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Discussion Starter #1
Highly considering getting one of these braces after dealing with parade clunking/ rubber banding. Was wondering if anybody had any positive experiences with these or if anyone has an old one to sell.
 

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Installed the Gen1V.com Trailing Arm Brace.

Reduced wheel hop to nearly zero...VERY solid feel now.

FYI.

Cheap and easy install. Although lock-tite those bolts - trust me...lol
 

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I haven't. I have heard about it before.
I do get rubber banding sometimes when I let off in 1st/2nd gear.
Only upgrades I have is CS diff bushing and CS diff block in addition to CS UCA bushings.

I have yet to experience wheel hop really, I guess I never fully dump the clutch but I have been pretty aggressive with my take offs without any.

But what I'm really wondering is, when I go supercharged down the road would this kit allow my stock diff handle 500-600 rwhp?
 

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Interesting, so darkman according to the different feedback we have on this forum so far, the source of wheel hop is the axles, the diff weak casing doesn't help the situation.

Upgrading the axles prevents it from happening. And it looks like adding the diff brace mitigates the side effects?
 

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Interesting, so darkman according to the different feedback we have on this forum so far, the source of wheel hop is the axles, the diff weak casing doesn't help the situation.

Upgrading the axles prevents it from happening. And it looks like adding the diff brace mitigates the side effects?
The conclusion that asymmetric axles reduce wheel hop originated with GM engineers in their design work on the second-generation CTS-V. This conclusion has been supported on this forum with the retrofitting of asymmetric axles on V1s.

When it comes to differential bracing, the reports on this forum are mixed. I don't recall reports of differential braces significantly reducing wheel hop. The braces can reduce the amount of "felt" drive line clunk during times of slow operation - e.g. backing out of your driveway, or in stop and go traffic.

The braces cannot eliminate drive line lag completely because much of it originates in the differential clutch packs that are unaffected by external bracing. This can be observed by lifting the rear wheels off the ground and turning the drive shaft by hand. The drive shaft will rotate a full quarter turn before the rear wheels move.

Differential braces, based on reports on this forum, can increase vibration and noise transmitted to the cabin. There also have been reports where differential bracing led to breakage presumably because the differential carrier was not allowed to flex under extreme stress. I think differential braces can be used safely as long as you play road racer and not drag racer. If you side step the clutch with the engine at redline to launch the car, and/or shift through the gears using the clutch but keeping the throttle nailed- something will break.
 

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What you say makes sense darkman.

I'm wondering, if one were able to practically eliminate wheel hop completely, like lets say through a very good set of asymmetric axles. Does the stock diff have the capacity to handle lets say 500-600 RWTQ?

Why I'm asking is that for my 07 V, I'm slowly but surely working towards reaching a target of 600RWHP.

I have started my trans rebuild and twin clutch upgrade, I have been researching supercharger kits for months...now I'm saying to myself, if I get assymetric axles will my third gen V1 diff (part# 15793756) fall apart at that performance level or is a ford 8.8 diff a must in that situation assymetric axles or not.

As a side note this will be a road racer if you will and definitely not a drag racer build.
 

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I think the stock differential with asymmetric axles can survive spirited street driving with 500 RWHP. This durability comes in part because of wheel spin, which will prevent the drive train from taking the full strain of 500 RWHP in the lower gears. A set of sticky tires, like drag radials would change this equation.

I don't know how the stock differential would fair if subjected to 600 RWHP.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The conclusion that asymmetric axles reduce wheel hop originated with GM engineers in their design work on the second-generation CTS-V. This conclusion has been supported on this forum with the retrofitting of asymmetric axles on V1s.

When it comes to differential bracing, the reports on this forum are mixed. I don't recall reports of differential braces significantly reducing wheel hop. The braces can reduce the amount of "felt" drive line clunk during times of slow operation - e.g. backing out of your driveway, or in stop and go traffic.

The braces cannot eliminate drive line lag completely because much of it originates in the differential clutch packs that are unaffected by external bracing. This can be observed by lifting the rear wheels off the ground and turning the drive shaft by hand. The drive shaft will rotate a full quarter turn before the rear wheels move.

Differential braces, based on reports on this forum, can increase vibration and noise transmitted to the cabin. There also have been reports where differential bracing led to breakage presumably because the differential carrier was not allowed to flex under extreme stress. I think differential braces can be used safely as long as you play road racer and not drag racer. If you side step the clutch with the engine at redline to launch the car, and/or shift through the gears using the clutch but keeping the throttle nailed- something will break.
Thanks for this awesome reply. This is exactly the answer I was looking for in this thread. I was really worried about the strain on the diff due to additional bracing vs the potential benefits of the brace. My main reason for wanting it was to reduce the movement happening in the rear end of the driveline and subsequent clunking and "lag" (obviously not completely able to be eliminated on the stock diff). My V is my daily and I, of course, like to roll race once in a while. So it seems like the brace would be a good option for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I think the stock differential with asymmetric axles can survive spirited street driving with 500 RWHP. This durability comes in part because of wheel spin, which will prevent the drive train from taking the full strain of 500 RWHP in the lower gears. A set of sticky tires, like drag radials would change this equation.

I don't know how the stock differential would fair if subjected to 600 RWHP.
I agree completely with this. Street tires I reckon would be fine with 500whp on the stock diff as long as the rest of the rear end is upgraded to reduce wheel hop. I wouldn't run drag radials at all though, that's just asking for it. 600hp is def where the diff is in unknown territory. I'd have money aside for that 8.8 if you are at 600whp on the stock diff lol.
 

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Trailing Arm Brace is suppose to be for reduced wheel hop, not the diff brace. Diff brace is just more support for the diff. I'm about to order the TAB as a few on the V1 FB have noted significant reduction in wheel hop with using just the TAB.
 
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