Cadillac Owners Forum banner

1 - 20 of 48 Posts

·
Super Moderator
White Diamond '03 DHS (with DTS floor shift)
Joined
·
86,792 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Anyone else see todays race? Haven't seen a finish like that in a long time. I was literally watch the last lap with my jaw dropped. :jawdrop:
 

·
Registered
2011 Crown Vic LX, 2009 Chevy Malibu 2LT
Joined
·
5,607 Posts
I haven't watched a full race in over 10 years, but I do occasionally tune in for the last few laps - like today. Awesome finish, and last weeks drama just made it that much better. Stewart acting a fool was also entertaining.
 

·
Registered
02 Escalade | 02 Corvette "Goldilocks" | 03 Blazer 4x4 | 92 Caprice Wagon LS1/T56
Joined
·
19,718 Posts
What did I miss? I was in Daytona. lol
 

·
Registered
Alexandra - 96 SDV Clyde - 15 Silvy
Joined
·
6,394 Posts
That was ridiculous. Hopefully Hamlin's ok, he drilled the wall hard. That was an exciting finish though, did NOT expect that!
 

·
Registered
2003 Cadillac Seville SLS
Joined
·
1,299 Posts
Yea i watched it pretty amazed at how Tony reacted to getting blocked on the restart. Hope Hamlin is doing okay that was a hard hit!
 

·
Registered
Cadillac 95 STS, 02 SLS
Joined
·
13,792 Posts
^^^ That might be a NASCAR race worth watching ..... but only if other forms of "reality" TV were not up to par that day!

It seems to me that NASCAR races and racing is more about tribal gathering and the need to be a fan than about auto racing. Let's face it watching pseudo "stock cars" (covered with diaper and feminine products logo stickers) go fast (loud) in an oval requires lots of beer drinking and the occasional (the more the better) wreck to be interesting.
 

·
Registered
Alexandra - 96 SDV Clyde - 15 Silvy
Joined
·
6,394 Posts
:rolleyes:

orconn clearly doesn't get it. That's ok.

Hamlin got a L1 compression fracture. No word on how it will affect his season.
 

·
Registered
1980 Eldorado, 1974 Talisman, 2004 Volvo C70, 1975 Fleetwood 'd Elegance
Joined
·
7,958 Posts
I can't speak for Nascar, but as a fan of F1 and Indycar I have to respond.

I have followed these series since I was a child in the 60's, back when all we got was a recap on an hour long Wide World Of Sports . I guess as a child who was into cars, it was just a logical extension of my interests. Seeing cool shiny cars going fast. At that age I probably was into the crashes too. Not being able to fully understand the true impact and real life ramifications of them. I do not know of anyone who is over the age of 9 and is not mentally disabled who enjoys a race crash.

Over the last 45 years I have seen too many fine drivers killed and disabled. Even relatively minor crashes give me the chills, thinking of the many great souls lost. Aside from that, any crash brings to a stop the action and eliminates the competition that I have come to see! A driver who has been squeezing the extra micro-second out of every turn, or who has just pulled off a perfect pass on another driver, often has that negated by a bunched up restart.

One joy I get from races is following of the sport before and after the race. The development of new tech applied to the cars, the stories of building teams. (Often from mortgaging everything the principals own in the case of Indy.)

The qualifying part of the race is by far my favorite of each race. Where the driver is on the track, often alone or in small, spread out groups. It is a time when the battle is really the driver vs the track, more than driver vs driver. I provides some of the most interesting and suspenseful moments in my opinion.

The series' I follow do some races on ovals, they are my least favorite races. The only exception to that is the track at Indy, which is so large and relatively low-banked it is more of a road course, with only left turns. Any track that isn't large enough to have different weather conditions for drivers to deal with, isn't large enough to race on. (IMO) How drivers deal with the weather is another part of racing I love.

Last of the joys of racing is following the humans that are behind all of those helmets and fire suits. The personal stories of their families, their coming up in racing, their charitable activities, their triumphs and tribulations away from the track. These stories fill the "suits" with humans and make the aspect of crashes all the more cringe-worthy.

As for Nascar, I follow it in the media. A lot of drivers swap back and forth around different series. I also watch the couple of road course races they run each year. In addition to the small ovals and the not racing in rain, the other thing that turned me off of Nascar was the "anti" nature of the fans. It seems to not be enough to have a favorite driver or even drivers. It seems the fans spend as much or more energy hating other drivers as cheering theirs. That turned me off when I was still following the series regularly. Perhaps that is just my problem. I guess to folks who follow any major league sports that may be normal. I don't and to me it was not enjoyable.

I have my favorite drivers and enjoy watching them win. I have never left a race mad because of who won.
 

·
Super Moderator
White Diamond '03 DHS (with DTS floor shift)
Joined
·
86,792 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
To each his own. I find FB, BB and golf boring, but that was not my point. I didn't mean to start a debate over which sport is better.
 

