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2004 CTS-V 457ci LS7
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Discussion Starter #1
As promised I did the driver's side brake duct install today.

As a caveat I'll state the following:

Make no illusions... This install will absolutely rub if you bring the wheel to full lock. I've done a couple 120 degree turns (wheel 1-1/4ish full turns) with no rubbing. However if you sit in a parking lot at full lock driving in a circle you'll destroy the hose.

However, if you track you car I highly recommend it. I haven't tracked it yet with this install but I measured rotors temps when I only had my passenger side on. The rotor temp after very brief spirited low speed driving was 60-100 degrees cooler on the ducted rotor. EVEN if you can't deal with the idea of the hose rubbing you can always install the spindle plate and then run cheap 3.5 inch dryer hose on track day. I can't imagine it rubbing at the track since the steering wheel is never really past 1/2 a turn... unless you're at Monaco and having to deal with the Loews hairpin. But if you're racing you car at Monaco you have no sympathy from me :p

On to the pics, since that's what you're here for.

Picture 1
Get your hub assembly to look like this. Remove wheel, remove caliper, remove rotor, remove hub. There are a ton of write-ups that can get you to this point.

Picture 2
This is the C5 Z06 spindle plate that I started with. You will remove the stock plate that holds the ABS wire and replace it with this plate. (Just loosely zip tie the ABS wire to the end-link when you are done) As you can see, the 3 holes that were drilled in the plate weren't in the right places for the V. Drilling the right holes is a piece of cake. Just place the plate against the hub and mark the holes from behind with a sharpie. The holes don't need to be exactly the right size as long as all 3 hub bolts can get through.

Picture 3
Since the V's brake calipers are infinitely superior to those of the C5 Z06 ;) you need to cut away some of the spindle plate. The Xs are where the caliper bolts would hit the plate if installed like this. (Trust me... I did it on the other side) The line is where I cut.

Picture 4
Any excuse to use your dremel is a good one. If you don't have a dremel then your tool box isn't complete.

Picture 5
With the spindle plate done it's time to run the hose. Step 1, remove the wheel well. There are about 5-6 plastic bolt/pins that need to be removed with a flat head screwdriver.

Picture 6
This is how I attached the 3.5 inch silicone hose to the front stock inlet. 2 hose clamps are probably overkill... but I had them.

Picture 7
This is a very technical move called "squeezing the hose to make it flat". What this accomplishes is getting the hose flatter to avoid rubbing. It's tough to write a walk-through about this since a lot of it is just looking at it and figuring out how much you need to flatten.
This is the part that could be eliminated if someone awesome out there could mold a plastic vent similar to the DRM vette kits. But it's have to be super thin.

Picture 8
Here's the hose thinned down and zip-tied to something back there (I think it was part of the frame. I used 2 x 11 inch zip ties connected together. I suggest you get a bag of 50-100... you can never have too many zip ties.

Picture 9
Wheel well lining reinstalled. Again, this is a part done "by feel" You will have to cut a hole in the liner to allow the hose to pass through. I just used a razor to cut the liner. The goal is to get the liner to reattach in as stock of a position as possible since there is SOOOO little room in the wheel well. This will help eliminate rubbing.

Picture 10
Attach the hose to the spindle plate. Since both the hose and the plate I used are 3.5 inches the hose doesn't want to attach. I just removed about 2-3 inches of the metal wire inside so that I was left with just silicone hose. That stretches better than metal wire. Durrr...



This is just a work in progress. As you all know by now if you've done any sort of non-typical modding, unlike the Vette guys you can't just call up someone and order something off the shelf without having to cut, grind or hack it.

If anyone decides to do this and can suggest something better please let me know. I use my V as a daily driver so I'll be posting how the hoses hold up. My guess is that 3-4 months of daily driving is all they will be able to take due to the random U-turn.

Again, once the spindle plates are installed they are there for good. IF you destroy the hose you can always pick up some cheap dryer hose from Home Depot/Lowes and install it in 15 min per side at the track... at the same time that you're changing your street tires for your R-comps ;)
 

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i like man! might have to check this out for myself... (i gotta track this beast 1st) lol
 

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That looks pretty good. I imagine it's too late to ask now, but do you have any pics from the back with the rotor installed so we can see how the duct, rotor, and caliper all line up?

Thanks for the write-up!
 

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2004 CTS-V 457ci LS7
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Discussion Starter #5
Sorry... no pics from behind. Not sure I could get enough room for my camera to focus.

However I'll have to take it all apart again soon anyways since my Carbotech pads just came in. I'll have to pull the calipers to change the pads and rotors off to wire brush them.

I'll try to get some more pics at that point.

The picture below is from when I did the passenger side. It's not from behind but the rotor and caliper are back on so maybe this will help a little.

