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2004 Seville SLS
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Discussion Starter #21
trukk: :thumbsup: great list. i agree 100% with all of them. I actually had one of those 2.2l r/t engines i was building for my k-car. man that would have been sweet!
 

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'05 CTS-V, '12 CTS-V Manny Vagon
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trukk: :thumbsup: great list. i agree 100% with all of them. I actually had one of those 2.2l r/t engines i was building for my k-car. man that would have been sweet!
Thanks :D.

I figured anyone could come on here and say:

- Callaway Corvette
- Testarossa
- Countache
- Cobra Type R
- 959
- ......ETC......

I wanted to pick some more normal, but somewhat obscure cars.

-Chris
 

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'05 CTS-V, '12 CTS-V Manny Vagon
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A few more to add to my list.

16) Isuzu Impulse RS Turbo. RWD? Check. 140 HP? Check. Manual transmission? Check. 2700 lbs? Check. Lotus Tuned Suspension? Check. Half Hidden Cool Assed Headlights? Check. Same performance as a Starion/Conquest? Check.


17) Land Rover Defender 90. WAAAAAAAYYYY cooler than a Wrangler (although it may rust into a million pieces first).


18) I always really like the Alfa 75 (know as Milano here in the US). The turbo was peppy, but nothing crazy (similar to the 505 turbo). I just like the styling. It has the italian "I don't give a f**k" look to it. I mean look at the trunk area. It looks like the too a giant straight edge, and put it on top of the car, and then bent the ass end up 5 degrees. Bonus points for ahving one of the coolest logos going as well.


19) 92 Olds Achieva SCX. OK, OK, the Achieva was a pretty horrible car, but this was the 2 door, 5 speed 190hp version, that they made 500 of for SCCA homologation. Pretty unique car. I put this on my list mostly because hardly anyone had heard of them. I think they made a similar Grand Amm (and horribly called it the 442).


20) 88 Pontiac Fiero GT. The Fiero was an attempt by GM to make a mid engine Corvette. It failed to catch on, so instead the buttoned it up as the craptastic early Fiero. Pontial finally got it right in 88 with the updated GT, and then promptly canceled the car.


21) 86 Corolla GT-S. RWD, 115 hp, but weight was about 2000 lbs. Suprisingly quick little car. Probabaly won;t be many of these left, because the drift crowd has hooned these to hell and back.



Thats about all I can think off right now.

-Chris
 

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Discussion Starter #24
A few more to add to my list.


20) 88 Pontiac Fiero GT. The Fiero was an attempt by GM to make a mid engine Corvette. It failed to catch on, so instead the buttoned it up as the craptastic early Fiero. Pontial finally got it right in 88 with the updated GT, and then promptly canceled the car.



-Chris

failed to catch on? on you kidding? i never failed to catch on.... fire that is.. muahahaha.. sorry. i loved the 88 gt, but the mr4's yeah total junk. A+ for effort though on gm's behalf. would love to see another attempt at this.
 

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The 1990-1993 Deville/Fleetwood and 1993 Sixty Special. I'm sure a lot of folks will debate this choice, but those cars carried the last "vintage" Deville cues before the transition to the 1994-1996 Devilles.
Ah I couldn't agree more, good to know I'm not the only one who thinks so :)
 

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Audi TT... maybe.
The R8 would have to be on the list long before the TT came along. The TT isn't much more then a beefed up A3 with R8 styling. :ill:

I have a feeling the R8 will be our modern day Testarossa.





It's also one of few cars that even have a sexy engine bay. The 4.2L that sits in it isn't to shabby either. :D
 

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I'd nominate the 1990-96 Alfa Romeo 164 sedan. Didn't sell well in the U.S. but was considered by many connosieurs to be the premier sports sedan of the decade. I'm syrprised no one has mentioned the first generation Jaguar XK8; whether in convertibleot coupe form a real classic of the 1990's. I agree the 1992-97 Seville STS is probably "the" true classic of the nineties decade. The Honda 2000 GT is also very special. And the Miata certainly has to fing a place in the lineup somewhere!
 

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Past: 95 Fleetwood, 91 Brougham. Now: 92 Lexus SC300
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Break out your Hank Jr tapes and the mullet. I love the 3rd gens. The 350tpi and 245 series tires were pretty trick stuff for 1987.

 

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What about another forgotten GM product: the '88-'91 Buick Reatta. Especially the '90-'91 Reatta Convertible.

Smooth and elegant styling in a small, well powered (for the day) top-down cruiser. The coupes are sharp too but not as impressive as the convertible with the top down.

:thumbsup: on the Starion/Conquest and Spirit R/T. Both Cool cars. I would like to get my hands on one.
 

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All timeless classics representing the pinnacle of modern automotive technology and innovation.
 

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1993 SedanDeville (RIP), 2006 CTS (current)
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All timeless classics representing the pinnacle of modern automotive technology and innovation.
Gary, I respect your opinion but couldn't disagree more with the M-B minivan and the Pontiac Aztek as classics. The front end on the Pontiac is a reminder of how Pontiac's styling slid to the point of ugliness.

The Cimarron was less of an innovation than a poorly prepped market pitch by Cadillac.
 

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Josiah, it was a joke post, lol.
 

