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1964 Fleetwood
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Hello all! This is my first post, just found out about this forum. I currently own a 1964 Fleetwood as my summer cruiser. My 1996 Fleetwood has been my daily driver since 2013, it only has about 125,000 miles on it and by ziebarting yearly very minimal rust. Unfortunately, I was t-boned by a suburban running a red light. Car is absolutely mangled. My aunt recently gave up driving and offered me her 1988 Fleetwood. She lives in Texas, so it is completely rust free. If I throw on some snow tires and spray the undercarriage, would I be able to expect a similar driving experience as I had in my 1996 during winter? She’s done all the maintenance as her husband was meticulous about maintaining their vehicles. Just at 94 years old, she prefers to let others do the driving now! Thanks for your time!
 

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95 FWB 81SDV 96 FWB 94 Fleetwood
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It's going to hard to beat your 96 fleetwood. The 88 has about half the power as the 96 and you won't be cruising at 80 mph down the highway.
 

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In the 80's would bounce around model names on different bodies.
Then they would also swap the lettering code between boddies.

An example was the Olds Cutlass. In 1977 it was the Americas best selling car.
By the 80's to early 90's the Cutlass name was on A, B, G, N & W bodies.
Most with a version of a 2 door, 4 door, & some station wagon & convertibles.
Cimbined they had every powertrain option from V8, V6, 4 cyl, and diesel V8.
They covered front wheel drive and rear wheel drive.

The 85-92 Fleetwood is totally diferent from the Fleetwood many think of during the 1977-2006 era.
In 88 the Fleetwod that most think of was called a Brougham.

So the 88 is a 4 speed front wheel drive 155 hp 4.5L on a car that weighs 3500-4000 lbs.

Not many have said great things about the engines.
Always seemed to be oil leakers.
They did have problems with cylinder wall knocking.
The metal cylinder wall liner would come loose & knock in the alum block.
At least that's the story.
I replaced a number of the 4.5l's back in the day, but never rebuilt.
The thought probibly was the block may be not worth repairing if it had a liner or overheating problem.
Easier to price out a new long block, & faster to do.
For miles I think every one I did had between 50k to 120k mikes.
But the care were much newer.

I don't remember doing trans replacements on these in particular but in general the 440 transmissions could get 200k miles give or take before fail.
But some let go a lot before that. Most other 440 trans cars were a bit lighter.

Besides maintenance, steering, suspension, & brakes they suffered from the typical GM problems of the time.
ECM computers would get intermitant or fail because of a poor circuit board design.
Engine sensors wern't as good. Fuel pumps maybe 60k mikes.

There is not many of these cars out there. In my area none on Craigslist. Ebay has 4 starting at $900 up to $13000.
Think most have already met the scrapyard.

There is probily a different spot on this forum about these cars in particular.

To sum it up I wouldn't go for a long road trip to pick up one of those cars as a daily driver unless there was no other option.
 

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1987 Cadillac Brougham d'Elegance
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Don't know if that's comparable, but I'm daily driving a 87 Brougham up here in Ontario for more than 2 years now. Most reliable car I ever had.
 

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70 Deville 78 Seville 92 Deville 03 Deville
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I gave up trying to keep the late 80's Fleetwoods and Broughams straight. I guess Cadillac wanted to convert people to FWD by confusing the crap out of them.
 

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1964 Fleetwood
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It’s a 1988 Fleetwood Brougham, she told me. The big boxy RWD one. Sorry, should’ve been more clear!
 

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'84 Eldorado and Seville
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Ziebart can probably do the rustproofing. Older cars that might have some rust they should pre-treat it. I'm not sure what they use but that is what my local dealer told me about a '91 I plan on having done. It cost more to have them do this service but worth it in my opinion.

What you might want to do also is paint some clear POR-15 along the bottom of the doors along the fold seam. If Ziebart does their rustproofing the inside of the door should get sprayed with rustproofing. Also paint some clear POR-15 along the rear seam on the inside of the trunk lid. That area is prone to rust due to the design. Standing moisture in that area between the bumper filler and trunk lid edge seems to penetrate the seam from the outside and not from the inside. I have an '84 that I recently got that was rustproofed and I can see the material sprayed inside the trunk lid and the car has 2 small spots of rust that is scheduled to be repaired next week. A '91 that I also have working on it it also has rust in that area.
Other areas you might consider hitting with POR-15 is behind the chrome.

