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2014 ATS 2.0T 6spd manual Performance RWD
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I've posted on this before. Not sure where I heard about it, but it makes sense. As air in the diff heats up, it expands and needs to escape thru the vent tube otherwise pressure builds up forcing air (and fluid) past the seals. It would seem that an adequate vent would save GM a lot of money and customers a lot of grief. When my seals were replaced, I did not explicitly ask about the vent tube. Did they replace it? I dunno. Is there some way to service it ourselves to keep it open? Again, I dunno. I would like to learn more if anyone can shed further light on this.
Thanks for adding on!

This is what it looks like, you can replace it but I just unscrew it and clean it once a year: ACDelco® 23156298 - GM Original Equipment™ Rear Straight Axle Vent Tube

Basically a complex piece of non-functional low quality c**p that replaces the simple vent tube used on most axle applications.

Note with a clogged vent tube, not only will it vent fluid through a seal when hot (pressure is going to find a spot to vent) it will also draw air and any other stuff built up around the compromised seal area when it cools. A vent tube is intended to keep the axle breathing point where it won't normally suck in water and road grit which a small hose extending slightly above the axle does admirably as it has done for decades.

Rodger
I was hoping you would answer, I always enjoy reading, and learning something from, your posts. Please never leave the ATS subforum haha.

Can you provide more detail on the cleaning process? Do you jack the rear of the car up? Is the vent tube easy enough to get to? Are any special tools needed? Do you just spray water or pressurized air through it? This is my first RWD car so this is completely new to me, thanks.
 

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2014 ATS 3.6 Premium RWD, 2016 Corvette Z06, 2018 GMC Sierra Denali 2500HD Diesel
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Thanks for adding on!



I was hoping you would answer, I always enjoy reading, and learning something from, your posts. Please never leave the ATS subforum haha.

Can you provide more detail on the cleaning process? Do you jack the rear of the car up? Is the vent tube easy enough to get to? Are any special tools needed? Do you just spray water or pressurized air through it? This is my first RWD car so this is completely new to me, thanks.
Thank you for your kind comments!

It may vary by ATS powertrain configuration and exhaust system but with my 3.6 RWD premium it is easy to service this breather without jacking the car up. All you need is a wrench or deep socket to pull it out and there is enough clearance to do the work with the car sitting on the ground.

I use brake cleaner as a cleaning solvent for this but WD-40 will work fine also and is a little safer to deal with (still very flammable but it isn't as aggressive in attacking paint and plastic parts). If you use WD-40, pour a little into a glass or plastic container (enough to cover the part), let it sit and then shake it up a couple of times. I use the air nozzle on my compressor to blow it out but if you do this you just need some air through it and don't try to make a perfect seal or you may turn the little rattle cap on top into a projectile. Make sure it is dry before you install.

Originally it has some blue RTV type seal/thread locker on it and you can clean the old and replace it with a new coat but it should be rated for fairly high temperature because this area gets hot. Because this is an ongoing maintenance issue with the ATS, I use teflon tape. Some people will object because Teflon is also a thread lubricant but I have never had an issue with this little plug loosening and quite frankly given the ATS axle failure rate it is probably better off with no plug/vent than a clogged vent. NO, I am not suggesting that anyone remove and throw away this breather but I wouldn't stress over the slight chance that this plug could loosen due to Teflon tape. Do NOT use Teflon tape on a differential (or other) drain plug because one of those coming loose would be a big deal.

It takes longer to type than it does to remove and clean the part, it is really easy maintenance. One thing I really like about the ATS is the ease of normal maintenance along with unusual stuff like this vent. With the 3.6 RWD setup, the oil filter is a bare cartridge that drops in from the top and the only caution is that the front cat is located close to the drain plug making it easy to burn your wrist if you aren't careful. I learned this quickly when I did the 1,000 mile change on my 2008 CTS which had the same setup and I haven't forgotten :)

Rodger
 

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2014 ATS 2.0T 6spd manual Performance RWD
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OP I am sorry to have gotten your thread off track, hopefully this is info you find useful. I will be done after this post. ;)

Thank you for your kind comments!

