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2009 CTS
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I received this via a Service Special E-mail from my dealer today. Any basis to these claims?


S
ervice Special

Nitrogen filled tires will save you $$$

• Increase fuel mileage 10%
• Increase tire life 20%
• Reduce tire failures
• Improve handling

Exchange your old compressed air with nitrogen and see the results immediately!

$39.95
plus tax
Includes 1 year membership in Nitrofill Auto Club
Auto Club Membership includes: Roadside assistance, tire replacement roadhazard, emergency travel expenses and
FREE trip routing.​
 

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1991 Sedan Deville
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The only one I know for sure is that it fluctuates less as the temperature changes. So I guess those claims could be true, do to a more constant inflation at the correct pressure.
 

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1998 Seville STS / 2013 Chevrolet Impala
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Your tires are all ready filled with 78% Nitrogen...........

Snake oil. :thehand:
 

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2019 XT5
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337 Posts
Initially, I was skeptical. My dealer apparently uses nitrogen in all their cars so I gave it a try. The car is kept in a garage at night and every time I go out and start it up the tire pressure is right on. I know that temperatures have risen, increasing pressure somewhat but it has been almost six months and I have not had to add nitrogen to any tire. So far, I am becoming a believer. We'll see what happens when temperatures fall this fall and winter.
 

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2017 ATS-V Sedan, Vector Blue/Black, 6MT
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My dealer also routinely replaces the air with Nitrogen in all of it's new cars.At first, I was not pleased, because it was going to be very difficult to find Nitrogen to keep the tires fully inflated. However, the stuff really performs as advertised. The tire pressure deviates much less with temperature than air does. This is notable even while driving or with hard cornering. The tire pressures especially deviate much less from season to season, as well. In reality, I very rarely had to adjust the tire pressures in my '08 CTS that I had for 15 months, and so far the same for my two month old CTS-V. The tires don't seem to lose pressure like they do with air, either. A lot of racers use Nitrogen for it's consistency and improved performance.

As far as the claims for increased mileage and decreased tire wear, well, that's not from the Nitrogen, but from the improved inflation of the tires and lack of deviation. Under-inflation is a well known cause of premature or uneven tire wear, and does reduce fuel economy, too. As far as the claims from the ad, that's probably an over-statement, but in my opinion, Nitrogen is the real deal.
 

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2008 CTS 3.6L DI RWD, GMPP new engine 11/2013
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"Snake Oil In Your Tires:" http://aardvark.co.nz/daily/2008/0311.shtml

CONSUMER REPORTS air-filled vs. nitrogen-filled tire test results: http://blogs.consumerreports.org/photos/uncategorized/2007/10/04/nitrogen_mainchart_consumer.gif
In the CR test, pressure loss for a Michelin® HX MXM4 (OEM 2008-09 Cadillac CTS 18" All-Season Performance) tire filled with air was a whopping .2 lb per year worse than the same tire filled with nitrogen. Oh my gawd!

lol

Sorry, st4422 and marktanner, but you guys are only fooling yourselves.
 

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Sedan de Ville, CTS
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My dealer also routinely replaces the air with Nitrogen in all of it's new cars.At first, I was not pleased, because it was going to be very difficult to find Nitrogen to keep the tires fully inflated. However, the stuff really performs as advertised. The tire pressure deviates much less with temperature than air does. This is notable even while driving or with hard cornering. The tire pressures especially deviate much less from season to season, as well. In reality, I very rarely had to adjust the tire pressures in my '08 CTS that I had for 15 months, and so far the same for my two month old CTS-V. The tires don't seem to lose pressure like they do with air, either. A lot of racers use Nitrogen for it's consistency and improved performance.

As far as the claims for increased mileage and decreased tire wear, well, that's not from the Nitrogen, but from the improved inflation of the tires and lack of deviation. Under-inflation is a well known cause of premature or uneven tire wear, and does reduce fuel economy, too. As far as the claims from the ad, that's probably an over-statement, but in my opinion, Nitrogen is the real deal.
Screw the "overstatement." As the head of NADA said in an article on Camaros being priced at $2500 over MSRP, "you can shear the sheep several times, but you can skin the critter only once."

And we wonder why Detroit is in the shape that it is. I admit that I really should not connect this sales pitch with Detroit since dealers are separate entities. Then again, the "corporate culture" of misleading info goes up and down the chain of command within the auto world.

Looks like the people in the auto business just never learn.
 

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I did it thru Valvoline where I get my oil changed. $29. No difference in gas mileage however my tire pressure seems to be 35 on the hwy in the winter and up to 37 on a hot summer day... minimum fluctations. If you live in an area where you change altitude (Rocky mountains) this could be very helpful (This is why aircraft use nitrogen in there tires) Ive done it for about six months and havent had to add any yet. Not sure its worth it a sea level though.
 

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Sedan de Ville, CTS
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A local GM dealer also offered me something like the above. He was telling me how much gasoline I could save by using nitrogen. He reassured me that I would save substantial dollars every day for the rest of my life.

