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1998 Cadillac DeVille
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15 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just bought my car, and it only has 44,500 miles on it. and I am wondering if I should start using the clean straight gasoline in the engine rather than the stuff with the ethonal. isn't that supposed to be a better grade of gasoline? My husband uses it all the time in his GMC 1997 truck and swears by it. Would this keep my internal parts in my engine cleaner longer? Just wondering here. How many of you actually use CLEAN GASOLINE?
Thanks.
 

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2002.5 F55 CORSA STS, 2014 Explorer XLT FWD
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E10 gasoline IS "clean gasoline". Nothing wrong with the stuff. Usually found in and near areas with state or federal emissions requirements.

Google "top tier gasoline" for the stations that sell the top of the line clean gasolines.

FWIW, ethanol ( the E in E10) is a powerful fuel system cleaner.
 

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2007 CTS 2.7L
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510 Posts
I do not think any gas is made without ethanol in it. All gas now days has 10-15% Ethanol. E10 means that the gas has 10% Ethanol in it. You can NOT run E85. It will damage the engine and fuel system.
 

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2002.5 F55 CORSA STS, 2014 Explorer XLT FWD
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There are MANY non-E10 gasolines and stations today that, even in emissions areas, sell "straight" gas. Even here, in strait-laced old Maryland, I can get "straight" gasoline from Shell, Sunoco, BP, others.

Look through this for a start.

 

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2005 CTS 3.6 - 165k miles
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FWIW, ethanol ( the E in E10) is a powerful fuel system cleaner.
I disagree. everything i've ever ran ethanol in has ended up with some type of problems related to ethanol. i pulled a slug of who knows what substance out of the lawn mower carburetor. looked like chapstick or parafin wax but was a jelly like substance. additionally i recently had to clean the fourwheeler carburetor and it was caked up with the same shit. I'm very wary of ethanol gasolines
 

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2002.5 F55 CORSA STS, 2014 Explorer XLT FWD
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And I disagree - with E10 in everything from cars, trucks, boats, lawnmowers, chain saws, and yard equipment, using fresh fuel and stabilizers, I have NEVER - since E10 began many years ago - had a gasoline problem.

66 gallons of E10 87 octane sits in my boat from about November to April - never a problem. Olds 455 with one of my Quadrajet carbs. See the picture.

The STS is now a garage queen. I just drove it 35 miles this morning - after 5 weeks in the garage - not a problem. Not even a hint of a hiccup. 18 gallons of E10 87 octane in it.

Boat12.jpg
 

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2002.5 F55 CORSA STS, 2014 Explorer XLT FWD
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Footnote - if you intend to store something that lives on gasoline, use a stabilizer and fill the tank(s). A full tank allows less airspace to expand/contract with temperature changes - that means less humidity that might condense on the tank walls and form snot.
 

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2007 CTS 2.7L
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Ok, so in MY area in Phoenix and regional travels, I have not seen non-ethanol gas. That does not mean there is not as I just found a list online. This is for pollution purposes (read below) This is state by state, not set by the federal government. Some states do not even require it, but it depends on the fuel manufacturer, too. As an example, Missouri exempts all of the standard constituents that need it and it even has a blanket exemption for premium unleaded. But they don't require ethanol to be labeled at the pump, so you don't really know if it's in the fuel you're getting or not anyway.

Next time you get gas, look at the sticker on the pump. It probably says "May Contain". SO it is a surprise in every gallon! Never know what you get or when. :)

In theory. "ethanol is used to oxygenate the gasoline mixture, which in turn allows the fuel to burn more completely and therefore produce cleaner emissions, its use in fuel has obvious benefits for air quality." Which is why the government has a mandate for it."

EPA:
"There are three general categories of ethanol-gasoline blends: E10, E15, and E85. E10 is gasoline with 10% ethanol content. E15 is gasoline with 15% ethanol content, and E85 is a fuel that may contain up to 85% fuel ethanol. The ethanol content of most of the motor gasoline sold in the United States does not exceed 10% by volume. Most motor gasoline with more than 10% fuel ethanol content is sold in the Midwest where most ethanol production capacity is located. Gasoline dispensing pumps generally indicate the fuel ethanol content of the gasoline."
 