It may vary by ATS powertrain configuration and exhaust system but with my 3.6 RWD premium it is easy to service this breather without jacking the car up. All you need is a wrench or deep socket to pull it out and there is enough clearance to do the work with the car sitting on the ground.

I use brake cleaner as a cleaning solvent for this but WD-40 will work fine also and is a little safer to deal with (still very flammable but it isn't as aggressive in attacking paint and plastic parts). If you use WD-40, pour a little into a glass or plastic container (enough to cover the part), let it sit and then shake it up a couple of times. I use the air nozzle on my compressor to blow it out but if you do this you just need some air through it and don't try to make a perfect seal or you may turn the little rattle cap on top into a projectile. Make sure it is dry before you install.

Originally it has some blue RTV type seal/thread locker on it and you can clean the old and replace it with a new coat but it should be rated for fairly high temperature because this area gets hot. Because this is an ongoing maintenance issue with the ATS, I use teflon tape. Some people will object because Teflon is also a thread lubricant but I have never had an issue with this little plug loosening and quite frankly given the ATS axle failure rate it is probably better off with no plug/vent than a clogged vent. NO, I am not suggesting that anyone remove and throw away this breather but I wouldn't stress over the slight chance that this plug could loosen due to Teflon tape. Do NOT use Teflon tape on a differential (or other) drain plug because one of those coming loose would be a big deal.

It takes longer to type than it does to remove and clean the part, it is really easy maintenance. One thing I really like about the ATS is the ease of normal maintenance along with unusual stuff like this vent. With the 3.6 RWD setup, the oil filter is a bare cartridge that drops in from the top and the only caution is that the front cat is located close to the drain plug making it easy to burn your wrist if you aren't careful. I learned this quickly when I did the 1,000 mile change on my 2008 CTS which had the same setup and I haven't forgotten :)

Rodger
Mine is a 2.0T RWD manual car, so perhaps it would be the same to get to. I have a spray can of Brakleen, is it okay to just spray through the vent from the bottom where the threads are that screw into the diff housing? I do not have an air compressor. I'll try to take note of how tight the vent is when I take if off, but if you have any torque spec recommendation feel free to mention what that should be when screwing it back in.

Nice. The top mounted oil filter was the only thing I liked about my wife's old Cobalt hah, made oil changes simpler and less messy.
 

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2015 ATS Coupe, Premium 3.6 AWD; 2005 Mercedes SLK roadster; 2003 Suburban
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Thank you for your kind comments!

It may vary by ATS powertrain configuration and exhaust system but with my 3.6 RWD premium it is easy to service this breather without jacking the car up. All you need is a wrench or deep socket to pull it out and there is enough clearance to do the work with the car sitting on the ground.

I use brake cleaner as a cleaning solvent for this but WD-40 will work fine also and is a little safer to deal with (still very flammable but it isn't as aggressive in attacking paint and plastic parts). If you use WD-40, pour a little into a glass or plastic container (enough to cover the part), let it sit and then shake it up a couple of times. I use the air nozzle on my compressor to blow it out but if you do this you just need some air through it and don't try to make a perfect seal or you may turn the little rattle cap on top into a projectile. Make sure it is dry before you install.

Originally it has some blue RTV type seal/thread locker on it and you can clean the old and replace it with a new coat but it should be rated for fairly high temperature because this area gets hot. Because this is an ongoing maintenance issue with the ATS, I use teflon tape. Some people will object because Teflon is also a thread lubricant but I have never had an issue with this little plug loosening and quite frankly given the ATS axle failure rate it is probably better off with no plug/vent than a clogged vent. NO, I am not suggesting that anyone remove and throw away this breather but I wouldn't stress over the slight chance that this plug could loosen due to Teflon tape. Do NOT use Teflon tape on a differential (or other) drain plug because one of those coming loose would be a big deal.

