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Discussion Starter #42
Well folks, its time for another update. This week (November 29, 2005) we have switched to another Cadillac model, and we've done a larger update; rather than do one year, we're going to do a whole generation. This week's history lesson:D is about something you all probably know about...

The legendary Fourth-Generation Seville: (1992-1997)

The fourth Seville was the greatest leap forward for the car since its introduction. It was still front-wheel driven, but it was longer, wider and more cleanly styled with a muscular crispness wholly missing from the car it replaced. "Ever since I saw a prototype of the 1992 Cadillac Seville at the Los Angeles Auto Show last January," wrote BusinessWeek's Larry Armstrong, "I've been itching to drive that car. Even then from its svelte good looks and toned-down interior, it seemed that an American company had finally come up with the right formula to compete with the Japanese. That's especially important for Cadillac, as Lexus and Infiniti have used sophisticated styling and down-to-earth practicality to steal away sales."

There was nothing really startling in the new Seville's engineering (or that of its two-door fraternal twin, the Eldorado). The unibody structure was significantly stiffer than before, but the front suspension was still a pair of MacPherson struts and the independent rear suspension was unique only in using a single Corvette-like transverse leaf spring. The wheelbase was back up to 111.0 inches and the overall length now stretched a full 203.9 inches. That's only a three-inch increase in wheelbase from the previous-generation Seville, but a full 15.7 inches of additional total length. That's also a mere 1/10th of an inch shorter than the original '76 Seville.

For '92, the Seville was offered in either regular Seville form or as the Seville Touring Sedan (STS). Both models had the same 200-hp, 4.9-liter, V8 that was used in the '91 Seville hooked up to GM's smooth and responsive 4T60-E electronically controlled four-speed automatic transmission.

With its handsome exterior, comfortable and clean interior and competent drivetrain, the '92 Seville was an instant hit both with the critics and buyers. Yet, things would get even better.

After its introduction in the early 1993 Allante roadster, the fabulous 4.6-liter, DOHC, 32-valve, Northstar V8 made it over to the Seville and Eldorado for 1993. The STS got the Northstar, while other Sevilles were left with the old pushrod 4.9. With 295 hp onboard, the Northstar made the Seville STS a legitimate performance car. "Thanks to such items as equal-length driveshafts, a new electronically controlled 4T80-E transmission, fluidic engine mounts and Bosch ASRIIU traction control," wrote Motor Trend, "you can flatfoot the megapower Seville off the line with an arrow-straight trajectory."

The '93 STS was simply the quickest, best-handling Seville yet. And more good stuff was coming.

For 1994, the Seville lineup was rationalized into Seville Luxury Sedan (SLS) and Seville Touring Sedan (STS), and both were powered by the Northstar V8. The softer-sprung, easier-going SLS got a Northstar making 270 hp, while the STS version still pumped out the full 295. Sales were still strong, despite the fact that the SLS' price started at $40,990 and the STS couldn't be had for less than $44,890.

A few new tricks in the engine bay, including a new induction system, boosted the output of the 1995 Northstar V8s hp to 275 in the SLS and an even 300 in the STS. Otherwise, changes were limited to trim selections and sales continued to be relatively strong.

The changes were even less noticeable for 1996 — at least from the outside. The interior was more heavily retrimmed and the dash revised with a wider gauge cluster.

A few suspension tweaks and one-inch-larger diameter front disc brakes were among the many changes to the Seville for 1997. And some of those changes paid off according to Car and Driver. "For starters," the editors reported, "the unibody structure has been significantly reinforced and now boasts four rigid beams spanning the floorpan. The center tunnel has been boxed for greater rigidity. The steering column supports are reinforced to limit the vibes felt at the wheel rim. And a new front control-arm design helps soften road impacts." The car was also relatively quick with the magazine measuring a 0-to-60-mph blast of 6.9 seconds and the quarter-mile going by in 15.3 seconds at 93 mph.

But there was a new Seville coming…and the '97 seemed relatively outdated with fresh competition from BMW, Lexus and Mercedes out there. Could the next Seville bring the luster back?