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Trukk had a lot of good ideas, especially the Spirit R/T. Everyone forgets those.


To me, on top of everything else, a classic must be fairly rare and highly desirable (mainly to the mainstream population)

Aside from the other's suggestions, here's mine:

American: (I'm looking through an encyclopedia of american cars lol)

1999 Buick Riviera Silver Arrow (final commemorative edition)
1997-04 Buick Regal GSX (SLP Modified GS...up to 270 horsepower)
1991-92 Cadillac Fleetwood Coupe
1993 Allante. Only year the Gorgeous Allante was available with the Northstar. Finally enough power for that car.
1994-96 Cadillac Fleetwood Brougham, especially with V4P tow package. (The other Caddies are all nice, but not nearly as rare as the FWB)
Any of the V-Series models.
1987-92 Camaro IROC/Z-28
1997 Camaro 30th Anniversary Edition
2002 Camaro 35th Anniversary Edition
1990-95 ZR-1
1996 Corvette Collector's Series LT-4
2005-07 Cobalt SS, 2009 + Cobalt SS (2.0, not the 2.4)
2009+ Camaro
2002+ 300M Special Edition
1990-95 (?) Dodge Stealth R/T Twin Turbo
1990-97 Eagle Talon TSi AWD (not everyone's taste, but I like 'em)
1989-95 Taurus SHO
1984-87(?) Mustang SVO
1989-95 Thunderbird Super Coupe
1995-98 Lincoln Mark VIII LSC
1983-87 Oldsmobile Hurst/Olds or 442
1990-92 Oldsmobile Toronado Trofeo
1994-99 Oldsmobile LSS
1995-99 Aurora (the other ones are nice too, but I like these more)
1990-93 Plymouth Laser RS Turbo
1987-92 Trans Am GTA
1994 Trans Am 25th Anniversary Edition
1999 Trans Am 30th Anniversary Edition
1997-04 Grand Prix GTX
2002 Trans Am Collector's Edition
Any of the Shelby Chryslers from the '80s. GLH, GLH-S, Lancer, CSX, etc etc.
 

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77 CDV, 06 DTS III, 69 FWB
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What becomes "collectible" largely depends on what appealed to people when new, and what people found intriguing or different enough to be memorable. Personal taste and personal connections to a particular make or model is also a factor. This is why the muscle cars of the 1960s are so popular now. They resonate with the boomers who remember them and coveted them when they were new, and now have the means to acquire them, or acquire them again as a "rolling time machine". On the other hand, cars of the 1940s and earlier have found their market appeal much diminished, as the people who remember them and coveted them when new are now either dead or very old and mostly past driving age.

I expect the hobby to fragment in the future, since most younger people have little enthusiasm for cars (and being raised on Toyotas and Hondas, who can blame them?) and those that do have wide-ranging tastes. Chad is a signal example, wanting/liking a huge variety of cars. So, what would a 50-year-old Chad choose to save for the future? Answer that, and you have a pretty good idea of what a car show 25 years into the future would look like.
 

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I just want to say that this is a really good question. I tried to compile a list earlier but was unable to; it's very broad.

@ gary88's joke post - People in the 60s never thought the Edsel would ever become a collector's item. I'm sure the Cimarron, Aztek, et al will have a following somewhere down the road.
 

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Truth is, without going into alot of details, future classic cars are simply what the current generation really likes/has, or really wants but can't afford.

Thats the reason of the inflated prices of cars from the muscle car era. The baby boomer generation is now middle aged, and are trying to buy back the car they had in their youth, or the car they've always wanted in their youth.

For the most part, those cars came (very) short on just about every aspect compared to new cars. Today we are left with vivid images from movies like fast & furious where everyone was driving around in a modded 12s race-spec car. Thats not the case, and many would not like driving one of those older cars around as a daily driver.... non-hydraulic clutch, drum brakes, minimal creature comforts that we've come to expect on the most basic cars today (power windows, delay wipers, cruise control) etc...

Which is why I think we are going to see a rapid decline in 60's/70's era muscle car values once the baby boomers pass on. The "silent generation" (baby boomers parents) are the ones that bring the 30's and 40's era cars to car shows, not baby boomers. Same goes with the muscle cars.

Of course rare, limited and low production cars will always be collectible regardless of generation, but for the run of the mill mass produced car? How many fully restored Model-T's (not hot rods) do you see at car shows? How many are owned, due to want (and not passed down) by baby boomers or younger? How many baby boomers seek out 1920's-1930's era cars? A far less amount then the number that seek out cars from the muscle era. Same can be said to compare my generation to the previous. Today generation X and Y like the muscle cars because of the "bad azz" appeal and big engines, so you do see a (slight) varied ownership age at shows, which again, has alot in part due to the various movies that bring back the classics to the scene. For the most part, my generation is into tuner/import/sports type cars and not big lumbering muscle cars, and that's going to be the type of cars that will be popular when my generation is middle aged. People will be saying "my best friend has one of those WRX STi's back in college" etc... These are going to be the types of cars that will be deseriable "future classics" because when my generation is middle aged, they will want to relive their youth as well.
 

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I can't believe you all overlooked the Studebaker Lark. :alchi:

 
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