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In my weekly checking of fluids in the fleet, I find the whole top of the brake master cylinder reservoir on my '00 STS completely eaten away!

They LOVE plastic and vinyl. SOB's...trap time...l
 

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-Administrator- 2002.5 F55 STS 2014 FWD Explorer
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Some years ago they ate the entire plastic gas caps off two rotary lawnmowers....... and when Karen said "I smell gasoline" I discovered the chewed hole in the lawn tractor fuel filter.

Small Browning lever action .22, high velocity CB short hollow points (not very loud). Raccoon food.
 

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-Administrator- 2002.5 F55 STS 2014 FWD Explorer
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I think that squirrels, like other rodents, must continually bite with their front teeth to keep them shortened - the teeth continue growing for the life of the animal.
 

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My Deville had batting in the intake manifold suggesting mice or other rodents used it to den...... I took the humane approach so the problem would be solved long term rather than make space for new ones by killing them. “Poisons or traps merely make space for more rats to grow.” To prevent a rat or mouse problem, take away what makes your home attractive to them: food and shelter. Start by making sure that there is no food in open places or in cardboard containers, which rats can eat right through. Keep garbage in tightly covered containers. Next, deny them a way to enter your home by sealing holes at the bottom of walls. Of course, this means that while no rats can come in, any who are already inside can’t get out. If rats are already inside, you will need to set a trap—but be careful which one you pick. Glue traps, flat boxes with adhesive to trap rodents, should be avoided at all costs. Some animals caught in these sticky contraptions break or even bite off their own legs to get free, and the glue badly irritates and scars their eyes. Animals whose faces become stuck in the glue slowly suffocate, and all trapped animals are subject to starvation and dehydration. Nonlethal traps are widely available, inexpensive, and easy to use. Sold by most humane societies and hardware stores, the box-like plastic or metal trap has a spring-release door that closes behind the animal once he or she enters the trap. Check the trap daily, and if you find an animal, simply release him or her outside.
 
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