·
Registered
Alexandra - 96 SDV Clyde - 15 Silvy
Joined
·
6,394 Posts
This is CF Ranger. What were you expecting?

I agree with Dave. I enjoy watching my driver race, do well, and win. I also have enjoyed watching him grow as the years have passed. I've seen him go from a 20-something guy with a bright, hot fire inside him, to a 40-something vet with kids, a wonderful life, and a few tricks up his sleeve for the unsuspecting youngsters. And even though there may be drivers I don't necessarily like, I don't enjoy seeing them wreck.
 

·
Registered
2006 STS4 V8 1SG & 2007 STS V8 1SE
Joined
·
8,178 Posts
I miss racing, real racing. Before pit road speed limits, restrictor plates/popoff valves, templates, spec-cars and all the rest; it may have been dangerous but was a real race.

Don't get me started on the Green-White-Checker and Nascar's newest storyline. Why not just run a 10-lap sprint?
Oh yeah - sponsor advertising.
 

·
Registered
1980 Eldorado, 1974 Talisman, 2004 Volvo C70, 1975 Fleetwood 'd Elegance
Joined
·
7,958 Posts
My intent was not to say any series was better than any other, but to illustrate the many things I find enjoyable about the sport itself. If my post comes off as anything other than that I am sorry.

I also wanted to point out that no true race fan enjoys crashes. No matter the series they follow.
 

·
Super Moderator
White Diamond '03 DHS (with DTS floor shift)
Joined
·
86,792 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
I miss racing, real racing. Before pit road speed limits, restrictor plates/popoff valves, templates, spec-cars and all the rest; it may have been dangerous but was a real race.

Don't get me started on the Green-White-Checker and Nascar's newest storyline. Why not just run a 10-lap sprint?
Oh yeah - sponsor advertising.
Roger that. The way they are going they might also just put a 100 MPH limiter on the engines as well.



My intent was not to say any series was better than any other, but to illustrate the many things I find enjoyable about the sport itself. If my post comes off as anything other than that I am sorry.
My comment was not pointed to you Dave. It was just a general statement. No biggie. Let the thread follow it's own coarse.
 

·
Premium Member
2006 STS V8 AWD, '95 Ford Ranger
Joined
·
28,963 Posts
It's hard to understand oval track racing until you've tried it. It's a huge surprise to the sportscar and F1 guys to find out that it is more technical than anything they have previously experienced. To drive in left turns at the very limits of adhesion trying to adjust the car at pit stops looking for lap time improvements in the hundredth of a second range is overwhelming to most who have tried the transition. It's hard to believe that tenths of a PSI in tire pressures can make all the difference and if you can't find it someone else will. Trying to maintain a racing line within inches lap after lap while trying to pass slower cars requires the forsight of a chess master. It's not unusual to see a 40+ car field have qualifying times from top to bottom within .2 seconds. This calls for precision in driving way beyond most other forms of motorsports. Meanwhile the F1 drivers are out there with ABS and traction control to prop up their skills; features that are relagated to the drivers in NASCAR.
 

·
Super Moderator
2013 ATS Performance 2.0T M6, 2016 Mustang GT Performance Pack, M6
Joined
·
6,637 Posts
It's hard to understand oval track racing until you've tried it. It's a huge surprise to the sportscar and F1 guys to find out that it is more technical than anything they have previously experienced.
What makes NASCAR oval racing so unappealing to many isn't that it's easy. Its that you have to sit thru numerous random length heats (called green flag runs) to get to the actual race which can be as short as 3 laps.

To drive in left turns at the very limits of adhesion trying to adjust the car at pit stops looking for lap time improvements in the hundredth of a second range is overwhelming to most who have tried the transition.
Obviously anyone jumping into anything that uses different skill sets will have a difficult time. For example, most Nascar drivers would get killed in beach volley ball (or needlepoint or circuit racing). It's really pointless to compare apples and orange. Most NBA stars would make terrible Sumo wrestlers. That doesn't mean Sumo wrestlers or their sport is superior to basketball.

It's hard to believe that tenths of a PSI in tire pressures can make all the difference and if you can't find it someone else will. Trying to maintain a racing line within inches lap after lap while trying to pass slower cars requires the forsight of a chess master. It's not unusual to see a 40+ car field have qualifying times from top to bottom within .2 seconds. This calls for precision in driving way beyond most other forms of motorsports. Meanwhile the F1 drivers are out there with ABS and traction control to prop up their skills; features that are relagated to the drivers in NASCAR.
FYI ABS and traction control are illegal in F1. Tenths of a pound in tire pressure make a huge difference in most top forms of pavement motorsport (I don't know about off road but would not be surprised).
 

·
Registered
98 DeVille, 97 DeVille d'Elegance
Joined
·
7,345 Posts
I don't like the lack of variety Nascar used to have, too many big ovals for me. I love the road courses & other tracks that provide closer racing. I'd like to see them on a flat oval track...that'll separate the men from the boys.
 
1 - 20 of 48 Posts
Top