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2005 ESV
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78 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I decided to tackle the transmission fluid and filter change this weekend and what a pain that turned out to be. I started by changing the black fluid in the transfer case (yes, black. Not blue, not red, although I think it used to be red) and refilled it with some Dexron VI, then moved onto the transmission.

Well, after finishing up the second filter (I ordered the wrong one from Rock Auto and after spending a few hours trying to figure out why the pan wouldn't flush up to the case I figured out the mistake, and then had to walk to Auto Zone for replacement).

I finally got the new pan on, torqued up the bolts in the proper sequence in three passes, and all was well. Dumped 4 quarts in and watched for leaks...and I got one. The fluid is just pouring out the front of the pan. Double checked the torque settings in the service manual that I have and I torqued them to the correct spec's; 97 in lbs.

Apparently, after doing a little digging on here, I've come to the conclusion that is NOT the proper torque for those bolts and it should be 10-11.8 Ft lbs. Wonderful. I thought they felt a little soft....

So my question is, can I just finish torqueing the bolts down to the 10-11.8 Ft lbs, or is my chance at a solid seal now completed shot due to the ATF on the gasket? Am I going to need to drop the pan again, clean it all up really good, replace the gasket, and do it all again?

I was hoping to tackle the differentials tomorrow, not spend another day futzing with the darn transmission. I even took the day off of work today to finish this up.
 

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2005 ESV
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78 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Just a quick update. I took a few minutes on my lunch hour to crawl under there are torque those bolts up to the correct 16 NM (11.8 Ft lbs). There was almost no turning necessary, maybe a 1/8th or 1/16th of a turn.

After I was done, I was looking at where the pan was leaking, and noticed that a drop of ATF was hanging directly on a barely noticeable "line". Ran my finger across that line and sure enough, the brand new pan is bent. I am so flippin' unthrilled about that.

So now, I'll be draining the gallon of ATF out of that pan and putting the old pan back on (thankfully it has a plug, which is the whole reason that I went with a new pan).

Does anyone think that it'll be beneficial to try and hammer that area of the pan flat (upside down, using the flat end of a 3/8 socket extension)? Or just fuggit, put the old pan back on and call it a day? Maybe Rock-Auto will overnight me a replacement if I get cranky with 'em.
 

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'05 Escallade ESV Plat., '16 Z51 Corvette, '03 Avalanche, 12 Lexus IS350C
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162 Posts
I've never had good luck trying the straighten an oil pan that had a bent rail unless I was only using Ultra-Black like on a differential cover.
 

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2005 ESV
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78 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I've never had good luck trying the straighten an oil pan that had a bent rail unless I was only using Ultra-Black like on a differential cover.
Yeah, I figured that it would just mangle the pan and cause more damage than good. I have a replacement on the way now, but it'll take a few days to get here. I guess it'll have to do, especially considering the fact that I won't be able to tackle it until this weekend anyways. Needless to say, I will be scrutinizing the heck out of that new pan when it arrives.
 

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2006 Escalade AWD w/DiabloSport tuner,Jet Performance throttle body/MAF,Airaid MIT
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1,430 Posts
Just a quick update. I took a few minutes on my lunch hour to crawl under there are torque those bolts up to the correct 16 NM (11.8 Ft lbs). There was almost no turning necessary, maybe a 1/8th or 1/16th of a turn.

After I was done, I was looking at where the pan was leaking, and noticed that a drop of ATF was hanging directly on a barely noticeable "line". Ran my finger across that line and sure enough, the brand new pan is bent. I am so flippin' unthrilled about that.

So now, I'll be draining the gallon of ATF out of that pan and putting the old pan back on (thankfully it has a plug, which is the whole reason that I went with a new pan).

Does anyone think that it'll be beneficial to try and hammer that area of the pan flat (upside down, using the flat end of a 3/8 socket extension)? Or just fuggit, put the old pan back on and call it a day? Maybe Rock-Auto will overnight me a replacement if I get cranky with 'em.
I would just go with a new pan. Unless you are good at metal working.
 

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2005 ESV
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78 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Was it bent when you got it or did it get bent trying to tighten it down on the wrong filter.
It had to be bent when I got it. It is such a minimal bend that I didn't notice it until it was installed. I never even tried to thread any of the bolts with the wrong filter, nor force it for fear of breaking something internal to the transmission. I had my kid gloves on, for sure.

I would just go with a new pan. Unless you are good at metal working.
Negative. I'm decent with wood, but anything I try to do with metal winds up looking like a child did it. :)
The replacement is on the way.
 

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310 Posts
It had to be bent when I got it. It is such a minimal bend that I didn't notice it until it was installed. I never even tried to thread any of the bolts with the wrong filter, nor force it for fear of breaking something internal to the transmission. I had my kid gloves on, for sure.



Negative. I'm decent with wood, but anything I try to do with metal winds up looking like a child did it. :)
The replacement is on the way.
Ok also I would buy a anew gasket just to be safe.
 

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2005 ESV
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78 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Mission accomplished!!

I got the new pan in yesterday and finished it up this morning. Once I pulled the damaged pan off, you could definitely tell that it was bent, and there was no indentation on the gasket at that spot:

gasket.png

I did end up reusing that gasket, mainly because I knew that it hadn't been torqued down excessively nor had the engine even been started, so I felt confident that wasn't going to cause any problems. Torqued the pan bolts down to 5, 8, 10, then finally 11.8 ft-lbs and not a leak. Brought the engine up to temp, got it out on the road (my driveway is at a slight incline) and filled it up to the bottom of the hot crosshatch on the dipstick. Took it for a test drive and I swear the transmission temps are lower and it has a helluva lot more get-up-and-go. Did a final check on the fluid level and it's a little under halfway on the hot crosshatch.

My wife ended up taking the truck to go do some running, and about five minutes later I got the following text:

text_from_mrs.png

:cool:

Phew, transmission and transfer case are done! Now I get to go clean up my mess in the driveway. Differentials tomorrow.

I can't thank everyone on these forums enough. Even all of the old threads on this job have been a HUGE help. My gut reaction when I saw the leak was to torque the crap out of the bolts and tighten that pan up, but having read enough of the advice given by folks who know a heck of a lot more than I do, I knew that would not solve the problem and would likely cause a bigger issue.

The only advice that I can give to anyone else who's thinking about tackling this job is to get a T40 socket for that darn shift cable. There are two bolts holding that bracket in place on the TOP of the transmission case. Remove the bolt farthest back completely, and loosen, but don't remove, the one in the front. That will give you enough clearance to get the pan out and back in. There was a lot of feeling around up there but it wasn't too hard.

Overall, it was a much easier job the second time around than the first.

Thank you everybody for all of your wisdom and advice!
 
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