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2001 Deville DTS
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136 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
We got 14" of snow over 24 hours this weekend. This is my first major storm without 4WD in about 10 years. Inherently I knew the Deville would be OK in winter driving, big and front wheel drive, but I was still surprised how well it did. I have new tires on, but not snow tires. Just by chance I had to put quite a few miles and trips on through this storm and here's what I LIKE about my Deville:

- The auto wipers do a good job recognizing the snow accumulation, don't have to mess with it too much.
- Obviously rough roads: I like the fact that the car still isn't squeaky or rattly, even when cold.
- ABS is smooth and not nearly as noisy (shocking) as other types.
- Traction Engaged happens quite frequently at take off or in the deep stuff, but it happens seamlessly and quiet. (I have still to determine if it's using the ABS?) I might not even know it was on if I wasn't watching the cluster.
- The car does go through deep stuff, wasn't a time I thought I was stuck. Just stayed steady and easy on the throttle, let the Traction Engaged do it's thing, turn the wheel back and forth. There was a time or two I was dragging belly for a while.
Unfortunately I never turned off the Traction Control to compare.

All in all, that is about the worst around here I will have to drive through, and I'm confident I can make it without 4WD!
 

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Super Moderator
White Diamond '03 DHS (with DTS floor shift)
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87,177 Posts
T/C does utilize ABS. If that doesn't help, then it will start to drop cylinders.
 

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2001 DHS
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221 Posts
I had a 2011 BMW 5 series x-drive (awd) and this is the first actual winter I'm driving my Deville. I was very surprised as to how well it performs in snow (with 4 snow tires of course) even compared to the awd newer technology B<W. Specially the stability system. I tried several times in an open lot to make the tail spin out of control and it would correct itself so well, hats off to Caddy.
 

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2001 Seville STS, 1990 Seville (RIP), 1972 Sedan Deville
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26,323 Posts
Avaya, next time you get stuck in the deep stuff, turn TC off. Most of the time you need consistent power and some wheel spin to get out. TC is good if you hit a slippery patch while already in motion, not so much for accelerating from a stop in snow.
 

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2011 Crown Vic LX, 2009 Chevy Malibu 2LT
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5,607 Posts
I found that the TC actually HELPS in the deep stuff.

These old GM FWD's use an open diff - which means in low traction situations, the wheel with the least resistance spins. Not very helpful. If the TC applies the brake on the spinning wheel, the opposite side, which has more traction, now spins and helps move the vehicle.

This can be a problem with some of the newer drive-by-wire cars, whose TC systems simply limit engine power rather than apply the brakes. In those cases, the spinning wheel continues to spin, just more slowly :/ THEN it's beneficial to turn it off.
 

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2001 Seville STS, 1990 Seville (RIP), 1972 Sedan Deville
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26,323 Posts
Yeah braking the spinning wheel does act as a "sort of" limited slip. But in my experiences at least, trying to park, going up hill, or starting from a stop in deeper snow, the TC makes it very hard to impossible to move. I've actually had the car (not just the Seville) start inching it's way backwards down a hill while the TC was trying to maintain traction. Turned it off and slowly powered my way up.

Nice thing is, it's as simple as pressing the button to give it a try. There was no way to quickly defeat TC in my Town Car. So in the winter, the ABS fuse got put in the glove box :yup: .
 
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