It takes longer to type than it does to remove and clean the part, it is really easy maintenance. One thing I really like about the ATS is the ease of normal maintenance along with unusual stuff like this vent. With the 3.6 RWD setup, the oil filter is a bare cartridge that drops in from the top and the only caution is that the front cat is located close to the drain plug making it easy to burn your wrist if you aren't careful. I learned this quickly when I did the 1,000 mile change on my 2008 CTS which had the same setup and I haven't forgotten :)

Rodger
There has been much written lately in regard to ATS differential failures and it always seems to concern the rear diff. Having a 3.6 with AWD, I'm wondering if there is any type of venting issues on the front end as well as the rear.
 

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2010 Cadillac SRX, 2017 Cadillac Escalade
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Hello all, I just turned twenty, I’m ready to step up to the plate and buy my first used car from a dealership. I’ve been drawn to the ATS since it came out, and since it comes with optional AWD, I figured it would be a good choice, since I live in the rust belt. I’ve been seeing recently that the 2013 and 2014 models have been going for really cheap recently, cheap as in sub $15k. I guess it’s just that luxury car depreciation, but it’s at a reasonable enough price for me to finance. What I am worried about is the engine and transmission. I’m just curious as what some common failure points are, what to look for when going to see these cars. I’ve been warned numerous times about the 3.6 and timing chains, so I’ve been looking at mostly 2.0T models. I’m coming out of a 23 year old V8 BMW, reliability and ease of repair are my goals.
We purchased a new 2013 ATS 2.0T automatic for our son. The headlights are not bright enough driving at night. We had new, brighter headlight assemblies put in. The CUE screen cracked twice for no apparent reason and had to be replaced (under warranty). No major issues with this car. It was totaled in 2017 - my son was t-boned when a guy ran a red light at 60 miles an hour. All airbags deployed and he walked away with a sprained knee and bruised ribs where he was thrown against the center armrest. So as far as safety goes, I think it’s among the best. He replaced it with a 2014 ATS, exactly like the one that was totaled. It has had just a few minor issues, but not terribly expensive to fix ( extended warranty has just expired). He is diligent about regular maintenance and so far the 2014 has served him well. Good luck with your decision.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
I’m quite pleased with my findings, I’m happy to hear about clogging different vent tubes, and delaminating cue screens(although I’ve known about this issue for quite some time), and the dodgey build quality, 2.0T lean tune and engine detonation, I’m sorry to hear that one’s son got t-boned, but I’m happy to know that it’s a safe car. This is more or less what I wanted this is how I know what to look for.

Thanks
Andrew
 

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2018 CTS Luxury 3.6 RWD
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I’m quite pleased with my findings, I’m happy to hear about clogging different vent tubes, and delaminating cue screens(although I’ve known about this issue for quite some time), and the dodgey build quality, 2.0T lean tune and engine detonation, I’m sorry to hear that one’s son got t-boned, but I’m happy to know that it’s a safe car. This is more or less what I wanted this is how I know what to look for.

Thanks
Andrew
Carefully Note the recommended octane is 93 for the 2.0T.
I know it was mentioned, but worth saying again.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Carefully Note the recommended octane is 93 for the 2.0T.
I know it was mentioned, but worth saying again.
I already have to fill up with 93, it’s just force of habit to say fill it up premium at this point. But I’m still laughing that the 2.0T, with half the cylinders and forced induction almost makes as much as my 23 year old BMW V8. I can only imagine the fuel savings if I went from this to any other car with that engine. But I get 14 MPG in this car, not because it’s a medium displacement V8, I get 14 Gallons Per Mile because I drive with a lead foot. I should’ve mentioned that, but I’m not a responsible driver by any means, I drive my cars like I stole them. That being said, when things break I’m the kind of person that has them sorted right away, I don’t like driving knowing that my car is hurting. I know that the 3.6l has had a revision in 2013, but I’m still afraid of timing chain stretch, it’s like the Northstar engine, I’m well aware there was an update to it, but I still wouldn’t want to own one. The 2.5 seems like the safest option, but it’s only offered on the base model with RWD, and the 2.0T seems like the solid middle of the road option. I’m sure there has to be some recall for the early 2.0T models for the excessive lean burn issue? I’m going to keep my eyes peeled for good ATS/CTS models in my area and I’ll try to see if any that have had all the required maintenance are in my price range.