Man they were beautiful:
 

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Discussion Starter #43
This week brings yet another update. Hopefully you guys will find this one a bit more interesting???:rolleyes: It is a classic model; this week (December 6, 2005) the history topic will be....(*drumroll*)....

The Eldorado Brougham!

Derived from a Cadillac concept vehicle exhibited during the GM Motorama of 1955, the luxurious, limited edition Eldorado Brougham models of 1957 through 1960 epitomized luxury car styling and technical/mechanical innovation of the late fifties. Cadillac continued to carve out its high reputation as the makers of the "The Standard of the World".


The Cadillac Eldorado Brougham was the company's post-WW2 styling coup de force. While no single Cadillac stylist may be credited with the final design, the latter began on the drawing boards of Bob Scheelk, a new recruit to the GM Styling Section, the new name for the former Art and Color. Bob's work was supervised by Charles "Chuck" Jordan (who had taken over from Ed Glowacke), and by Chuck's assistant, Dave Holls.


On September 15, 1955, the Cadillac Styling Section moved from its old quarters in downtown Detroit to the new, ultra-modern General MotorsTechnical Center at Warren, north of the Motor City. From that day forward, Cadillacs adopted a new, lighter, brighter look, like that of the new buildings where they were being designed.
The Eldorado Brougham was the product of several years of engineering and styling development. It was preceded by a number of experimental models, concept vehicles and so-called dream cars including, principally, the Cadillac "Orleans" (1953), the "Park Avenue" (1954), the "Eldorado Brougham" prototype (1955), the second Eldorado Brougham prototype and Paris show car (1955-56) and the "Eldorado Brougham town car" (1956).


The first production Eldorado Brougham (car #3) was shown at the New York Salon in January 1957. This car was featured also in a factory promotional film set in New York's Central Park, where it stole the limelight from another, specially-appointed Cadillac Series Sixty Special, the "Director", that was all decked out as a mobile office.


The Cadillac Eldorado Brougham, often described as "the ultimate in personal transportation", is and always will remain a rare, superior and beautifully elegant automobile. It typifies in a way the excesses of post-WW2 American automobile flamboyance. In his authoritative "History of Cadillac", author Maurice Hendry of New Zealand said. "the biggest news for fans of mid-fifties gimcrackery and engineering innovation was the Eldorado Brougham..."


It's astronomical price tag (for the time) of more than $13,000, did not deter the 904 wealthy Cadillac patrons who bought one. The "Eldorado Brougham" certainly was a high quality automobile, considering that in the early part of the new millennium 2001, more than half the total number built had survived and were in the hands of enthusiasts and collectors the world over, the majority being in good to very good condition despite 40-45 years of use.

 

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Wow the Eldorado Brougham! The most expensive Cadillac ever! (~$14,000 new, in 1957!!!!) The former police chief of Minneapolis has one, and my Vehicle Services Teacher back in high school did the carburator work on it!!!
 

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The 57-58 Eldorado Brougham is similar in concept to the 1974-76 Fleetwood Brougham Talismans.
 

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I love these Eldos for their audacity. Saw one in Orange County, CA on eBay a few weeks ago with a starting bid of $100K. Don't think it sold, though.
 

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Discussion Starter #48
Today is Tuesday (December 13, 2005) and we are doing a feature on a group of Cadillac engines today. I know, I know, probably not as interesting as a car model, BUT we have to cover everything in this history class:rolleyes:

This weeks topic is none other than....

THE OHV V8s of the 80s! Yay!