BTW, the driver's and passenger side are a little different as far as where you can run the hosing. The driver's side was much easier imo. On the passenger side I actually ended up dremling a little bit of plastic off what I believe is the housing for the headlight washer (I could be dead wrong on that).
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Nice catch... :yup:

I actually took a couple more pics without my foot in it and then figured... what the heck. Let's be honest... if that thing comes down on your foot a pair of sneakers ain't gonna do squat. The only issue I had was that I replaced my end links for the C5 Z06 end links while I had everything apart. Those metal shavings from drilling are hot when they land on your foot. :O

But overall, when you have to sit on the ground for an hour or so it's just more comfortable... it does make getting up and walking to the fridge for beers a little bit of a pain, which is why I always make sure to get 2 while I'm up. :thumbsup:
 

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Nice job
 

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2004 CTS-V 457ci LS7
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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks!

One thing I forgot to mention.

Make sure you don't zip tie the hose too tightly to the sway bar (oh yeah... btw, I zip tied it to the sway bar) with the wheel straight. When it came to using the zip ties I actually turned the wheel to full left lock (drivers side) and then attached it. If you zip tie it too tightly at center then the hose will be too stressed at lock.
 

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If you cut the hose where it enters the wheel well and have some sort of quick connect while at the track, you'd have no worries in crushing the hose on the street...
 

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Discussion Starter #11
There's a couple issues I could see with that idea.

First, the hose enters the wheel well in an already flattened state. Therefore the coupling would have to be an oval shaped connector. Not impossible, but more difficult to find than a round coupler.

The more important issue is what is the true gain from doing that? Removing the wheel well liner is literally a 1-2 minute job once you've done it one time. The wheel would really need to be off anyways to have enough room to work back there.

As a side note I drove around all day and even brought the wheel about 1.5 times around to pull into and out of a parking spot. No visible rubbing at all.
 

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I have yet to get into my fender, or behind my bumper...Where does that air-inlet usually lead to? Or does it even feed anyting normally?
 

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Man, that's a great setup!

I wonder if you could make a PVC pipe work? (Like where you say the hose will be destroyed at full lock) Make the angle go far enough away from the tire possibly? Maybe there's not enough room, just a thought.

Regardless.....good job!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I have yet to get into my fender, or behind my bumper...Where does that air-inlet usually lead to? Or does it even feed anyting normally?
There's a bit of hard plastic tubing that leads from the stock inlet to a hole in the wheel well. You can see it just enter the front of the wheel well in front of the wheel.

Maybe the GM engineers thought it would accomplish something and I'm sure they did tests... but the stock setup is totally pointless imo. It's almost just there to say that there are brake ducts.
 

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Or use the hose and roll it back just behind the front duct like an accordion. Then roll it out attach it when switching over to race rubber and pads...
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Man, that's a great setup!

I wonder if you could make a PVC pipe work? (Like where you say the hose will be destroyed at full lock) Make the angle go far enough away from the tire possibly? Maybe there's not enough room, just a thought.

Regardless.....good job!
I really, really, really don't think there's enough room in the wheel well to get it to not rub at all. The additional problem that PVC pipe would introduce is the fact that it cannot be flattened.

The vettes use a molded piece of plastic called the DRM kit. It's the top piece in the pic I've attached. As you can see it flattens out where it would enter the wheel well.

My friend has a C5 Z06 and just installed the kit. I haven't asked him if it rubs at lock but I'm sure he tested it.

It really blows my mind that the CTS-V has less room in the wheel well than the Vette.

FYI... Another day with some tight turns and no rubbing on the hose. I might go to a parking lot and take along a "spotter" and see at what point the wheel rubs.

As a side note I checked dryer hose pricing at Home Depot while I was up there today. I think 25 feet of 4 inch hose was about $15 and it only takes about 3-4 feet per side to run the line. Better than the multi-$ cost per foot of silicone hose.
 

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How about two of those DRM kit pieces (the molded part) and maybe cut/glue the flattened pieces together? Sure it would be ugly, but who's going to see it?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
How about two of those DRM kit pieces (the molded part) and maybe cut/glue the flattened pieces together? Sure it would be ugly, but who's going to see it?
The issue with that idea is that the DRM kits aren't exactly cheap. I think they are about $200ish PER set. So to ATTEMPT both sides it'd be in the $400ish range. And that's just to give it a try to see if it might work.

I think using a heat gun on some plastic tubing and molding it myself might be a more realistic solution. Maybe I'll give that a shot sometime, although honestly the hose is holding up beautifully. No sign of rubbing at all so far.

And I've got a rear diff catch can to install for my Ford 9 inch rear end as well as an oil cooler that I need get plumbed. The brake ducts might have to be done for now.

Anyone in the Atlanta area with a lift that I can use for a day or three?
 
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