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2011 CTS4 Coupe, 2014 ELR, 2018 XT5 AWD
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386 Posts
I understand you guys concern but with what is at my disposal a compression fitting was my only choice. There is really nobody around me that is competent enough to do brake lines or don't want to bother. My mechanic who I use for everything does not flare brake lines nor really gets involved with brake lines period. But I am sure if I found the actual line that was damaged and found a replacement line he would install it. The guy that put the compression fitting in and found the bad line is not my regular guy, he did it in a emergency and basically did me a favor just getting the leak fixed.
You can get a flaring tool for under 30 bucks. A 2 foot long piece of brake line is only a few dollars. You could easily get everything you need to repair it safely for under 50 bucks. The second time you use it the repair would be cheaper than the compression fitting!
I understand where you are coming from. The fitting was cheap, quick and easy. I want you to understand where I am coming from. The compression fitting is not safe. It may fail at any time. If I didn't tell you that and you had a serious accident I would feel horrible. You have been warned. Personally I think your life is worth more than 50 bucks but you can decide that for yourself.
 

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2000 Deville Base, 2019 Corvette GS
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1,156 Posts
Discussion Starter #22
I have seen a ton of you tube videos on compression fittings for brake lines. I have read hundreds of comments and not ONE person who has used them or knew people who used them have ever seen a failure. There were hundreds of comments saying how unsafe they are but not one comment to back up those claims. Now I am not saying compression fittings are foolproof because I have never used one before but until I have further proof I am not worried. Heck you probably have way more of a chance of a 20 year old brake line blowing than a new compression fitting blowing.
 

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92 Fleetwood 2dr cpe - FWD, 96 Seville SLS, 02 Seville
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1,038 Posts
Here ya go
  • must compression fittings are rated for water, gas, vapour and other fluids in the 400psi or less range. Brake hydraulics can reach 2000psi with a hard stomp.
  • compression fittings require a limited torque so as to not deform the ferrule or pipe. Too tight causes the contact surface area to shrink reducing the psi capability. In a vibration environment, the reduced torque might allow a connection to loosen. A locking mechanism would be needed (ie wire strung thru bolt heads as on race cars)
  • there are higher rated compression fittings, but these require adherence to material and preparation specification - something unlikely with an old brake line.
 

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2000 Deville Base, 2019 Corvette GS
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1,156 Posts
Discussion Starter #24
Here ya go
  • must compression fittings are rated for water, gas, vapour and other fluids in the 400psi or less range. Brake hydraulics can reach 2000psi with a hard stomp.
  • compression fittings require a limited torque so as to not deform the ferrule or pipe. Too tight causes the contact surface area to shrink reducing the psi capability. In a vibration environment, the reduced torque might allow a connection to loosen. A locking mechanism would be needed (ie wire strung thru bolt heads as on race cars)
  • there are higher rated compression fittings, but these require adherence to material and preparation specification - something unlikely with an old brake line.
All well and good and I am not doubting what you say, all I'm saying is nobody has posted evidence where a compression fitting has failed on a brake line. That I would like to see. Like I said some of my brake lines are 20 years rusted, some I had replaced. At this point I would trust the compression fitting more than the actual brake lines. The car is 20 years old, I can't start replacing everything that is rusted or that might break do to age. The compression fitting so far was my ONLY option. If I can find the actual brake line that I put this fitting on, sure I will replace it.
 

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2003 DTS
'03 Deville DTS
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285 Posts
. The compression fitting so far was my ONLY option. If I can find the actual brake line that I put this fitting on, sure I will replace it.
Buy a roll of the the copper/nickel lines and a good flare tool and make them yourself. Stuff is phenomenal, you can bend it with your fingers it will not kink and it never rusts.

DJSG3
 

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2011 CTS4 Coupe, 2014 ELR, 2018 XT5 AWD
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386 Posts
Let me repeat the main premise of my post.
For under $50 USD you can buy all the tools and materials to do the job correctly. For under $100 you could buy everything required to replace every inch of brake line on the vehicle.
As far as the internet reviews go let me ask you this. If your compression line repair fails are you going to come back here and update this thread saying so?
 

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2000 Deville Base, 2019 Corvette GS
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1,156 Posts
Discussion Starter #27 (Edited)
Let me repeat the main premise of my post.
For under $50 USD you can buy all the tools and materials to do the job correctly. For under $100 you could buy everything required to replace every inch of brake line on the vehicle.
As far as the internet reviews go let me ask you this. If your compression line repair fails are you going to come back here and update this thread saying so?
Why wouldn't I. Look at my history, I am not a newbie here and any project I undertake here I always post my results unlike other people who ask a question about a problem and you never here from them again wondering whatever happened to his problem. I am the last guy who wouldn't admit failure on here because it serves no purpose for other members by not admitting it. As far as replacing the rusted brake lines on my car, it will never happen. I don't have the means (lift, tools, etc.) to do that.
 
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