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2001 DeVille
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411 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The friend I sold my car too just drives it, never overheated until the last few days. It drinks coolant like a fish, used half the bottle during a 5 minute engine running pressure check. With obvious misfires. Steam prolific in exhaust during pressure check. I see misfires stored for 2 and 4 which are the front two holes on the crank pulley end. Pull the plugs and find coolant standing in those cylinders. I pulled the valve cover and checked torques all but one are still tight at 85 ft/lbs. The second one in on the bottom row is at 65. I tighten it to 85 and it holds so it's not broken. Now it leaks down ever so slowly but still put a teaspoon of coolant in number 2 in about 30 minutes at 18 psi. I'm sick and trying to decide how to handle this. I came on here to look at the techniques developed for changing the front head gasket in the car and start finding vague mentions of Carroll's studs failing somehow and he has a redesign "no more cracked blocks". What the heck happened? What am I up against? Tim talked so much trash about his competitor (who was too busy to talk to me also at the time) but apparently he never posted a video of himself drilling perfectly strait holes free hand, I know because just a few months ago a guy PM'ed me about this when he used Tim's studs and couldn't slide the heads down either. He mentioned that Tim never came back as he stated he would. I told the guy that I had to straiten them up but at least it was still holding. Now that is no longer the case, this is an obvious head gasket failure between two cylinders with one loosened up stud that were all installed professionally be me. I don't want to sit here and bitch and bash, I could care less at this point.

All I want is the truth so I can decided what to do with this mess. What's the problem that Tim's stuff had? Is it fixable?

Thanks,
Vernon
 

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2002.5 F55 CORSA STS, 2014 Explorer XLT FWD
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68,441 Posts
I would recommend that you speak directly with the manufacturer of your existing head stud set. He will have the best advice and options for your particular problems. If you did the install, given one "loose" stud, it would appear that you may not have completed a torque sequence (been there, done that) - and that is not the product manufacturer's fault. If the stud had snapped, given correct torque and alignment, different story.

Any speculation as to success or failure of a particular product is best answered by the product manufacturer.
 

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98 eldo/KD54 w/N37,T96,QA1,D55,DS3,U1Z. U3R next
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2,125 Posts
Damn.......

I know Manic you're fire engine hot......

I used CCC studs on Eldorado_red's car because that's what he had purchased almost two years ago now. (Knocking on wood) she's still running strong. Yet, I'm very anal when working on these things.

A lot can go wrong if not careful.

Hope you sort it all out........
 

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2001 GMC SLT, Malibu LTZ, 99 STS studded with NP
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499 Posts
you need to talk to tim and see what he says. that's your first move. you might be able to remove the front head and see what happened. but if it was two years ago I would drop the cradle. but talk to tim first. I usually find #1 cylinder bad and have had to change that head because of compression burn so it would never seal. I have never seen this on 2 and 4. These are just my thoughts
 

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2001 DeVille
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411 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys, I thought there would be some community knowledge of what if any was the problem with the kind of CCC studs I used. I did call Tim's number first but it was Saturday and nobody answered. Last time I called him and left a message he returned my call several days after I had called back and actually talked to him. I was just hoping for some answer during the initial shock instead of going at it blind, and the customer would always expect a full future told to them within the same day if you know what I mean.

As for the loose stud it's really unlikely I missed it in as many passes I made on each head. I'm a little over cautious with torqueing critical parts like heads. I usually make two passes at final torque and then comeback later and recheck them after some time to take a set. I was wondering if it's snapping and has yet to break in two yet. There's no way to remove them with the head on and look at it, and I used red lock-tite on the block threads. All I know it is held 85 pounds when I checked them the other day, for how long I don't know. I put the cover back on and used K&W block sealer on it by the owners request. I will see if it's going to do any good tomorrow. I'm doubtful it will work long term. There's a 1.5 year ago wrecked DeVille a few doors down from me that I will try to arrange purchase and then swap the engine from if this didn't work.

Vernon
 

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97 ETC x2, 04 GXP, 04 STS x2, 97 ESC, 99 Deville, 05 SRX
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2,603 Posts
As far as I'm concerned the stud wars are over and I prefer to keep things clean here on the forum. Peace is a good feeling. My company has had issues in the past (all start-ups will have) and challenges do arise from time to time for everyone.

Northstar Performance is open for business. We machine all of our studs from cold rolled USA bar stock that has been heat treated to our specs at a steel mill. It's more expensive this way, but the heat treat is consistent every time. If accurate, even torque is given to the studs across the head, they will ALL remain this way through the heat cycles of the engine. Threads are rolled after these 12 foot long bars are machined into the stud blanks. It's very hard on the carbide tooling, but sure makes for a nice product. As for the exact heat treat and exact composition...that's a trade secret.

Just to explain it better....most gearheads will understand- if you have too hard of a stud with no "spring" at all, you will have an engine that will crush the head gaskets with enough heat cycles. This means loosened nuts as well. If you have a cylinder head stud that's too soft, it won't maintain it's clamping pressure after enough heat cycles. There is a happy medium and a material that works EXCELLENT for this....and we are using in on a daily basis. A lot of our customers back from 2008 still report to us with good news. One from California as well who had his engine studded by us in 2009.

We've had excellent success with this, and so have our customers.

All the best Vernon.
 

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2001 DeVille
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411 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks Jake.

The K&W survived a long pressure check and then a short test drive this morning. I left most of it in to allow for a second shellacking that is taking place today. I'm hoping that if the current stud kit holds the head down the K&W can keep the gasket sealed. But we're already resigned to the likely possibility of pulling the head or engine in the near future. The current owner is a low on bucks guy, so that is a factor in the suck scale of this predicament.

Vernon
 

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2001 DeVille
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411 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Well After re-torquing and using K&W it's been a month and it still gets them back and forth. That is all.

Vernon
 
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