thanks once again
 

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2014 ATS 2.0T
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Hello all, I just turned twenty, I’m ready to step up to the plate and buy my first used car from a dealership. I’ve been drawn to the ATS since it came out, and since it comes with optional AWD, I figured it would be a good choice, since I live in the rust belt. I’ve been seeing recently that the 2013 and 2014 models have been going for really cheap recently, cheap as in sub $15k. I guess it’s just that luxury car depreciation, but it’s at a reasonable enough price for me to finance. What I am worried about is the engine and transmission. I’m just curious as what some common failure points are, what to look for when going to see these cars. I’ve been warned numerous times about the 3.6 and timing chains, so I’ve been looking at mostly 2.0T models. I’m coming out of a 23 year old V8 BMW, reliability and ease of repair are my goals.
I can tell you this- I own a 2013 2.0t. I bought it with 20k miles on it about 4 years ago. I read about all of the issues and what not too. Long story short, I put a tune on it, high flow downpipe, catch can and silicon intake tube with a k&n too. I put 50k miles on it with the tune fully cranked up and the ONLY issue I ever had was the cue screen malfunctioning at about 65k miles and the rear seal started leaking at about 70k miles. It ran strong and hard and nothing serious went wrong. I’ve since returned to stock because I got what I wanted out of it, when I was into it. Still own it and LOVE driving it- esp the handling! Rear seats are tiny bit I liked how small of a vehicle it is. NO horror stories here
 

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Hello all, I just turned twenty, I’m ready to step up to the plate and buy my first used car from a dealership. I’ve been drawn to the ATS since it came out, and since it comes with optional AWD, I figured it would be a good choice, since I live in the rust belt. I’ve been seeing recently that the 2013 and 2014 models have been going for really cheap recently, cheap as in sub $15k. I guess it’s just that luxury car depreciation, but it’s at a reasonable enough price for me to finance. What I am worried about is the engine and transmission. I’m just curious as what some common failure points are, what to look for when going to see these cars. I’ve been warned numerous times about the 3.6 and timing chains, so I’ve been looking at mostly 2.0T models. I’m coming out of a 23 year old V8 BMW, reliability and ease of repair are my goals.
Stay away from all of those. Get the last real caddies- the 4.X- like an 89-95 Deville. Everyone forgets that the 88-89 Cadillac everything but the shitmoron was indestructible. They will hold their value, mechanical parts are plentiful and they’re a pleasure to work on. I changed my serpentine belt on my 89 Deville in literally 7 minutes. They were well built cars.
 

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2014 ATS 2.0T 6M Premium
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Stay away from all of those. Get the last real caddies- the 4.X- like an 89-95 Deville. Everyone forgets that the 88-89 Cadillac everything but the shitmoron was indestructible. They will hold their value, mechanical parts are plentiful and they’re a pleasure to work on. I changed my serpentine belt on my 89 Deville in literally 7 minutes. They were well built cars.
Yikes, I think the ATS has it's problems, but if it's less reliable than an 80's caddy then it's time to sell.
 

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2014 ATS 2.0T 6spd manual Performance RWD
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90's Cadillacs, or really all GM cars for that matter, were the dark ages of GM interior design, fit & finish, and panel gap. I love the direction Cadillac is taking now. Well, was taking...the CT4/5 are massive disappointments imo.
 

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2019 Silverado LD | Blacked Out
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Here's whats been between my wife and I:

2005 CTS
2006 CTS-V
2010 CTS Premium Sedan
2015 ATS Premium with Kona.. (love the kona)

We made the switch to the ATS due to the jump in price of the CTS at the 2014 body style change. (n) Was a mistake. ATS was just too small. Fun to drive, however not enough space. In my opinion they might as well of only made coupes, the back seat was useless.