HT-4100
Another new V8 appeared in 1982 as the HT-4100 (option code LT8). This engine was originally designed for transverse front wheel drive use in the planned downsized 1983 Cadillac sedans. However, delays in General Motors' BOC (Buick-Oldsmobile-Cadillac) large sedan program and the colossal failure of the L62 V8-6-4 caused the HT-4100 to be rushed into production for the 1982 model year.
The 4.1 L HT-4100 featured an unusual aluminum block with iron head construction. Bore was 88 mm and stroke was 84 mm; in most applications, it was equipped with throttle-body "digital" fuel injection. Initial output was a paltry 125 hp (93 kW), not nearly enough to provide Cadillac-level acceleration in the heavy Cadillacs of the early 80s (which were designed for a much bigger V8); early models were plagued with reliability problems. Later versions of the HT-4100 were used in the originally-planned front wheel drive configuration throughout the Cadillac line (with the exception of the limousines and the Cimarron).
The version found in the 1987 Cadillac Allante featured port fuel injection, with output of 170 hp (126.8 kW) and 235 ft.lbf (319 Nm) of torque. The 4.1 was superseded by larger models and ceased production in 1988.

HT-4500
Engineering allowed the company to begin to raise displacement and output again. A bored-out (to 92 mm) 4.5 L HT-4500 version was introduced in 1988 with 155 hp (116 kW). Various versions were built between this introduction and the end of production for this engine in 1992, including a high-output LW2 with multiport fuel injection version for the Allante which produced 200 hp (149 kW) and 270 ft.lbf (366 Nm).

HT-4900
An even larger version, the L26 HT-4900, debuted in 1991 at 4.9 L with a square 92 mm bore and stroke. Power was the same as the 4500 at 200 hp (149 kW) but torque was up slightly to 275 ft.lbf (373 Nm). The engine was produced until 1996.
This Cadillac V8 series was used in the following models:
  • Cadillac Allante
  • Cadillac Deville
  • Cadillac Eldorado
  • Cadillac Fleetwood
  • Cadillac Seville
This engine was phased out in favor of the newer Cadillac Northstar engine in the mid-1990s.

Rear-wheel-drive Cadillacs
From 1982 to 1985, all RWD Cadillacs (except for the limousines) featured the HT-4100 V8, though this could be replaced with a 4.1 L Buick LD5 V6 or a 5.7 L Oldsmobile LF9 Diesel V8. From 1986 to 1989, the rear wheel drive Cadillacs - the Fleetwood Brougham and Brougham - used a 5.0 L (307 in³) Oldsmobile 307 carbureted V8 (replacing the HT4100). In 1990, a 175 horsepower, fuel-injected 5.7 L (350 in³) Chevrolet Small-Block V8 became available to coachbuilders. In 1991, the Oldsmobile 307 was replaced with a 5.0 L (305 in³) fuel-injected Small-Block V8; the 350 in³ Small-BlockLT1 V8 with 260 hp (194 kW), which the Fleetwood would use until it was discontinued in 1996. became available in non-coachbuilder vehicles as well. In 1993, the 180 hp (134 kW) 350 in³ V8 became standard in the newly-renamed Cadillac Fleetwood; in 1994, this was upgraded to a detuned Corvette.


HT 4100:

 

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Interesting entry, especially considering I have a 4.9 in my '91 DeVille. I've been very impressed with it's smooth, silent operation while still managing to haul ass—and at 200K miles no less. Responsiveness is much better with the new Bosch fuel injectors from FiveOMotorsport.

Besides the larger displacement and port fuel injection, how else is the 4.9 improved from the original HT4100? Does it still have iron heads? Any ideas why Cadillac put iron heads on an aluminum block? That makes no sense.
 

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Yeah this is very good stuff!:thumbsup:
I didnt know that the FWD Caddies were delayed until '85, and that the 4.1 was never meant to go into the RWD ones! Awesome! :D
It seems more logical after you learn this stuff, basically they HAD to put the 4.1 into the RWD Caddies, and it wasnt intended to go in there.

gdwriter, the 4.9 does still have iron heads.
 

