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94' Seville STS
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Discussion Starter #1
Okay soo after tons of maint. on my 94' it has started leaking at the case half and it's not that bad but it's kinda annoying. Is there a easier way to seal it without removing the entire engine? I would think that you should be able to drain the oil and let it sit for awhile. Scrape it with a gasket scraper and spray it with brake cleaner to get the residue off and then smear some RTV sealant over and into the crack and let it completely dry. Then after hours of drying time it should hold a seal correct? It should be good to fill back up and drive around.

Is this the only way?
 

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White Diamond '03 DHS (with DTS floor shift)
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Your method is about the ONLY other option. Might slow it down some.
 

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94' Seville STS
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Discussion Starter #6
Well then maybe thats what I'll do. The engine runs like brand new just tuned it all up and had the entire cooling system replaced and the oil changed with some Castrol GTX High Mileage since it now has 165k miles. I just have to fix this little problem and recharge the A/C and it's good to go for awhile.
 

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1993 Cadillac STS 4.6L N*
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the reason it is said not to use the rtv sealant is becuase it can clog the holes where the oil sprays the engine bearings when the sealnt eventually breaks down, it sounds like a good quick repair but a professional repair is always the way to go. i also have a leaky case half and have read up on it many times, gm actaully now makes a proper gasket for a more permanent seal.
 

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White Diamond '03 DHS (with DTS floor shift)
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This is just seepage. The RTV will never work it's way into the engine. It CAN cause problems if you use it to seal the case halves when separating them.
 

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94' Seville STS
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Discussion Starter #11
Yeah I justy don't feel like pulling the engine right now. I just want to keep the driveway clean and oil inside the engine. RTV def cant make it's way into the engine. I was just worried the RTV might not stick to the block because of oil residue.
 

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2006 STS V8 AWD, '95 Ford Ranger
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Yeah I justy don't feel like pulling the engine right now. I just want to keep the driveway clean and oil inside the engine. RTV def cant make it's way into the engine. I was just worried the RTV might not stick to the block because of oil residue.
Drain the engine completely and clean up the leaky area with brake clean. Put a vacuum cleaner on the oil fill neck and pull a vacuum in the engine. With the vacuum still running clean the outside some more. Paint the engine seams with aircraft fuel tank sloshing compound and let it sit for a few minutes. Remove the vacuum cleaner and let the whole works sit over night.
This is how you fix pinhole leaks in aircraft floats and it ought to work for an engine.
 

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94' Seville STS
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Discussion Starter #13
As in a Shop Vac or standard home vaccuum with attatchment? IS this just to keep the oil from soaking through? After the oil is drained do I put the drain plug back in then use the Vaccuum? Also where can I get aircraft fuel tank sloshing compound? Doesn't sound like something I can pick up from Autozone or Walmart.
 

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2006 STS V8 AWD, '95 Ford Ranger
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As in a Shop Vac or standard home vaccuum with attatchment? IS this just to keep the oil from soaking through? After the oil is drained do I put the drain plug back in then use the Vaccuum? Also where can I get aircraft fuel tank sloshing compound? Doesn't sound like something I can pick up from Autozone or Walmart.
The type of vacuum doesn't matter. Put the drain plug back in. The vacuum pulls the sealer into the crack so it isn't just sitting on the outside. The tank sealer is sold by aircraft parts houses. Go to a general aviation airport and ask for the parts places. Look in the Yellow Pages. There are probably a lot of different sealers that can be used but I know the tank sealer works.
 

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pulling a vac on the motor is so much over kill, none of that is needed for this....he just has a small leak that wicks out when the block is hot....a cold drained motor will not be prone to leakage...after you drain the pan and clean the block just let it sit over night...on the odd chance that there was a drop or a smudge of oil on the car just spray it and wipe it down real quick...then just throw the hi-temp rtv and and call it a day...it sets up in like 10 mins and is ready to drive in an hour....just put it on like i mentioned with a 1/4 inch over the leak and u will be good to go..

dont use anything other then hi-temp rtv it is the industry standard....the day of the formed material gasket is long dead.
 

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68 DVC, 96 FLTWD Brgm, 11 CTS Premium (two)
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GM changed over to RTV sealant somewher in the late 90s on new engines so you's not doing anything that GM didn't already do on their newer versions of the NorthStar. no more oil pan or case half gaskets.

Didn't stop my 2000 Eldorado from starting to seep though...
 

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they seep from the factory because of the pressure in the block and gm being cheap with that rtv...the right amount and a better rtv would solve many of the caddy's short comings....but if they did that then what would we have left to fix...lol:want:
 

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White Diamond '03 DHS (with DTS floor shift)
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FWIW, I can tell you that a shop vac will not pull much vacuum. I made a reducer for mine to power bleed brakes. It is a plug that goes into the shop vac hose with a small nipple on the end that I plug an 1/8" vacuum hose onto (basically a reducer). It barely would draw brake fluid so I hooked it up to a vacuum gauge to see what it would pull. Barely 2 lbs.
 

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2006 STS V8 AWD, '95 Ford Ranger
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FWIW, I can tell you that a shop vac will not pull much vacuum. I made a reducer for mine to power bleed brakes. It is a plug that goes into the shop vac hose with a small nipple on the end that I plug an 1/8" vacuum hose onto (basically a reducer). It barely would draw brake fluid so I hooked it up to a vacuum gauge to see what it would pull. Barely 2 lbs.
When you're repairing aircraft floats you can see the sealing compound being drawn right into the seams. If you turn the vacuum cleaner around, pressurize the float, and spray on a little soapy water the bubbles show the leaks. I use a felt tip pen to mark them. I've been doing it for forty years.
 
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