has then drained about 10 times with all the overheating and changing of things, does it wear off?
 

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I dont know which way it flows for sure..... but whichever end is closer to the water pump you can assume that HOT water flows through there and then out the other side...... For instance, on my car, it starts out the passenger side top and ends up bottom drivers side....

also, whichever side the mechanical fan is on (unless there are 2 on the northstar, i dont know), you can assume that hot water flows in to that side.....

Dont take my word as fact, someone else will chime in that knows the northstars cooling system better than me!
 

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2005 CTS-V, 1994 Infiniti Q45
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I have heard that you HAVE to put in the coolant supplement stuff into the northstars cooling system..... I dont know for sure (it sounds like an accident waiting to happen-- an additive that stops leaks, and could potentially clog something!)
 

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2005 CTS-V, 1994 Infiniti Q45
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Also, about your flush procedure, I WOULD DRAIN IT RIGHT NOW (well not NOW, but as soon as you can), and fill it with distilled water..... the bottled stuff you get from walmart (not more than $1/gal)...... There is too many minerals in your tap water, and can actually cause MORE deposits....

Here is the flush procedure I got for my Q45

1. Drain radiator
2. Fill radiator with distilled water
3. Run to operating temp (at least enough to open tstat)
4. Let cool down
5. Repeat until clear water flows out
6. On the final refill, fill with appropriate amount of antifreeze....

I dont know about what mixture you should use, but for me the mixture is 70% water, 1 bottle of redline water wetter, and the rest AF......
 

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87 Deville
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Hello, I hope you didn't take the Thermostat out and leave it out because that would cause it to overheat. Make sure you go to Napa and buy the BEST thermostat they offer, you can get different heat ranges so your engine will run cooler, and i wouldn't add any stop leak additives of any kind either, unless recommended by your Cadillac Dealer! and lastly your engine Timing can cause it to run hot, try a different heat range on your new thermostat 1st.
 

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Use a 200 tstat..... Anything less will cause it to run overly rich......

Cadillac recommends you use the coolant stop leaks things..... I wont use them, but to each their own.....

I would change the tstat anyway...... Its about a $10 part, and it can save your engine (especially since it is very sensitive to overheating!)
 

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1994 STS - pearl white
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I have a 94 STS. FWIW, this was my experience...

Last December I had the following symptoms: 1) Check coolant level message kept showing up 2) Started overheating only while driving. It would idle at normal temp for an hour, but start overheating when driving a mile or more 3) Kept losing coolant. No external coolant leaks, no white exhaust smoke, just boiling out the overflow.

I did the repair myself. Pulled head bolt was the culprit. Head gasket blew from the combustion chamber to the water jacket right at the loose bolt. I did not have any coolant in the oil. I repaired ALL of the head bolt holes with the Time-Sert kit. It was expensive, but it was the right way to do it. It would have been ridiculously expensive to have a dealer fix it.

I have had no trouble with the engine since the repair. I drive the car pretty hard. The tach hits the redline on a daily basis. Still love the Northstar.
 

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1994 STS - pearl white
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Whoops, forgot some things...

The Northstar engine is a reverse-flow coolant design. Coolant flows from the heads down into the block, then through the long rad hose to the right (passenger) end of the rad. Right to left through the rad and then back to the water pump. In general, hot coolant flows into the rad via the higher hose neck, and cool coolant flows from the lower hose neck to the water pump.

The cooling system sealer pellets are strongly recommended/required in the Northstar engine. The effectiveness of them is lost when you change coolant or flush the system, as most of the flakes/fibers exit with the coolant. When I bought the pellets, the part counter guy said "you can use one or two (pellets), but if you put in three, I guarantee you'll clog the heater core".

The thermostat is more expensive than a standard stat because of the reverse flow design. But they are still cheap compared to the alternative.
 

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You have to take out the engine to repair the head bolts, and is not a job for the average DIYer with average tools..... You basically need the car on a lift......

One of the downsides to having the engine in sideways rather than correctly!
 

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1994 STS - pearl white
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elwesso said:
You have to take out the engine to repair the head bolts, and is not a job for the average DIYer with average tools.....
I'll take that as a compliment. It CAN be done by an experienced and/or careful DIYer.

elwesso said:
You basically need the car on a lift......
Not really... (see the attachment) I used an engine hoist to lift the car body off the powertrain.

elwesso said:
One of the downsides to having the engine in sideways rather than correctly!
And yet, one of the advantages, too - the powertrain comes out the bottom in one neat package.

If you are going to attempt this, 1) get a factory service manual (eBay or helminc.com to buy new) and 2) let me know - I've got a complete TimeSert kit that I'm done with & wouldn't object to selling & I have a design for a powertrain dolly that worked well for me.

The factory service manual recommends leaving the struts, hubs, etc in the car. I think it was easier removing them with the powertrain. When putting the TimeSerts in, if you are careful with keeping the chips under control, you don't have to separate the engine from the trans. If you let chips stray into the oil drainback holes, you need to separate the engine from the trans to get the oil pan off for cleaning out.

I'm here if you've got other questions, but I sometimes don't get to check the board for a week or more.

Good Luck.
 

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1984 Fleetwood Brougham coupe
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Damn eehoepp!!! I would love to have you as a neighbor. Its from guys like you I learn a bit about DIY. I used to be afraid to touch the gears in the rearend but my gf's bro-in-law showed me how to do some of these things. Now I laugh at my buddies who call me to help them swap out the gears. I got one of my friends to rebuild my tranny for the work I done to his truck's grs.
 

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When I said the AVERAGE DIYer, that implys the guys that will do all the maintenance stuff; stuff thats easy, doesnt take up much time, and keeps them occupoed..... They do not have all the tools and an engine hoist to do major stuff..... You, in my book, would be a "seasoned" or an "advanced" DIYer.....

And judging by his previous posts, it doesnt seem <to me> that black on black lac is up to the challenge..... It would a shame to get it partially apart and then have to get it fixed halfway through!!
 

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1994 STS - pearl white
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elwesso said:
It would a shame to get it partially apart and then have to get it fixed halfway through!!
Agreed. This is not a repair to be tackled by one who only has done oil changes and spark plugs. It is time consuming - it took me about 2 months of evenings and weekends, although that was aggravated by working in the great outdoors/in an unheated garage through February & March (note the snow in the photo).

Taking on a repair like this requires the wrencher to be very committed (in every sense of the word) and have alternate transportation for however long the repair takes. It also requires some commitment from the spouse/gf if you still want to have a relationship at the end of it all.

IMHO, if a DIYer has been able to successfully rebuild an alternator or starter motor by following the directions in a repair kit, they are capable of a repair like this. We all get started somewhere and if we don't challenge ourselves, we'll never get better. DIYers certainly don't get any pofessional training, so we have to learn by doing what we may not be 100% sure of. The DIYer has to be determined to do the whole job, whatever that entails.

FWIW, I consider myself to be an insanely serious DIYer. I've long held the view that I don't save much money by doing all repairs myself, because I end up spending some of that on tools. The Northstar head gasket repair was the exception - I know I saved thousands doing it myself (but I didn't have the funds to pay someone to do it for me anyway).

A DIYer with a decent socket set and selection of wrenches would probably have to shell out a couple hundred bucks for some bearing pullers and torque wrenches. An engine crane can be rented relatively cheap. The factory service manual is a must. Aside from these, I don't recall having to use any exotic tools for the repair.

My $0.02
 
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