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Discussion Starter #52
Wow, I got lots of feedback...I guess I should do engines more often...Any requests, by the way? Just PM me and I will see what I can do...:thumbsup:
 

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ben72227 said:
Rear-wheel-drive Cadillacs
From 1982 to 1985, all RWD Cadillacs (except for the limousines) featured the HT-4100 V8, though this could be replaced with a 4.1 L Buick LD5 V6 or a 5.7 L Oldsmobile LF9 Diesel V8. From 1986 to 1989, the rear wheel drive Cadillacs - the Fleetwood Brougham and Brougham - used a 5.0 L (307 in³) Oldsmobile 307 carbureted V8 (replacing the HT4100). In 1990, a 175 horsepower, fuel-injected 5.7 L (350 in³) Chevrolet Small-Block V8 became available to coachbuilders. In 1991, the Oldsmobile 307 was replaced with a 5.0 L (305 in³) fuel-injected Small-Block V8; the 350 in³ Small-BlockLT1 V8 with 260 hp (194 kW), which the Fleetwood would use until it was discontinued in 1996. became available in non-coachbuilder vehicles as well. In 1993, the 180 hp (134 kW) 350 in³ V8 became standard in the newly-renamed Cadillac Fleetwood; in 1994, this was upgraded to a detuned Corvette.

An eagle-eyed member noticed a couple inaccuracies in this paragraph, and asked me to chime in with some clarification.

The 140hp Olds 307(VIN code 'Y', Option code LV2) was used in all RWD applications through the 1990 model year. It was replaced by the 170hp Chevy 305(VIN code 'E', Option code L03) for the '91 & '92 model years as the base engine. There was an optional engine offered starting in 1990, it was the 185hp Chevy 350(VIN code '7', Option code L05). This engine was only used for four years, '90-'93, at which time the 260hp Chevy 350(VIN code 'P', Option code LT1) took over for the final three years of production ('94-'96).

The above data was taken from Cadillac factory literature.
 

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Discussion Starter #54
Well Thanks for correcting me Katshot. I don't always remember EVERYTHING, so its nice to have other members fill in missing details...
 

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Are you kidding? REMEMBER EVERYTHING?! I've been afflicted with CRS for years. LOL!!! That's why they make books! All the info you have here is WAY more than anybody I know could dredge up from memory. I just happen to know a little bit of the basics and then rely on my literature to fill in the blanks!
You have a great thread here with some great info and pictures (I especially like that old Eldo).
 

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Discussion Starter #56
Well, I don't remember ALL of it, and I do look somethings up occasionally...:thumbsup:, but most of it comes from memory - i just look up exact things, like engine sizes, production numbers, etc.
 

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I must admit, my memory was much better when I was 17 too. But that brings up another question. How much can you have about Cadillac history "in memory" at 17 years old? :hmm:
 

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I understand that Cadillac wanted to keep Cadillac engines in Cadillac cars, but surely they realized then what a huge mistake putting the 4100 into vehicles like Fleetwoods and DeVilles was. Then, when things are looking good in the late 80's, why the decision to go with Chevy engines, both base and upgrade? I believe the best option for Cadillac to pursue would have been to remove the 8-6-4 from the 368 and keep it fuel-injected.
 

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Discussion Starter #59
I must admit, my memory was much better when I was 17 too. But that brings up another question. How much can you have about Cadillac history "in memory" at 17 years old? :hmm:
Well, its simple really. I read A LOT. I'm very...different from most kids my age. While they spend their free time watching the O.C.:p, I spend time reading about stuff. I'm a history buff too;), and I read a lot about Cadillacs and the history of the automotive industry in general. I don't know everything, and I do have to look up details...but I know most of the important stuff...
 

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Great threads, I'm new to forum but I've been around Cadillacs at many times during my life. As for the engines the 500 cu in that resided in my moms 76 Eldo was unmatched in torque. Then the next year she got a black Eldo Biaritz with the 425 cu in Oldsmobile engine. It was a good engine but no where near as good. I had a '73 Fleetwood 60 Special Brouham with the 372 cu in which with carefull driving, tuning and tires delivered 15 mpg during the '77 gas shortages.

I worked in production maintenance with GM's Rochester Products Division when the Alante was introduced and I serviced the area where the fuel injection system was hand built by 1 employee for only 8 hrs a day.

My '73 Fleetwood
 
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