But being me, I simply out-smarted him by turning down the nitrogen and purchasing 2 of the gas saving devices that we have all seen on ebay. In fact, I am going to buy a third one tomorrow and put them all on one of my vehicles. I will save so much gas that I might need another tank to store it in.

There is no way that I would let that dealer fool me. Ebay vendor even promised me a full refund if I did not increase my gas mileage up to 200%. (I believe that the 3 devices might get me close to 600%.) That dealer does not know whom he is dealing with. I ain't nearly as dumb as I look.
 

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2019 XT5
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337 Posts
"Snake Oil In Your Tires:" http://aardvark.co.nz/daily/2008/0311.shtml

CONSUMER REPORTS air-filled vs. nitrogen-filled tire test results: http://blogs.consumerreports.org/photos/uncategorized/2007/10/04/nitrogen_mainchart_consumer.gif
In the CR test, pressure loss for a Michelin® HX MXM4 (OEM 2008-09 Cadillac CTS 18" All-Season Performance) tire filled with air was a whopping .2 lb per year worse than the same tire filled with nitrogen. Oh my gawd!

lol

Sorry, st4422 and marktanner, but you guys are only fooling yourselves.
I'm not trying to fool anyone. Just reporting my experience. It's free so what's the harm? The tires on my other cars in the same garage have required air during the same six month period. As I said, I'm waiting to see what winter brings.
 

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2008 CTS 3.6L DI RWD, GMPP new engine 11/2013
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I'm not trying to fool anyone. Just reporting my experience. It's free so what's the harm? The tires on my other cars in the same garage have required air during the same six month period. As I said, I'm waiting to see what winter brings.
I'm a real stickler for proper tire inflation (w/ air compressor in my garage). My experience in the past six months is similar to yours, not because of air vs. nitrogen; but rather, I suspect, because pressure retention (air or nitrogen) in the Michelin® low-profile tires is far better than in many others (see CR test results link in previous post).
 

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2017 ATS-V Sedan, Vector Blue/Black, 6MT
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I'm a stickler for tire pressures, too. My FE3 CTS and my V both came with Michelin PS2's. I have the same tires on my M5 and my 911, and they came on my GT3, too. I frequently have to add or subtract air from all of those cars, especially as the seasons change, and can't drive them more than about a mile without the pressure changing, for when I do need air. Over a year and a half, I just haven't had to do this with the Caddy's with the Nitrogen. Better still, I didn't have to pay for it either time. Overall, my experience has been very positive. I know some people in my local Porsche club who have also switched to Nitrogen, and their experiences are similar to mine. They have also noted less temperature rise while tracking their cars with the Nitrogen, as I have noted during hard street driving. My experience has been positive enough that I intend to switch the other cars over to Nitrogen, even though that won't be free. The convenience factor alone is worth the minimal expense, IMO. Try it for yourself before you condemn it.
 

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The real benefit to nitrogen is the lack of moisture content. It is that moisture that causes the fluctution in pressure that everyone is talking about. The fact that tires filled with nitrogen may require less attention to maintaining tire pressure is a result of that moisture content not boiling off more so than the properties of the nitrogen itself.
If it makes you feel better, then use it!
 

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Try it for yourself before you condemn it.
I added air to my Michelin tires last winter, and since have bled air as the ambient outside temperature rose. When seasonal cold weather returns, I'll need to add air again. In my daily driving routine, tire pressure rises about 2-4 lbs average and about 4-6 lbs max in hottest weather conditions. No hassle, no problem.

If I switch to nitrogen, then perhaps I would need to add a fraction of a pound less in cold weather; and in daily driving, the friction/heat pressure rise would be somewhat less. That's it? Much ado about nothing, in my opinion.

Okay. Maybe I need to try nitrogen for myself because, otherwise, I don't "get it."
 

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2009 CTS DI AWD FE2 CRYSTAL RED TINTCOAT/LIGHT TITANIUM
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I added air to my Michelin tires last winter, and since have bled air as the ambient outside temperature rose. When seasonal cold weather returns, I'll need to add air again. In my daily driving routine, tire pressure rises about 2-4 lbs average and about 4-6 lbs max in hottest weather conditions. No hassle, no problem.

If I switch to nitrogen, then perhaps I would need to add a fraction of a pound less in cold weather; and in daily driving, the friction/heat pressure rise would be somewhat less. That's it? Much ado about nothing, in my opinion.

