Cadillac Owners Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
1985 Eldorado Biarritz Convertible, Sable Black, HT4100
Joined
·
1,084 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys, my A/C needs a recharge. It's been converted to R134a. I'm aware of the UV dye kits for finding leaks, but I'm not sure I need that yet since the A/C worked semi-recently... though not well.

Gonna try to do it myself. No idea what I'm doing. But other posts on CF include comments about staying away from sealers/leak-fix types of refrigerant. So I will avoid those.

At first, I was going to buy an all-in-one with a reusable gauge/hose like this for $30:
https://www.walmart.com/ip/A-C-Pro-Ultra-Synthetic-R-134a-Refrigerant-Recharge-Kit-20-OZ/353326131

But instinct tells me I'd be better off overall buying a separate, sturdier-looking hose and gauge like this for $15:
Amazon.com: EZ Chill EZC110-4 Car Air Conditioner Hose and Gauge for R134A Refrigerant, Recharge Kit for Cars & Trucks & More, Reusable: Automotive

And then just buy cans of R134a, like this, from NAPA etc.:
Amazon.com: ZeroR R134a Refrigerant for MVAC use in a 12oz Self-Sealing Container (3 Pack): Automotive

Am I on target? Thanks!
 

·
Registered
92 Fleetwood 2dr cpe - FWD, 96 Seville SLS, 02 Seville
Joined
·
977 Posts
If you are getting into the AC business, get a full set of guages. An intro set:


They will provide a better tool for diagnosing problems. You can add a self sealing tap for the cans from a local auto part store (which also carry the guages , but typically at $70-100)
 

·
Registered
1985 Eldorado Biarritz Convertible, Sable Black, HT4100
Joined
·
1,084 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Sefiro. Appreciate it. That appears to be deeper into the AC biz than I planned on going. I didn't even realize there were two ports... Okay, I'll figure things out a bit and report back.
 

·
Registered
1999 Eldorado 1983 Seville
Joined
·
145 Posts
Hi guys, my A/C needs a recharge. It's been converted to R134a. I'm aware of the UV dye kits for finding leaks, but I'm not sure I need that yet since the A/C worked semi-recently... though not well.
Gonna try to do it myself. No idea what I'm doing. But other posts on CF include comments about staying away from sealers/leak-fix types of refrigerant. So I will avoid those.
Scott... If the A/C worked as you noted you have to check the system thoroughly before just adding more refrigerant, which is not a cure for not working correctly. Why waste money on putting more R134 into the system without determining if there is a leak in it? Sure, you can put a dye into it along with the R134 to see if there is a leak, but If the deterioration in A/C in the car is over a long time, you might have failures in the hoses, filter, compressor, expansion valve, accumulator, etc. Save yourself some time (and possible money) and have a vacuum pulled it it. If this is the original system that has not been serviced before, that is the best way to go. Although you might be able to rent a vacuum pump and a set of gauges from one of the box stores and check it yourself. If there is a leak, you can then attend to repairs and we can fumble through helping you DIY.

Actually repairing the A/C is not a humongous undertaking and can be done at home without too much of a problem if you understand the system and can turn wrenches. Too many people are afraid of it but it is rather simple when you understand the basics and take your time. Noting your posts, you have undertaken more complicated projects in the past and lived to tell about it, so why not this?
 

·
Registered
1985 Eldorado Biarritz Convertible, Sable Black, HT4100
Joined
·
1,084 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks Scooter. Why would I half-ass it? Because I'm lazy. And this is more of a want than a need. I rarely use the A/C with the convertible. I'm gonna spend the $25 on a gauged can and see if that'll get the A/C through the summer. Evidently some A/C Pro brand cans include some lube in the refrigerant for seals, rather than gooey leak stopper. I'll try that, cross my fingers it's a slow leak, and then deal with it more thoroughly in the fall or spring. I think that seems like a good way to dip my toe in the water with the A/C biz and familiarize myself with the system; it's worth it to me. Even when the A/C worked, it seemed like it needed a recharge because the cooling was just okay.

My "needs" To-Do list includes rear air shocks, OE riveted ball joints, control arm bushings, brake hoses, tune up... crap, forgot about that trunk lid switch. For example, if that air shock system turns out to have real problems, I'd do a deep dive into that and fix it right. But I'm happy to phone it in with the A/C for now.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top