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2015 Mazda3 S GT Hatchback 2013 Kia Optima SXL
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Discussion Starter #1
Well it was that time of the year again. Time to flush out the old brake fluid for some new stuff. I bought a new Mity-Vac air operated bleeder for the task. It makes bleeding simpler than easy. Very nice tool. Anyway, a few weeks ago I had replaced my left rear brake line, and I had major issues with the bleeder screw on that caliper. It took me two hours to remove it. Today I tried loosening the right rear bleeder screw, and it wouldn't budge. I shot it with penetrant, wire brushed around it, waited about an hour, shot more penetrant. Well the damn thing snapped off. So I figured I would try the fronts. They loosened no problem. So now I had to figure a way to get the broken screw out of the caliper. While thinking, I was checking Ebay. What do you know, a brand new OEM right rear caliper is right there. Just snatched it up for $36 shipped. So I will not be extracting that screw, just replacing the whole caliper.

Anyhow, does anyone know why the rear bleeder screws seem to weld themselves to the caliper? I was thinking heat build-up, but the front brakes should be hotter than the rears. And the fronts weren't an issue. Do you think I should coat the rear screws with anti-sieze compound? I really do not want to go through this again next year. Any thoughts.

Don
 

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1996 Eldorado Sport Coupe, 2009 Black Navigator
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5,032 Posts
Strange my rear bleeder screws gave me no problem but the front passenger's side would'nt budge. I had to just leave it alone.
 

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1996 Deville (sold), 2000 Mustang GT
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1,300 Posts
I had the same problem on my bronco, ended up with two new front calipers. I think mine were seized in there because of rust (used to have a plow on it), but I think the heat of the brakes and amount of dust contribute to them freezing up. I put anti-seize on the bleeder screws now to avoid having to buy new calipers everytime i bleed the brakes.
 

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White Diamond '03 DHS (with DTS floor shift)
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Anti seize is the first thing that came to my mind when I read the topic. I would definitely put some on, sparingly of coarse.
 

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Definitely need anti-seize, but even then with years of no attention, it could happen again. I had it happen on a car before and had to buy a new caliper.
 

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2015 Mazda3 S GT Hatchback 2013 Kia Optima SXL
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Discussion Starter #6
I guess that I'll use the anti-seize on them. I just wasn't sure if it would mix and clog something up. I think I will buy new screws for the front calipers also and coat them as well. This is the first time I ever had an issue with bleeder screws, and want it to be my last. It definitely isn't fun messing with them. But at least it gives me the incentive to install the right side parking brake cable. I will do that when the new caliper gets here.

Don
 

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1996 Deville (sold), 2000 Mustang GT
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Best way to avoid it besides the anti-seize would be to periodically bleed your brakes, its a good thing to do anyway.
 

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White Diamond '03 DHS (with DTS floor shift)
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I guess that I'll use the anti-seize on them. I just wasn't sure if it would mix and clog something up.
My guess is that it would Don. That is why I said sparingly.
 

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1997 Eldorado, 2003 Audi RS6
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Don't even need to periodically bled, at least not at every brake job. I do follow BMW's service guidelines and do a complete brake fluid change on my car every two years though... A Cadillac might not be a BMW, but it can't hurt. If you don't want to do that, just turn it by the smallest perceptible amount, say 5% of a turn, every time you have the wheel off. Remember to not turn it enough to open it. Also, ALWAYS use a six sided box wrench! Twelve point sockets are not ideal for bleeder screws!
 

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2015 Mazda3 S GT Hatchback 2013 Kia Optima SXL
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Discussion Starter #11
Well I am going to add more workload to myself once the caliper gets here. I will replace the caliper, replace all bleeders with new units (with small amount of anti-seize on each), install parking brake cable, and replace the brake line I repaired a few weeks ago. So I will be a busy guy hopefully this Saturday.

I also ordered new radiator hoses and belts from www.rockauto.com. So as long as they arrive, I will swap those out also. Sounds like all day for me. God help me

Don
 

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1999 STS - diamond white
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5,229 Posts
Don, I Googled the topic. Using anti-seize on the bleeder screw is pretty common practice.
Good call. I think it ought to be added to the tech tips :thumbsup:
 

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2004 Escalade, 07 Road King, 08 Challenger SRT8
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I snapped one off on my Tahoe once too... it can happen.
 

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2015 Mazda3 S GT Hatchback 2013 Kia Optima SXL
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Discussion Starter #16
Brake line is officially repaired. I bent up the new line (I had to be creative as the new line was 60" long, and the repair only called for about 55"), bubble flared the existing line, used the metric bubble flare union, bleed the brakes, and no leaks. I got it up to about 25 mph and hammered the brake pedal several times. The neighbors are probably still asking themselves what is wrong with me. Drove back home, checked for leaks, and the repair is bone dry. I took one extra step this time and wrapped the new line with electrical tape. Hopefully this will delay rusting in the future. Now if my other parts would just get here.

Don
 
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