Okay. Maybe I need to try nitrogen for myself because, otherwise, I don't "get it."
There really isn't anything 'to get'. Nitrogen is simply a more stable gas under pressure than is air. If you don't want tire pressure fluctuations due to temperature changes, then use nitrogen. If you don't care about a few pounds of fluctuation, then don't use nitrogen. That's all there is to it. I believe the whole nitrogen argument has been wildly blown out of proportion by those that want to profit from its use. :hmm:
 

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Cadillac CTS 3.6DI 2009, Black Raven
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Got this info from www.alldatadiy.com

Hope it answers all questions. :cool2:

INFORMATION
Bulletin No.: 05-03-10-020B
Date: January 22, 2009
Subject:
Use of Nitrogen Gas in Tires
Models:
2010 and Prior GM Passenger Cars and Trucks (including Saturn)
2010 and Prior HUMMER H2, H3
2009 and Prior Saab 9-7X
Supercede:
This bulletin is being revised to add the 2009 and 2010 model years. Please discard Corporate Bulletin Number 05-03-10-020A (Section 03 - Suspension).
GM's Position on the Use of Nitrogen Gas in Tires
General Motors does not oppose the use of purified nitrogen as an inflation gas for tires. We expect the theoretical benefits to be reduced in practical use due to the lack of an existing infrastructure to continuously facilitate inflating tires with nearly pure nitrogen. Even occasional inflation with compressed atmospheric air will negate many of the theoretical benefits. Given those theoretical benefits, practical limitations, and the robust design of GM original equipment TPC tires, the realized benefits to our customer of inflating their tires with purified nitrogen are expected to be minimal.
The Promise of Nitrogen: Under Controlled Conditions
Recently, nitrogen gas (for use in inflating tires) has become available to the general consumer through some retailers. The use of nitrogen gas to inflate tires is a technology used in automobile racing. The following benefits under controlled conditions are attributed to nitrogen gas and its unique properties:
A reduction in the expected loss of Tire Pressure over time.
A reduction in the variance of Tire Pressures with temperature changes due to reduction of water vapor concentration.
A reduction of long term rubber degradation due to a decrease in oxygen concentrations.
Important: These are obtainable performance improvements when relatively pure nitrogen gas is used to inflate tires under controlled conditions.
The Promise of Nitrogen: Real World Use
Nitrogen inflation can provide some benefit by reducing gas migration (pressure loss) at the molecular level through the tire structure. NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration) has stated that the inflation pressure loss of tires can be up to 5% a month.
Nitrogen molecules are larger than oxygen molecules and, therefore, are less prone to "seeping" through the tire casing. The actual obtainable benefits of nitrogen vary, based on the physical construction and the materials used in the manufacturing of the tire being inflated.
Another potential benefit of nitrogen is the reduced oxidation of tire components. Research has demonstrated that oxygen consumed in the oxidation process of the tire primarily comes from the inflation media. Therefore, it is reasonable to assume that oxidation of tire components can be reduced if the tire is inflated with pure nitrogen. However, only very small amounts of oxygen are required to begin the normal oxidation process. Even slight contamination of the tire inflation gas with compressed atmospheric air during normal inflation pressure maintenance, may negate the benefits of using nitrogen.
GM Tire Quality, Technology and Focus of Importance
Since 1972, General Motors has designed tires under the TPC (Tire Performance Criteria) specification system, which includes specific requirements that ensure robust tire performance under normal usage.
General Motors works with tire suppliers to design and manufacture original equipment tires for GM vehicles. The GM TPC addresses required performance with respect to both inflation pressure retention, and endurance properties for original equipment tires. The inflation pressure retention requirements address availability of oxygen and oxidation concerns, while endurance requirements ensure the mechanical structure of the tire has sufficient strength. This combination has provided our customers with tires that maintain their structural integrity throughout their useful treadlife under normal operating conditions.
Regardless of the inflation media for tires (atmospheric air or nitrogen), inflation pressure maintenance of tires is critical for overall tire, and ultimately, vehicle performance. Maintaining the correct inflation pressure allows the tire to perform as intended by the vehicle manufacturer in many areas, including comfort, fuel economy, stopping distance, cornering, traction, treadwear, and noise. Since the load carrying capability of a tire is related to inflation pressure, proper inflation pressure maintenance is necessary for the tire to support the load imposed by the vehicle without excessive structural degradation.
Important: Regardless of the inflation media for tires (atmospheric air or nitrogen), inflation pressure maintenance of tires is critical for overall tire, and ultimately, vehicle performance. overall tire, and ultimately, vehicle performance.
 

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2014 SRX Premium w/20" chrome
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Always gonna be alot of pro's and con's about this subject.

Because I purchased several vehicle from a local GM dealer, during a service visit he offered to fill my tires with nitrogen, free. Had nothing to loose. Personally, I didn't experience any noticable difference that would convince me to pay for this service in the future. No difference in tire maintenance, ride, handling, fuel mileage etc. I always check my tires at least once a week whether nitrogen filled or air.
 

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Per the GM statement, to realize these benefits it is critical to have pure nitrogen in the tires. So, I must ask: How is the existing atmospheric gas removed from the tire? Even a newly mounted tire is full of atmospheric gas (just at 1 atmosphere rather than pressurized). Unless you have some sort of setup that will allow you to "flush" the atmospheric gas out, you are going to be left with less that pure nitrogen in the tires.

If you can get nitrogen fill for free, go for it. However, I would not pay for it.
 
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