Cadillac Owners Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I will try to keep this short:

2006 CTS 3.6L. Months ago I started getting warning lights 1. "Service Stability" 2. "Service steering Sys" 3. "Service Brake sys" 4. ABS
C0550 was the relevant code. I determined the ABS/EBCM module was the problem and I sent it off to be rebuilt by myairbags dot com rebuild service.
The module was returned without diagnosis or report as to what was bad. It did not change a thing.

I took the CTS to a large reputable shop locally and their diagnosis was something internal in the EBCM module was bad. I called myairbags dot com and thy claim it was rebuilt and bench tested. I then decided to pay $140 diagnosis at my local cadillac dealership. Same diagnosis bad EBCM and $1300 to repair.

I am considering buying an EBCM programmed for my VIN as I don't want to pay $1300 for an EBCM that has already been "fixed".

What should be my next move? This has already dragged on for months. I have already spent alot of time and over $500 to get no where and had to wire in my own brake light switch as the brake lights were stuck on until this problem is resolved.

Thanks for your time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Should I pay the 1300, deal with myairbags.com, or look for another module and just put it on myself?
 

·
Registered
08 STS 1SG HUD ACC F55 AWD, 08 STS 1SG Platinum HUD ACC F55 RWD
Joined
·
287 Posts
Short form - Check your wiring. For more see the long form below.

Long form - Many mechanics and others check the codes and see " something is wrong with XXX module" and say replace the module. Sometimes the problem is the module - sometimes the connectors and/or the wiring. Before buying any module for my STS (applies to any other car as well), I would suggest carefully checking the connections and wiring. When I do this, every connector gets a dose of DeOxit D5 and after it dries a coating of dielectric grease. This is usually much cheaper and surprisingly fixes lots if not most problems with electronic modules. Yes- it takes more time and requires some mechanical skill but I am retired and want to get out of the house. Good luck with your problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
DeOxit D5
Thanks that sounds like good advice. Let me give a quick background I left out so as not to make my first post too long.

This problem began last summer and it happened ocassionally when I finally noticed it was temperature related. It didn't happen in warm weather but when the temp dropped boom it happened every time. I then tried to isolate what needed to get warm enough in order for the problem to go away. When the temps were cool I would put a hair dryer on the module and the problem went away....temporarily. I decided heat was expanding metal somewhere inside the module....solder perhaps? a circuit of some sort? a bad ground? (I could never find the ground but these EBCM grounds sometimes do fail from what I have read) a resistor/capacitor etc...inside the module.

Your advice could very well be correct. It seems if there were a bad connection between 2 wires/connection points heat would expanded that metal until it stretched too much? After seeing my back story do you still have the same advice? Just checking.
 

·
Registered
08 STS 1SG HUD ACC F55 AWD, 08 STS 1SG Platinum HUD ACC F55 RWD
Joined
·
287 Posts
Same advice. You are already out the rebuild costs with no reward (fixed car). My method may cost $20 for DeOxit and dielectric + time but has a chance of success. I like the investigation with the hair dryer which would cause me to look closely at the connectors at the EBCM. Suggest using a 10X or 20X jewelers loupe to look at each pin and socket. Do you think you ran the hair dryer long enough to actually warm the circuit board inside the case? If so you could non-destructively open the case and inspect each solder joint. A wire can break inside the insulation and look good but have an intermitent connection so some gentle wiggling of wires would be in order. Good Luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Same advice. You are already out the rebuild costs with no reward (fixed car). My method may cost $20 for DeOxit and dielectric + time but has a chance of success. I like the investigation with the hair dryer which would cause me to look closely at the connectors at the EBCM. Suggest using a 10X or 20X jewelers loupe to look at each pin and socket. Do you think you ran the hair dryer long enough to actually warm the circuit board inside the case? If so you could non-destructively open the case and inspect each solder joint. A wire can break inside the insulation and look good but have an intermitent connection so some gentle wiggling of wires would be in order. Good Luck
I have a jewelers loop if I can get the wiring out it is in a super tight spot.

More back story: I would have to heat it pretty aggressively for a long time so yes that made me believe a cracked solder inside the module. I did take the module off before the rebuild and sweated(?) solder joints I could reach. That didnt work so I sent it in for rebuild. What bothered me on the rebuild is there was no paperwork to say it was bad or good or what they fixed. Just a receipt. At one point I called them because I wanted to know what was wrong with the module and what they fixed and the woman I spoke too didnt seem to know. She called over a tech and then spouted off something about bad capacitors and that it was bench tested as fully functional. It sounded like a canned answer. I doubted her answer.

I may have sent in a good module for rebuild if there is a bad connection somewhere as you suggested.
Thanks for your time. I will have to come back after I do what you said.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top