My wife drove the 2010... Her favorite car to date.
I spur of the moment traded the ATS and a Truck on a new Silverado and a Redline Equinox. The equinox is halfway through the lease. Shes still mad at me. 😑 Were actually casually keeping our eye out for a previous body style CTS Wagon.

Either way, welcome to the club! Once you go cadillac you never go backillac. Cheesy, sorry. 🙃
 

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Discussion Starter #35
90's Cadillacs, or really all GM cars for that matter, were the dark ages of GM interior design, fit & finish, and panel gap. I love the direction Cadillac is taking now. Well, was taking...the CT4/5 are massive disappointments imo.
I have to agree with you there, I think Cadillac was on a slippery slope downwards in that era, uninspired design, poor quality, rushed to market engines, and with the engines they just had failure after failure. They had the bombshell of the V8-6-4, then the HT4100 head gasket nightmare, and then the Northstar came trading through, stripping its comically proportioned head bolts shredding its belts and milk shaking itself, it became the automotive industries favorite horse to kick, the 80s and 90s were definitely dark days for the brand. But I quite enjoy the CT and XT series, they get away from the unmitigated disaster that was the first gen CUE screen, and they provide a more modern look, wether that look is something you like or not is in the eye of the beholder. Like I said, I’m going to keep my eyes peeled for second-third generation CTS and ATS
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Here's whats been between my wife and I:

2005 CTS
2006 CTS-V
2010 CTS Premium Sedan
2015 ATS Premium with Kona.. (love the kona)

We made the switch to the ATS due to the jump in price of the CTS at the 2014 body style change. (n) Was a mistake. ATS was just too small. Fun to drive, however not enough space. In my opinion they might as well of only made coupes, the back seat was useless.

My wife drove the 2010... Her favorite car to date.
I spur of the moment traded the ATS and a Truck on a new Silverado and a Redline Equinox. The equinox is halfway through the lease. Shes still mad at me. 😑 Were actually casually keeping our eye out for a previous body style CTS Wagon.

Either way, welcome to the club! Once you go cadillac you never go backillac. Cheesy, sorry. 🙃
I love the CTS wagon, I just like wagons in general, they’re so much more fun, something about it. Too bad they’re very difficult to find, even more so if you want a manual. For a time I was looking at the new Buick Regal wagons, but with the options I want they’re a touch out of my price range, even with my employee discount
 

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2019 Silverado LD | Blacked Out
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The wagon would be my Wife's daily. Auto is a must... She saw a plum V wagon the other day. Plum though.. ehh. Everything we've owned is black. A ton of Pontiacs before the switch over.
 

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I have a 2014 standard 2.0t with the manual. I don't have CUE so I've avoided those issues, but I've had the differential and cam solenoid repairs. The cam thing is covered by a 10/100 special warranty, FWIW.

My car has been mostly trouble-free beside those things and the week it spent in the shop shortly after I bought it new. The car repeatedly went into limp mode. I never got a straight answer from the dealer for what the fix was, but I've picked up from forums that they probably reflashed the tune to be richer.
 

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I'm pretty new to owning a Cadillac. I recently bought a 2016 ats coupe base model. It was a one owner lease turn in with a clean carfax report. Im happy with the car thus far, but sceptical about all the electronics in these new cars today. I did experience some torque converter clutch shudder about a month after buying it, but for some strange reason it rarely happens now. Repairs are expensive on Cadillacs, but my friend owns an auto shop, so I only pay $50/hr labor rates. I guess having a good friend of 20+ yrs helps. Lol
 

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2013 ATS 3.6 Premium RWD
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I did experience some torque converter clutch shudder about a month after buying it, but for some strange reason it rarely happens now. Repairs are expensive on Cadillacs, but my friend owns an auto shop, so I only pay $50/hr labor rates. I guess having a good friend of 20+ yrs helps. Lol
Have you had the TSB/warranty trans flush done yet? If not, it would be recommended to do to help with other 8-speed issues PLUS free trans fluid change! That labor rate is tough to beat, even if they take twice as long it's still cheaper than the dealer! :ROFLMAO:
 
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