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Discussion Starter #1
I think the passenger side rotor is woarped, after hard braking the car shakes ALOT and when i got home, smoke was comming from the wheel and it was to hot to touch. I have that chiltons manual thing and stuff. Is it hard to do? Iam trying to sell it and i dont have the money to really take it to a shop, that and iam sick of spending 200 here and there on it.
 

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1995 Fleetwood Brougham
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709 Posts
It sounds like you might have a caliper thats sticking from what you are saying. its sounds like your gonna have to change at least the bad caliper the 2 rotors if they can't be cut and a set of pads. If the rotors aren't below spec it will cost about $10.00 a rotor to cut. IF they can't be cut those rotors are pretty cheap about 20.00-25.00. caliper and pads shouldn't be that much either. On the positve side if you do everything. the car will definately stop on a dime and that would be a good selling point... :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
so how hard will it be to replace all that in my driveway?
 

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´67 Eldorado, ´96 Eldorado
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Its easy job - with normal tools and few beers it takes about hour per wheel ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
vanaisa said:
Its easy job - with normal tools and few beers it takes about hour per wheel ;)
ROOT beer right ;) iam only 18.
 

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1994 STS - pearl white
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Try this before you start replacing parts:

Let the brakes get stone cold - try this first thing in the morning or after letting it sit for a few hours. Quickly accelerate to about 50 mph & then brake to a stop moderately hard. The rotor may not be permanently warped. It may only pulse once it's hot. Don't cruise to a deserted street before trying this - you'll heat up the rotor. The goal is to get up to speed quick & stop quick & keep the rotor cool. If you can't safely try this on your own street, park in the back 40 of a shopping mall & hit the stores for a while.

If the pulsing is there when you try this test, the rotor is likely permanently warped and will need to be turned / cut or replaced. If the pulsing is not there, you just need to fix the caliper(s).

I have freed up a stuck caliper (on the side of the road, I might add) with a big C-clamp before. Push the piston all the way back in, pump the brakes to drive the piston back out & repeat the process until you feel it's moving freely. You may need to suck some of the fluid out of the master cylinder first so it doesn't overflow. If you can free it up, flush the brake fluid, because there was likely a piece of crud jamming the piston in the bore. Flushing the fluid will most likely get rid of the guilty piece of crud, and a couple of bottle of brake fluid might save you the cost of a caliper. You will need to free up the bleeder screws at all 4 wheels, but you'll need to do this to bleed the brakes if you replace a caliper, anyway. Take care not to snap them off if they are rusty.

I had the same problem a number of years ago while I was a student - pulsing, smoking brakes, vibrations & all. I followed the above procedure & I never replaced either caliper. If I remember the dates right, I drove that car for another 10 years after that.

It's always a good idea to flush out brake fluid every 2 years or so. It picks up moisture (past seals, etc.), which lowers the boiling point of the fluid & corrodes the system from the inside out. This is why brake fluid turns black over time.

A couple of additional tips for flushing brake fluid:

1) Suck out as much of the old fluid as possible out of the reservoir with a turkey baster before you start. If you can, wipe clean the inside of the reservoir with a lint-free rag or coffee filter (don't laugh - people use coffee filters for cleaning windows because they are lint-free). Old style reservoirs where the whole lid came off are easy to do. You can't really do this to the new style screw-cap reservoirs.

2) When bleeding calipers, push the piston ALMOST all the way in with a big C-clamp (leave the clamp in place) before flushing / bleeding. The process goes a lot faster if there isn't very much fluid in the caliper.

3) Keep pumping new fluid throught he system until the stuff coming out is clean & free of bubbles.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
thanks, if it ever stops raining i'll give it a shot.
 
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