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Will be putting new rotors and pads on the front of my 94 sedan Deville and rear pads, (with rotors if needed). It's been a while since I've done a brake job, (and never with front and rear rotors). and also never with an abs system. Anything special that I should know, or any special tools that I'll need for doing the job on my car. Also have purchaced the pads and rotors already, but what about any other brake hardware. Thanks for looking and am plannin ondoing the job tommorow morning, so any responce will be appreciated.
 

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1989 Sedan DeVille is now just a fond memory ....
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I recently put new pads and had the rotors turned on mine. Nothing special that I did. I used a bar clamp to compress the slave back into the caliper. When you do that be sure to remove some fluid from the MC reservoir or it will overflow into the engine compartment especially with 4 wheel disk.

Tie your calipers up so as not to damage the break lines. Be sure to have some brake cleaner handy.
 

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Well, if you never did abs brake change, you will need a clamp to hold back the pressure on the brake pad to the rotor.....also make sure when u bleed the brakes for air in the line u have someone there to help you push the pedal...i dunno how you would do that urself...seems like u always need 2 people to do abs jobs... :)
 

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94 Eldorado, and a 99 ETC
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If you do the job like Kev said and don't open the bleeder valve, you will not need two people, and you don't need to bleed the brakes because air was not let into the line in the first place. The thing I don't like about doing it that way is that you push all the new, clean fluid out of the master cylender, and leave all the old, and probably dirty fluid in the lines.
 

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1999 STS - diamond white
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5,229 Posts
Krashed989 said:
If you do the job like Kev said and don't open the bleeder valve, you will not need two people, and you don't need to bleed the brakes because air was not let into the line in the first place. The thing I don't like about doing it that way is that you push all the new, clean fluid out of the master cylender, and leave all the old, and probably dirty fluid in the lines.
The solution would be to go ahead and bleed the brakes.
If you attach a hose to the valve and run the other end into to a clear, clean jar, you can tell when fresh brake fluid makes it thru to each valve. Do this to all 4 wheels and you will have pushed the moisture and old, degraded fluid out.
 

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94 ETC,97 STS
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You should NOT push old fluid back through an ABS system. Run a bleeder hose from the caliper and open the bleeder screw before you push the piston back into the caliper. Let the old fluid out into a bottle.

Otherwise you take the chance of getting dirt under the ABS seals. Similar to reverse flushing a transmission.
 

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'80 Fleetwood Coupe, 1994 and 1995 Mercedes 140 Coupe
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Old brake fluid can be bad news for ABS systems. Running certain ABS systems dry can be even worse. Bleeding is not simple and can require steps beyond the capabilities of weekend meck-a-nicks. Always avoid anything that will introduce air into an ABS equipped system. One way to do this without pushing old fluid back through the system is to pinch off the rubber brake hose, crack the bleeder screw open, then push the caliper piston back in. Tighten the bleeder. Install the new pads. Fill the master cylinder. Pump the brakes a bunch of times to get pedal feel. Keep an eye on the master cylinder level. Don't run it dry. Go back and crack each bleeder screw while an assistant holds the service pedal down. Before opening the bleeders, tap each caliper lightly with a small Ford Wrench (hammer) Brass is the best type. This will float any air bubbles that could be hanging out on unmachined internal caliper casting. There are speciality tools made to pinch off brake hoses. This is done all the time. It will not ruin an otherwise good hose.
Be sure to use a torque wrench for final torque of lug nuts. I'm stuck in bold type! Help! How did I do this?
 

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98 Deville, '15 Ford Fusion Hybrid Titanium, '12 Ford Escape
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bob'scaddy said:
What's the spec's to torque the lug nuts
I belive it is 100ft lbs. it is on my Chrysler and I think last time I checked the FSM on the Seville it was the same. I always do mine to 100lbs.
 

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2005 Escalade 6.0L 2WD, 2007 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited CRD
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100 lbs-ft. Both my '94 Deville and my STS call for that amount of torque.

Also, every time I do a brake job, I bleed the brakes to get the old fluid out. The fluid inside the caliper is usually discolored from the heat it gets. I use a power bleeder and it makes doing it by yourself SO easy!
 
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