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2002 F55 STS, 2014 Explorer XLT, F-150
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They're great vehicles but spare parts are practically non-existent, even in the U.S.. Hand-wash only and pray that the top mechanism works.
 

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96 FWB
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That's unusually low kilometerage. As mentioned, the top is a known design flub. Searches on this forum will help to start a list of other common failure points and NLA no longer available parts for that particular (exquisite) model.
 

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1999 STS, 84 Seville, 93 FWB, 47 Nash, 2017 Corvette, 99 Z28, 85 Trans Am
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If you plan to drive it only on good dry days and not on dirt roads use a waterless cleaner. If it's only dust then don't use water. Go to Shine Supply (many suppliers out there) on the net and get their Eco Shine. You spray it on and wipe it off with microfiber cloth. Then get the heavier stuff with some other cleaners they have that won't hurt the car. I am a firm believer in never washing a collector car with water and especially with high pressure water. Water will settle in the cracks with dirt and start the corrosion process. I've owned small airplanes and I try to tell other airplane owners not to use water and not to use especially high pressure to clean their airplanes, because of the damage water will do. Water will get inside the aircraft structure and start corrosion. Same thing will happen to a car. Never go to a high-pressure car wash for any of your vehicles. Use high pressure for only the undercarriage if it gets muddy or to remove salty road grime. The drive thru car washes are just as bad, and even violent to an automobile. I cringe when I see people holding a high-pressure wand inches from a painted surface.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That's unusually low kilometerage. As mentioned, the top is a known design flub. Searches on this forum will help to start a list of other common failure points and NLA no longer available parts for that particular (exquisite) model.

Are there still spare parts for your Cadillac? Or what about the Corvette C6?
 

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96 FWB
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Fortunately yes. The accumulation of all U.S. Big 3 automakers for decades using basically the same body-on-frame engineering and similar RWD drivetrains and suspension, resulted in commonality and parts interchange for the majority of parts which extends not just between the numerous brands within 'The Old General' but even to the extent that common mods for my cars even include suspension and drivetrain pieces off a Mercury. It's tougher finding other than strait-up unibody vehicles built nowadays, but for anyone tooling around in a quarter-century old tub the pickings are easier, and both aftermarket and repro markets are robust for proven popular models as the venerable Fleetwood. The tech is quite low on mine with just an ecm and a 'Convenience Control Module', so repairs and replacements are simpler mechanical and cosmetic for the most part. And there's enough enthusiasts and businesses rounding up anything still available so that you can at least get most anything needed even if it wounds your wallet.
Not so the case with the poor XLR. A seriously regrettable short-lived 'One Run and Done', loaded with bespoke one-off tech, and not enough sold to gain a toe-hold with the repro crowd. And definitely an unresearched opinion of mine, but still a lot tougher row to hoe for your ride just as long as you're prepared for it. The bright spot is that as a lo km use, good weather only hobby you've made an excellent pick. And if the one pictured is yours, it's a beautiful color. I think it was called 'Light Firemist Met.' ???? on my '84 Riviera.

As far as Vettes, the C6 is packed with performance and a panty-dropper for sure. And if you're interested in parts availability you'll be overloaded with options. But if given the opportunity I'd tilt to replacing the early C3 I had almost a half century ago.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Fortunately yes. The accumulation of all U.S. Big 3 automakers for decades using basically the same body-on-frame engineering and similar RWD drivetrains and suspension, resulted in commonality and parts interchange for the majority of parts which extends not just between the numerous brands within 'The Old General' but even to the extent that common mods for my cars even include suspension and drivetrain pieces off a Mercury. It's tougher finding other than strait-up unibody vehicles built nowadays, but for anyone tooling around in a quarter-century old tub the pickings are easier, and both aftermarket and repro markets are robust for proven popular models as the venerable Fleetwood. The tech is quite low on mine with just an ecm and a 'Convenience Control Module', so repairs and replacements are simpler mechanical and cosmetic for the most part. And there's enough enthusiasts and businesses rounding up anything still available so that you can at least get most anything needed even if it wounds your wallet.
Not so the case with the poor XLR. A seriously regrettable short-lived 'One Run and Done', loaded with bespoke one-off tech, and not enough sold to gain a toe-hold with the repro crowd. And definitely an unresearched opinion of mine, but still a lot tougher row to hoe for your ride just as long as you're prepared for it. The bright spot is that as a lo km use, good weather only hobby you've made an excellent pick. And if the one pictured is yours, it's a beautiful color. I think it was called 'Light Firemist Met.' ???? on my '84 Riviera.

As far as Vettes, the C6 is packed with performance and a panty-dropper for sure. And if you're interested in parts availability you'll be overloaded with options. But if given the opportunity I'd tilt to replacing the early C3 I had almost a half century ago.
Thanks for the info I love the XLR but I'm torn, would you dare buy an XLR if you drive 1500km in a year?
 

