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1991 Cadillac Sedan deVille
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530 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have noticed a leak recently under the pulley area (right side of engine) of my '91 deVille 4.9L. I THINK that it is the power steering. The level is a little low and is on the "FULL COLD" level when the car is hot.

The fluid appears to be a yellowish color, like water in oil. When I wipe the dipstick with a tissue, the fluid appears to be orange. I am not sure if this was the original fluid that GM used back then or what. The car has just turned 60k miles.

I cannot tell where the leak is from - could it be the pump or more likely a hose leaking? Looks like I can perhaps add a power steering pump of things to replace... I will add it to the power windows, egr solenoid, rear shock & ELC repair list. ;)

I was thinking about topping off with some sort of stop leak (though I know many are opposed to this stop leak stuff). I think I have learned my lesson about buying an old car with low miles... setting for a long time really ruins a car.

Thanks.
 

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1992 DeVille
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2,339 Posts
I would just leave it alone unless it was seriously leaking or giving you some kind of issue. You can always top it off and keep checking the level. As long as there is fluid in there is should be okay. Even if the fluid is old
 

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1991 Cadillac Sedan deVille
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530 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks. Well the level was a little low, so I topped it off with Lucas PS fluid with stop leak and leak stopped instantly. My mechanic said was ok to use that and said he could have checked it, was probably a hose. I am going to leave it alone for now since it has stopped leaking. Thanks!
 

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2001 Seville STS, 1990 Seville (RIP), 1972 Sedan Deville
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26,323 Posts
Most stop leak products work by causing seals to swell. This can cause them to deteriorate and eventually make it much worse.
 

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Registered
1991 Cadillac Sedan deVille
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530 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Most stop leak products work by causing seals to swell. This can cause them to deteriorate and eventually make it much worse.
True, but stopped for now - the car may be sold before it starts leaking again. ;) A little annoying that a 60k mile car has (or had) a leak, but it is an old car. I have already spent a fortune that I wasn't expecting to spend on it to even get it roadworthy, so paying to have a new pump or whatever installed wasnt in my want to do list, so I will see how long this stop leak lasts. I barely even poured in a thimble full. It is probably a leaky hose. My 1993 Cadillac Fleetwood had 102K (in 2011) and never leaked a drop of anything. I heavily regret selling that car, especially for $2000 after seeing the prices a 93-96 Fleetwood commands now.
 

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1987 Brougham D'Elegance
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146 Posts
If it's coolant you can do a few things: Check around the clamps when the car is hot and running, get a uv dye kit off (dye, uv flashlight and glasses ~$20), pressure test the coolant system (be careful to know the psi spec of the cooling system beforehand, usually in the owners manual and/or under the hood).

If it's P/S, you'd see it at those fittings.

As others have said, stick with OEM. They built the car, they designed the parts and they know the car better than any other aftermarket manufacturer taking a stab in the dark trying to fix a problem 'their' way.
 

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1991 Cadillac Sedan deVille
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530 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks. It wasn't coolant and I never thought it was. It was more of an oil, dark colored. My coolant is green and the level stays full. I am 99.9% sure it was the power steering. It wasn't that low, but I topped it off with Lucas stop leak and it hasn't leaked a drop since. It didn't start leaking until I had driven the car about 300 miles. The car only has 60k and had not been driven much. I think some of the seals had a little issue. So far no leaks. Thanks.

If it's coolant you can do a few things: Check around the clamps when the car is hot and running, get a uv dye kit off (dye, uv flashlight and glasses ~$20), pressure test the coolant system (be careful to know the psi spec of the cooling system beforehand, usually in the owners manual and/or under the hood).

If it's P/S, you'd see it at those fittings.

As others have said, stick with OEM. They built the car, they designed the parts and they know the car better than any other aftermarket manufacturer taking a stab in the dark trying to fix a problem 'their' way.
 
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