I would say the '88 probably weighs more than the '96 but I haven't checked the specs. A heavier car would get more snow traction.

You will probably be looking at doing a headliner replacement also on the '88. That is pretty much a given.

Get a shop or you to replace the knock sensor on the side of the engine that is prone to moisture and rust. Look on the drivers side engine block to see if the engine has one. You don't mention what engine the '88 has. Paint the replacement knock sensor and use a silicone sealant to prevent rust on the threads.

Thoroughly look over the brake lines too. Brake lines on older cars not rustproofed do rust. A company named Inline Tube sells replacement sets. I was told there is another company from Nova Scotia that sells replacements but I don't know the name of the company.
 

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The 88 rear wheel drive Broughams are solid cars.
Ony negitive would be the Old's 307.
While Olds had some great engines, I never thought much of the 307.
Not that they would blow up. Just not much for power. This year was 140 hp.
The computer controlled Quadrajet never worked that great and very few tech could rebuild one well.
The engine was old tech, with a 1/4 ton of vacuum hoses to control emmisions and idle.

If you put a older 350 carb & distributer they ran better. Except for the check engine light on.
Good thing about them was you could swap them out for an Olds 350 as the blocks were identical.
The Olds 455 would also fit except brackets would need to come from the big block.
Exhaust manifolds varied by year / model different the exhaust downpipe & crossover might need to be different.
Real problem is you need to go back to the 60's or 70's to get a good Olds engine.
So they're not in every bone yard & CL ad.

Sorry I have to disagree with POR.
I beliver their products are as big of a sham as Rustolium spray cans.

But we're both getting ahead talking about changing engines & rust prevention.
You want a daily driver. As long as the basic maintenance is good - Steering, suspension, brakes, starting, charging, tune-up carb, & fluids... Then your good to go.
 

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Hello all! This is my first post, just found out about this forum. I currently own a 1964 Fleetwood as my summer cruiser. My 1996 Fleetwood has been my daily driver since 2013, it only has about 125,000 miles on it and by ziebarting yearly very minimal rust. Unfortunately, I was t-boned by a suburban running a red light. Car is absolutely mangled. My aunt recently gave up driving and offered me her 1988 Fleetwood. She lives in Texas, so it is completely rust free. If I throw on some snow tires and spray the undercarriage, would I be able to expect a similar driving experience as I had in my 1996 during winter? She’s done all the maintenance as her husband was meticulous about maintaining their vehicles. Just at 94 years old, she prefers to let others do the driving now! Thanks for your time!
?We're in upstate NY and our '88 Fleetwood Brougham is our daily driver; but we don't go on long trips with it. It's definitely underpowered, as we were used to 1970's 472s. It has 150,000 miles on it and had to replace intake manifold gasket a while back. I think that was the only major job we ever did on it. It happens to be good in snow, and we get plenty up here. Replaced front shocks & tires and it handles reasonably well for an old car. The rear shocks are the type that level with a small compressor under the hood and hasn't work right for years, but we get by. The car does like to eat front brakes though; probably 'cause the are rather small pads/calipers for a heavy car..Just don;t expect to outrun anyone from a stop light as you can probably run faster than that little 5 liter can
 

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GM in their wisdom to make the cars cheaper, lighter, & better fuel economy started using smaller brakes in the later 1970's.
What once had 12" rear drums now had 9.5" on most built, same as the midsize cars.
By the 90's it was up to 11" drums.
 

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Ahh, so that's it.. stopping the 88 Brougham at highway speed always takes a little longer distance than, say, our mustang GT; or even the older 70's Cads we have
 

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'72 Eldorado Convertible, '97 Eldorado ETC, '93 Fleetwood
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I spent a weekend in an '88.

The other lawyer in my office offered me his for our weekend trip.

I was downright stunned by the lack of power--and most of the trip from Las Vegas to San Diego is either uphill or downhill . . .

I was used to my '89 Crown Victoria LX, and while the interior trim was a bit more luxurious, it struggled with mountains that I generally just shot up.

On the little bits of flatlands, no problem at all . . .

At least the lack of power meant my wife wasn't going all that much faster when she passed the CHP :rolleyes:. But when he asked why she didn't slow own when she passed the black and white, she replied "it's an automatic transmission so the brake lights would have shown.":eek:

hawk
 
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