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2005 CTS-V
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98 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just painted my calipers yesterday and now need to get them back together so I have a car to drive....does anyone know the torque spec's for reassembling the calipers? Hopefully someone can hit me back soon. Wrench in hand and ready. Thanks guys.
-Josh
 

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Premium Member
2005 CTS-V
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8,363 Posts
The caiiper (bracket) bolts should be coated in threadlocker and allowed to dry (cure) about ten minutes. Torque is 96 ft. pounds. I have trouble getting the torque over 90 ft. pounds.
 

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'05 CTS-V
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8,037 Posts
The brake caliper overhaul section of the FSM tells you not to separate the caliper halves, so there's no torque spec listed. The bleeders are 124lb-in.
 

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2004 CTS-V, 423 RWHP / 380 RWTQ
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578 Posts
Did you separate the two halves of the calipers? If you did, I'm impressed you got them apart! I tried when I had mine powder coated and even with a 1/2 in socket with massive breaker bar, the heads on the nuts just wanted to strip before cracking loose.
 

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Premium Member
2005 CTS-V
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8,363 Posts
what?

Do you:

1. Apply loctite to bolts
2. Tighten them on the wheel end
3. Wait for the loctite to dry/cure
4. Then torque to spec?

You torque before the loctite sets, otherwise, you break the loctite free.

I follow the instructions in the GM Service Manual which says to (1) apply the threadlocker (GM 12345493) two-thirds of the threaded length of the caliper to knuckle mounting bolts with no gaps in the applied threadlocker; and (2) allow the treadlocker to cure approximately ten minutes before installation. GM's 12345493 threadlocker is Pematex Threadlocker Red and does not fully cure (or set) for 1-24 hours depending on temperature. Since it is an anaerobic material it cannot fully cure in the presence of air. The ten-minute curing time prescribed by GM is presumably required to ensure the threadlocker stays in the threads as opposed to be displaced by the rotation of the bolt (like a an Archimedes screw).
 
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