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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, Im new to forum and plan to be the owner of a classic Cadillac after this weekend. I am hoping for a little advice from you knowledgeable folks. I am looking at two two different cars tomorrow and having a hard time determining which car would be a better value for the money AND which would have parts more readily available. So here are my options:
1965 Sedan Deville- 60K miles in pretty good shape, needs new water pump $8,000 obo
or
1970 Fleetwood Brougham with 60K miles not in as good of shape but only $4,000

I'm not looking to build to show car, but want something that I can cruize around in with the family and be able to find parts for when things break.

Thank you.
Travis
 

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2014 ELR
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We're going to need WAY more info on each car. "not as good shape" and "pretty good shape" are very broad. Paint, rust, mechanical, interior, mileage, etc etc.

Different engine family, too.

Both are GIANT cars that actually may not fit in a modern garage. Measure carefully. I had to take garage stairs out to fit one of my cars (65 Impala) in my last house, and two that were bigger (71 Pontiac, and 81 Fleetwood) would not fit. Both of the cars you are looking at are longer than the 71 and the 81.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Understand about needing more info. Problem is that I dont have a ton myself at the moment. Both are owned by non-car people who are older and they genuinely dont know much about either car.
What I've gathered from the owners and the pics is that both cars have 60k miles on them. The trim on both are complete and the body on both are pretty straight. Both cars are supposed to run good.
Here's the differences I know of: the 65 has a better paint job and the interior looks great with exception to the seats which have a rips in them.
The 70 has faded (dull) paint with a dent in hood the size of a golf ball. The 70's interior needs the seats redone too.

I'm leaning towards to 70 due to the price and bigger engine.

My biggest concern is parts availability and not buying a year that has known problems.

Thanks again.
 

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95 FWB 81SDV 96 FWB 94 Fleetwood
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Most cars with 60K miles don't have a worn out interior. 1965 and 1970 speedometer's go back to "0" after 100K . So I look at the brake petal for ware, that will tell you more about true miles. From the sound of those cars I would pass on both of them.
 

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'84 Eldorado and Seville
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One thing to look at are the brake lines. I don't think in line tube makes replacements if they need replacement. Someone would have hand make those. Both cars are probably lacquer paint. Chances are both have paint checking. The only fix is a repaint. Some people strip to bare metal and I have read some use an epoxy sealer before a repaint. In my opinion the parts availability for the 70 would be greater plus finding a parts catalog on eBay. Having a parts catalog is handy to have. I would look in the trunk and pull back any lining and look for water leaks from the rear window. Most of the GM cars of that era the rear window chrome trim caps over a valley where water stands. Be prepared to crawl under the car to check for rust and corrosion damage. If it isn't too bad a place like Ziebart can do an undercoating. If you decide doing that get some photo's to send/share with a local franchise to look at for their opinion. Their is another nationwide company that does that also but I can't think of their name right now. You may also be looking at a fuel tank flush too. A company like tank renu can coat the inside to prevent leaks or stop leaks also to I believe, If you can't do repair work be prepared to find someone who can. Something to keep in mind. Better to find out first before you need someone. . You might want to search Car-Part.com--Used Auto Parts Market to see if anyone has salvage cars for parts.
 

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You'll spend much much more than 4k on paint and interior. Have you priced good paint work lately? We did a 63 Chevy last year, it was 14k for the body and paint work. No rust repair.

It doesn't matter if the owners aren't car people. YOU need to be the expert. Car comes out of garage, you check it carefully. Then, it goes to a shop to go on a lift. A list gets made of leaks, worn parts, corrosion issues, electric problems, cosmetic needs. Then, you think about how much the car is worth (and is worth to you), and how much you are willing to spend to get it in a condition that you will be ok with.

Neither of those cars are very collectible/desireable, so putting a lot of money in either one is not going to be a good investment.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Great points
Ill make sure to look at the drain channels for rust and I'll be sure to look at pedal and see if they have past registrations/title to see if the numbers make sense.