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1998 Cadillac DeVille
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E10 gasoline IS "clean gasoline". Nothing wrong with the stuff. Usually found in and near areas with state or federal emissions requirements.

Google "top tier gasoline" for the stations that sell the top of the line clean gasolines.

FWIW, ethanol ( the E in E10) is a powerful fuel system cleaner.
I will google the gasolines, Here in Virginia, we do have what is referred to as 'CLEAN' GAS, with no ethanol in it. It is about $.30 more a gallon, so it is not cheap. I have read every posting for my question, and thank you all so very much for helping me here. I will check into the E-10 gas situation since it is supposed to be super clean. Thank you all again.

I do not think any gas is made without ethanol in it. All gas now days has 10-15% Ethanol. E10 means that the gas has 10% Ethanol in it. You can NOT run E85. It will damage the engine and fuel system.
Here in Northern Virginia, the state sells what is referred to as "CLEAN" gas, no ethanol in it at all. It costs approximately $.30 more a gallon, so besides being expensive, it would mean I would have to drive out of my way to get to these particular gas stations. I am using regular normal gas at Shell, basically. and my car is running great. SO from what I have read from all of your postings. I will stick to the regular gasoline. Thank you all so much for your inputs.

Ok, so in MY area in Phoenix and regional travels, I have not seen non-ethanol gas. That does not mean there is not as I just found a list online. This is for pollution purposes (read below) This is state by state, not set by the federal government. Some states do not even require it, but it depends on the fuel manufacturer, too. As an example, Missouri exempts all of the standard constituents that need it and it even has a blanket exemption for premium unleaded. But they don't require ethanol to be labeled at the pump, so you don't really know if it's in the fuel you're getting or not anyway.

Next time you get gas, look at the sticker on the pump. It probably says "May Contain". SO it is a surprise in every gallon! Never know what you get or when. :)

In theory. "ethanol is used to oxygenate the gasoline mixture, which in turn allows the fuel to burn more completely and therefore produce cleaner emissions, its use in fuel has obvious benefits for air quality." Which is why the government has a mandate for it."

EPA:
"There are three general categories of ethanol-gasoline blends: E10, E15, and E85. E10 is gasoline with 10% ethanol content. E15 is gasoline with 15% ethanol content, and E85 is a fuel that may contain up to 85% fuel ethanol. The ethanol content of most of the motor gasoline sold in the United States does not exceed 10% by volume. Most motor gasoline with more than 10% fuel ethanol content is sold in the Midwest where most ethanol production capacity is located. Gasoline dispensing pumps generally indicate the fuel ethanol content of the gasoline."
Thank you for your information it has helped me immensely.

Ok, so in MY area in Phoenix and regional travels, I have not seen non-ethanol gas. That does not mean there is not as I just found a list online. This is for pollution purposes (read below) This is state by state, not set by the federal government. Some states do not even require it, but it depends on the fuel manufacturer, too. As an example, Missouri exempts all of the standard constituents that need it and it even has a blanket exemption for premium unleaded. But they don't require ethanol to be labeled at the pump, so you don't really know if it's in the fuel you're getting or not anyway.

Next time you get gas, look at the sticker on the pump. It probably says "May Contain". SO it is a surprise in every gallon! Never know what you get or when. :)

In theory. "ethanol is used to oxygenate the gasoline mixture, which in turn allows the fuel to burn more completely and therefore produce cleaner emissions, its use in fuel has obvious benefits for air quality." Which is why the government has a mandate for it."

EPA:
"There are three general categories of ethanol-gasoline blends: E10, E15, and E85. E10 is gasoline with 10% ethanol content. E15 is gasoline with 15% ethanol content, and E85 is a fuel that may contain up to 85% fuel ethanol. The ethanol content of most of the motor gasoline sold in the United States does not exceed 10% by volume. Most motor gasoline with more than 10% fuel ethanol content is sold in the Midwest where most ethanol production capacity is located. Gasoline dispensing pumps generally indicate the fuel ethanol content of the gasoline."
Now that I am learning abourt gasoline, I'm going to be able to take care of my Beauty CTS for a long time.

There are MANY non-E10 gasolines and stations today that, even in emissions areas, sell "straight" gas. Even here, in strait-laced old Maryland, I can get "straight" gasoline from Shell, Sunoco, BP, others.

Look through this for a start.

Thnk you for the Link.
 
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