Cadillac Owners Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
98 Seville sts. It was raining really hard last night. I went out to the car this morning (still raining hard by the way) and the car was sitting in a water puddle that was about 1/3 the height of the tire.

Started the car up and it ran fine. My gas level was low, so I went to the gas station. Filled up with Premium and decided to put some HEET in there. Started the car up and it died twice before I left the station. I revved the engine for about 3 minutes, and then drove off. Then while I was driving there was a VERRRY significant loss of power. At idle it was quiet and calm. No check engine light or anything, just a loss of power.

Power was crispy clean before this. What has happened?
 

·
Super Moderator
White Diamond '03 DHS (with DTS floor shift)
Joined
·
86,996 Posts
Not sure what happened, but I suspect it was self inflicted. Don't use any additives. Why did you add Heet in the first place?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Not sure what happened, but I suspect it was self inflicted. Don't use any additives. Why did you add Heet in the first place?
I've had similar problems a couple of years ago with it stalling on me at idle on rainy days. The solution was adding a water remover to the tank. It worked fine then but I do remember that I used a different brand that was to be used specifically on premium fuel cars. This time I just used the HEET bottle I saw in the trunk. But I guess that's what the problem is. I will see what happens when I burn this tank down and refill with no extra stuff.
 

·
Premium Member
2006 STS V8 AWD, '95 Ford Ranger
Joined
·
28,974 Posts
The tank has a sump area where water can collect but isn't drawn into the fuel line. Assume there is some amount of water there already. It's just sitting and does no harm. Add some HEET or other alcohol mixture. It runs to the sump and increases the volume of the water enough so that now this stuff can make it to the fuel pickup. Instead of running on gasoline your car is now running on a mixture of dirty watery crap and HEET. The road to hell is paved with good intentions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
The tank has a sump area where water can collect but isn't drawn into the fuel line. Assume there is some amount of water there already. It's just sitting and does no harm. Add some HEET or other alcohol mixture. It runs to the sump and increases the volume of the water enough so that now this stuff can make it to the fuel pickup. Instead of running on gasoline your car is now running on a mixture of dirty watery crap and HEET. The road to hell is paved with good intentions.
I already admitted my mistake of adding the stuff. Bad decision. I have no other choice but to wait until all of it leaves the system. If the car still has half power after that then I have to take it to the repair shop.
 

·
Premium Member
2006 STS V8 AWD, '95 Ford Ranger
Joined
·
28,974 Posts
I wasn't trying to get on your case as much as I was trying to explain the mechanism of the problem. After the bad stuff gets burned off you'll probably be OK.
 

·
Super Moderator
White Diamond '03 DHS (with DTS floor shift)
Joined
·
86,996 Posts
If you are in an area that uses 10% ethanol, you already have almost 2 gallons of water absorbing alcohol in a full tank. No need for any additives.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I wasn't trying to get on your case as much as I was trying to explain the mechanism of the problem. After the bad stuff gets burned off you'll probably be OK.
No problem man :) I will dig for this thread once it gets burned off and let everyone know the deal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Just a follow-up..the HEET was the problem as Dkoz and Ranger stated. Bad decision on my part to use what I saw in the trunk. I wouldn't say fuel line cleaner is "bad" tho. Gas tank ran out, refilled with premium, all is well and having a ball with the car ;-)
 

·
Premium Member
2006 STS V8 AWD, '95 Ford Ranger
Joined
·
28,974 Posts
Not common knowledge is the fact that microbes can live very well in petroleum products and automotive fuel that is contaminated by water. The white sludge and deposits commonly found in fuels systems and filters and mistaken for corrosion is the digestion products of bacteria/algae. A product called Prist (Diethylene glycol monomethyl ether) is added to aviation turbine fuels to prevent freezeups and bacteria/algae growth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
Not common knowledge is the fact that microbes can live very well in petroleum products and automotive fuel that is contaminated by water. The white sludge and deposits commonly found in fuels systems and filters and mistaken for corrosion is the digestion products of bacteria/algae. A product called Prist (Diethylene glycol monomethyl ether) is added to aviation turbine fuels to prevent freezeups and bacteria/algae growth.
You're absolutely correct. (and thanks for that explanation of the sump area, earlier in the thread).
As a motorcycle mechanic I encountered this sludge problem often, because bikes with partly-full tanks of gasoline are left sitting (sometimes for years), more often than cars I think. Then they're run, and totally clog up the carbuerator. We never used Prist, since that product seems to be specifically for preventing fuel icing at high altitudes, but several other products containing some form of isopropyl alcohol. Now, what effect these may have on fuel lines and other non-metal parts, I'm not sure but certainly there must be some diissenting debate on this practice. Maybe dkozloski can shed some light on this, as he seems to know much more about this topic than I do.
 

·
Administrator
2002.5 F55 CORSA STS, 2014 Explorer XLT FWD
Joined
·
69,133 Posts
Again, go to the BoatUS website and surf for the horror stories on ethanol supplemented fuels. Your government is lying to you at the request of the corn lobby.
 

·
Premium Member
2006 STS V8 AWD, '95 Ford Ranger
Joined
·
28,974 Posts
You're absolutely correct. (and thanks for that explanation of the sump area, earlier in the thread).
As a motorcycle mechanic I encountered this sludge problem often, because bikes with partly-full tanks of gasoline are left sitting (sometimes for years), more often than cars I think. Then they're run, and totally clog up the carbuerator. We never used Prist, since that product seems to be specifically for preventing fuel icing at high altitudes, but several other products containing some form of isopropyl alcohol. Now, what effect these may have on fuel lines and other non-metal parts, I'm not sure but certainly there must be some diissenting debate on this practice. Maybe dkozloski can shed some light on this, as he seems to know much more about this topic than I do.
More important than the chemistry of the alcohol added to your gas tank is the idea that it must be very dry. All alcohols contain water. In a humid climate 100% alcohol to the rim of a glass will absorb enough water from the atmosphere to overflow. Only a very small amount is required. Alcohol dumped in the tank will go to the lowest part of the tank and combine with the water to make it barely combustible. Prist fuel additive readily combines with water and much less with fuel. It mixes with the fuel in the tank but readily leaves the fuel to combine with the water to prevent gasline freezeups. If you have water in your gastank the best thing to do is drain it out.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top