Thank you all for the advice.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
OK. Here is where Im sitting after looking at the two cars. The 70 Fleetwood Brougham was complete garbage, really nothing more than an overpriced parts car. The 65 sedan deville is definitely a daily driver. The body is straight minus one small dent on the driver side quarter panel, interior and exterior trim and chrome are complete and in good shape. Paint is original with chips, but not bad overall. Wheels were replaced with Craiger style wheels, which I'm not stoked about, but don't look horrible. Edlebrock carb and new exhaust, car runs great.
Heres the bad parts: The odometer has obviously flipped, most likely 160K on the car. Seats are ripped (but the rest of interior is great), fuel pump and water pump need to be replaced, tires are dry rotted, door switches for the electric window and lock motors are worn out and barely work, climate control is not working (heat, cooling, and fan wont come on). The seller will come down to $7k.

In your opinion, is this something to pass on? Overall, I'm happy with the way the car runs, but it obviously needs electrical work. Comparable cars being sold in the area look worse and are higher priced. I am not looking to build to a show car, just something fun for the family to cruise around in.

Thanks for all of the input. This seems like a great site for information.
 

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Go ahead, blame me. Everybody does 🙄
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Walk.
Unless the car has some sort of nostalgic or sentimental value, it will NEVER be worth what you'll put into it monetarily. There are plenty other examples out there in that price range which would be more suitable candidates...and that's without seeing pics of it.
 

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1969 Deville convertible
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I agree with Long, these cars usually sell for much less. And with good interior. The high dollar parts are mostly what you listed, the climate control alone is 400 dollars for that one trust me any less and you are buying a junk piece with no warrantee. Getting the seats redone is pricey unless you buy the seat covers and put them on yourself, but that looks cheesy. I tried that with mine and ended up taking it to a pro and spending 3K on the upholstery.
 

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Hey all - anyone here have an information on a 76 mirage - getting some pictures and more info shortly - sounds like only about 200 made - thanks in advance
 

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1989 Brougham d'Elegance
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Hey IamCrom,

What you have to decide is the "reason" you want to make the purchase and the "amount " of money you are willing to spend. Because you will spend money. I agree with Long in regards to the "sentimental" value. Put it like this, I bought a 1989 d' Elegance because of nostalgic value; My Dad's last Cadillac he owned was a similar model. He had a cadillac going back as far as I could remember. I grew up taking trips to Louisiana in his Cadi's. So when I bought my 1989, I was not worried about the resell value, or if I could find one $500 cheaper, etc. I looked around and narrowed my decision down to two vehciles and decided on the one I bought. It needed work but I didn't care. Immediately had to put new set of tires, brake job, tune up, rear factory air shocks repaired, and upgraded hubcaps. Here is a pic (the bumper fillers have been repaired).

579758


A few weeks later I came across a 1969 convertible that I knew was going to cost me more than the vehicle's value. But I always wanted a convertible. And I always wanted to restore a car. I didn't know if I would be investing $5,000 or $20,000 into the convertible. This car was trashed! It was out in the weather, the convertible top was ruined, the interior was ruined, and I didnt even know if the engine would start. I lifted the hood and saw the engine was complete, but didn't know its true condition. The car needed to be towed away. I paid $1500, which I would never have paid for any other car in this condition. But I knew that I didn't want to regret not purchasing the car. Here is a pic of my convertible being loaded on the tow truck the day I bought it. Look at the interior!

579759


So, I suggest that you not look at your purchase as an investment that will return more money in the future. Any classic you buy will probably be a "money pit," unless you buy one that has already been restored. Which in that case the car will cost you much more than $6,000. I think the reason most people buy classic Cadi's is because of their love of the car; and what kind of value do you place on that?

I would encourage you to find the year, make, model you like/want. Then negotiate a fair price (what you want to spend). Then buy the car, enjoy it, and be prepared to spend more money on it; but most of all enjoy the car.

Hope this helps. Good luck. Oh, and dont forget to return to this forum and let us know how it worked out for you. Post pics of your purchase.
 
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