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Thanks for the info I love the XLR but I'm torn, would you dare buy an XLR if you drive 1500km in a year?
For the conditions and use you're intending I would pick strongly consider it over a lot of other options. What I was driving at above is as long as you are aware of the car's 'uniqueness' in terms of sparse parts, the rather few occasions you'll be driving it for things to wear or break is a big plus and stacks things more in your favor. You sure won't see that many others there like it. But since you brought up a Vette I consider it would be cheaper to purchase and maintain. But a lot more common and recognizable everywhere based on production numbers of each, or, less unique.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
For the conditions and use you're intending I would pick strongly consider it over a lot of other options. What I was driving at above is as long as you are aware of the car's 'uniqueness' in terms of sparse parts, the rather few occasions you'll be driving it for things to wear or break is a big plus and stacks things more in your favor. You sure won't see that many others there like it. But since you brought up a Vette I consider it would be cheaper to purchase and maintain. But a lot more common and recognizable everywhere based on production numbers of each, or, less unique.
I'll look at it on Friday, it's 380km away from me, I'll drive to Brobe and then I'll decide, it costs 28,800 euros, 32,000km, I'm curious how I'll decide
 

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You caught me just before a shower. ;) Briefly, get the VIN before the trip and pay to have Compnine provide a detailed description of the car. Offer to pay a trustworthy local GM dealer to run a complete service record, complete with any/all TSB'es and recalls performed, along with any repairs and normal service work. It is more more complete and reliable than a Carfax Report or whatever the equivalent is over your way.
Basically, research, research, and....., you guessed it. I always like to know if the seller has a history with the car, or just doing a quick flip. Ask if they kept service records, and then gauge the response as much as the info. And I'm sure you know all the customary ways prior work gets attempted to be hidden - 'too new' looking anything that's not on a service report. Invest in a 50$ OBDII reader dongle and a 30$ app for your phone to easily pull any history and/or current codes. I had a guy try to sell me a car and it turned out the MIL was 'missing', which was easy to see if it does not come on when key is first turned to 'ON'.
My favorite saying is, "I'm buying the car, not the price." Good luck in the hunt. Without knowing how long it has been for sale, just keep in mind if it turns out a real creampuff it might disappear before the weekend.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You caught me just before a shower. ;) Briefly, get the VIN before the trip and pay to have Compnine provide a detailed description of the car. Offer to pay a trustworthy local GM dealer to run a complete service record, complete with any/all TSB'es and recalls performed, along with any repairs and normal service work. It is more more complete and reliable than a Carfax Report or whatever the equivalent is over your way.
Basically, research, research, and....., you guessed it. I always like to know if the seller has a history with the car, or just doing a quick flip. Ask if they kept service records, and then gauge the response as much as the info. And I'm sure you know all the customary ways prior work gets attempted to be hidden - 'too new' looking anything that's not on a service report. Invest in a 50$ OBDII reader dongle and a 30$ app for your phone to easily pull any history and/or current codes. I had a guy try to sell me a car and it turned out the MIL was 'missing', which was easy to see if it does not come on when key is first turned to 'ON'.
My favorite saying is, "I'm buying the car, not the price." Good luck in the hunt. Without knowing how long it has been for sale, just keep in mind if it turns out a real creampuff it might disappear before the weekend.
The XLR is a Europe model, so the VIN doesn't work, it's only for the USA, it doesn't have a B+ service booklet, the tires are like new from 2011, I'll test drive it and go to the TÜV and have it checked out if everything is ok
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
You caught me just before a shower. ;) Briefly, get the VIN before the trip and pay to have Compnine provide a detailed description of the car. Offer to pay a trustworthy local GM dealer to run a complete service record, complete with any/all TSB'es and recalls performed, along with any repairs and normal service work. It is more more complete and reliable than a Carfax Report or whatever the equivalent is over your way.
Basically, research, research, and....., you guessed it. I always like to know if the seller has a history with the car, or just doing a quick flip. Ask if they kept service records, and then gauge the response as much as the info. And I'm sure you know all the customary ways prior work gets attempted to be hidden - 'too new' looking anything that's not on a service report. Invest in a 50$ OBDII reader dongle and a 30$ app for your phone to easily pull any history and/or current codes. I had a guy try to sell me a car and it turned out the MIL was 'missing', which was easy to see if it does not come on when key is first turned to 'ON'.
My favorite saying is, "I'm buying the car, not the price." Good luck in the hunt. Without knowing how long it has been for sale, just keep in mind if it turns out a real creampuff it might disappear before the weekend.
What would the XLR 2006 with 32000km with appraisal B + cost in the USA
 
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