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2000 Deville & 2009 CTS-V
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

My grandfather's 2000 Deville with 80k on it has started leaking oil, it went from being a rock solid daily drive to suddenly leaking oil and he said when he started it, it made some sort of banging noise.

I checked the oil, found it to be low so I did not start it. I plan to get more oil (5w-30, right?) tomorrow and add it, then start the car.

Is this a common issue with these cars? If so, where does it usually leak from? Also, any idea on the sound?

KJ
 

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White Diamond '03 DHS (with DTS floor shift)
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86,788 Posts
You need to narrow down the leak area. Might just be an oil filter adapter gasket.

The knocking or "banging noise" sounds like cold carbon rap. Gramps is babying it too much. You need to "borrow" it once a month and give it a good whoop'in aka WOT. If you are not familiar with the proceedure, here is what our former friend and guru said.

"There are many advantages to occasional full throttle accelerations with a Northstar and any engine.

It keeps the carbon cleaned out of the combustion chamber. This is maybe a little more important with the Northstar than some other engines due to the tight squish volumes between the piston and the cylinder head. It's designed this way to promote good in-cylinder mixture motion (good combustion) but it has the down side of providing a ready place for carbon build-up to touch the piston - causing noise. Ever heard of the Northstar "cold carbon rap" problem?? Simply put you'll hear a rythmic, piston slap-like noise when the engine is cold. Very prominent and very annoying. Cause: excessive carbon build up causing the the piston to contact the carbon on the head - causing it to rock in the bore and "slap" Much more evident when the engine is cold and the pistons haven't expanded to full diameter yet. Simplest and easiest "fix" for this: A few good WOT (wide open throttle) accelerations to clear the carbon out. That is all it takes to eliminate the problem and prevent it from re-occurring.

Occasional WOT accelerations also help seat the rings to the ring lands and exercise the rings and keep them mobile and from becoming stuck in carbon in the ring lands. At high RPM and WOT the rings move around on the piston - they actually rotate on the piston and will polish away any carbon and seat themselves to the sides of the ring grooves. This is especially important on the 2000 and later Northstars which had hard anodized top ring lands on the pistons. Very hard and wear resistant - also harder to break-in and seat the rings to the sides of the ring-lands to promote the best possible seal. Many oil consumption complaints on the 2000 and later engines are related, to some extent, with the rings never seating to the sides of the ring-grooves due to lack of load as the engine was babied around forever. Even engines with rings stuck in the ring-grooves due to carbon build up can eventually be freed up with enough high RPM operation.

WOTs warm up the engine thoroughly and clean out the exhaust due to temperature in the exhaust and high flow rates blasting particles, rust and such out of the system.

Frequent WOT operation will not hurt the engine or the transmission. They're designed for that. The healthiest engines that I have seen at high miles are always the ones that are run the hardest. Rings are free on the pistons and sealing; no carbon buildup.

The exercise that I think works best for many things is to select manual 2nd gear on an isolated stretch of expressway. This takes the transmission shifting out of the question if you are worried about hurting it. Start at 55 MPH or so and go to WOT in 2nd gear and hold it until the RPM reaches near the normal shift point - i.e. 6500 for an L37 and 6000 for an LD8. Hold the throttle wide open until the engine reaches, say, 6200 for an STS and then just let completely off the throttle. Leave the transmission in 2nd so that the engine brakes the car and creates some pretty heavy over-run conditions at high vacuum levels. Let it slow until it is about 55 or so and then go to WOT again and repeat. This exercise really loads the rings, allows variable RPM operation at WOT for several seconds continuously, creates heavy over-run which tends to unload the rings and make them move and thus exercise them in the ring grooves and it will blow-out carbon and the exhaust - all without creating a spectical of yourself and attracting the attention of cops. You can do it on most any freeway and stay within the 70-75 MPH range allowable. Once a week like this will keep the engine cleaned out and healthy and is DEFINITELY recommended for the Northstar in particular.

The Northstar engine was designed/developed/validated to be run hard. It was expected that people would use the performance of the engine - which few people seem to do. The biggest single problem that many issues stem from is lack of use at full throttle by the owners. It just doesn't like to be babied around. The rings are low-tension by design for good high RPM operating characteristics and low friction/good power. They work best if "used" and kept free.

In every conversation with owners I have had, once the owner started doing the WOTs and using the power of the engine they report no more carbon rap, better oil economy, no "smoke" when they do light it up (keep the exhaust cleaned out. If you notice a "cloud" at WOT then you are not doing enough WOTs...) etc... A bit of judicious use of the other end of the throttle travel is a GOOD thing."
 

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Registered
2000 Deville & 2009 CTS-V
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21 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Thanks Ranger,

I went by there today and put in 2 quarts of oil, started it up and it didnt make any really obvious noises, although did sound just a tad trucklike....not sure what that is a result of, heck it could even be normal but I dont drive that car much, so I wouldn't know.

I was about to take it for a quick drive around the block but the emergency brake light was on, I couldn't find a release for the e-brake so I figured maybe it was one that you push all the way to the floor and it releases, so I tried but it did not release....

Am I missing something here? or is it stuck? The manual is conviniently nowhere to be found...

Thanks,
KJ
 

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Super Moderator
White Diamond '03 DHS (with DTS floor shift)
Joined
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86,788 Posts
It should release when you put it in gear. Ther also is a manual release above the pedal, under the dash incase it fails. Just reach under there and feel around. It is a small lever. If you get dowm and look for it, be careful when you pull it. It hurts if you leave your head or hand in the way.
 
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