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OK, I thought I would do a write-up on this because it was such a pain to do, and I couldn't find all of the information on one site. So, here's my take on it. I hope this saves someone some time and aggravation. <br>
<br>
<br>
The reason I needed to do this was self imposed. . . I had some wheel spacers machined to for my 2005 CTS, so I had to install longer wheel studs. Here began the battle.<br>
<br>
<br>
<u><strong>REARS:</strong></u><br>
Lets start with the rears, cause that’s where I started. First thing to understand is that there is <u>NO</u> way to get those studs pushed out without removing the entire rear hub assembly (<em>unless you have snapped a stud off, but you will still have to remove the hubs even to put a stock length one back in.</em>)<br>
<ol class="decimal"><li>raise the vehicle, and put it on jack stands if you have them. (<em>You will want to use your jack to compress the suspension later. If you have 2 jacks you could skip the jack stands.</em>)</li><li>Do <u>not</u> set the parking break, so make sure you're on level ground and chock the front wheels to be safe.</li><li>remove the wheel.</li><li>use a C-clamp to compress the caliper so that its easier to remove/install.</li><li>Remove the 2 bolts that hold the calipers on, (<strong>18mm</strong> bolts)</li><li>slide the calipers off of the rotors and put them on a box or hang them from a coat hanger in the wheel well so that you are not tugging on the rubber break lines or crimping them. Don’t want to damage those. (Don't remove the brake lines.)</li><li>remove the the <strong>torx</strong> screw that holds the rotor in place. (be careful not to strip this. When you reinstall it put some anti-seize grease on it so that it always comes out nice and easy in the future. Its just there to hold the rotor in place during assembly.)</li><li>Remove the rotor. (Tip: If you left the parking brake on, you wont be able to remove the rotor.)</li><li>Remove the parking brake. It's shaped like a ”C”, just spread it open by hand (with brute force) and it will come off.</li><li>Disconnect the ABS sensor electrical connector.</li></ol><img src="http://www.cadillacforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=105800&stc=1" attachmentid="105800" alt="" id="vbattach_105800" class="previewthumb"><br>
<ol class="decimal"><li>Remove the parking brake cable bracket mounting bolts (2 of them) from the knuckle. (<strong>15mm bolts</strong>)</li></ol><img src="http://www.cadillacforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=105801&stc=1" attachmentid="105801" alt="" id="vbattach_105801" class="previewthumb"><ol class="decimal"><li>Remove the parking brake cable bracket from the knuckle, it will just pull out, and push it out of the way</li><li>Now remove the Axle Nut. I read there are different size nuts anywhere from 34mm to 36mm. Mine was a <strong>35mm</strong>. Its torqued on there good with plenty of thread locker, so use a breaker bar instead of a ratchet if you have it.</li></ol><img src="http://www.cadillacforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=105802&stc=1" attachmentid="105802" alt="" id="vbattach_105802" class="previewthumb"><br>
<br>
Now your finally down to the hub, but now starts the time consuming part of the process. This is a good time to spray everything down generously with WD40 and let it set for a bit<ol class="decimal"><li>Place your hub puller on now, and screw the center pin down. You will only be able to push the axle in by about 1mm or 2mm to start, but this small amount is critical in order to even have a chance at getting to the 3 (18mm) bolts that hold the hubs on. I was worried about jamming the gears back in the differential, but apparently they are fairly robust. Someone else can chime in here that knows more about this than me.</li></ol><img src="http://www.cadillacforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=105803&stc=1" attachmentid="105803" alt="" id="vbattach_105803" class="previewthumb"><ol class="decimal"><li>Remove the 3 (18mm) bolts that hold the hubs on. (<em>Note: I don't know what these are torqued to, but it must be close to 90-100 ft/lb. Maybe someone else here knows and could chime in?</em>) The two top ones are 'relatively' easy to get to with a wrench (I couldn't get a socket on any of them, there's just no room.) they are torqued down to something like 100 ft/lb so it takes a bit to get them moving and there is plenty of loc-tite on there from the factory as well. Now, the bottom bolt will bring out the swear words. (<em>You will have to get creative here after you run out of known swears words, you'll need to start combining them to form new curses in imaginative ways. Trust me, you will have plenty of motivation!</em>) Even after getting the axle pushed out 1-2mm, I still had to grind down my wrench to get it to slip in there.</li></ol><img src="http://www.cadillacforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=105804&stc=1" attachmentid="105804" alt="" id="vbattach_105804" class="previewthumb"><br>
<br>
<img src="http://www.cadillacforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=105805&stc=1" attachmentid="105805" alt="" id="vbattach_105805" class="previewthumb"><br>
<img src="http://www.cadillacforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=105806&stc=1" attachmentid="105806" alt="" id="vbattach_105806" class="previewthumb"><br>
<img src="http://www.cadillacforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=105807&stc=1" attachmentid="105807" alt="" id="vbattach_105807" class="previewthumb"><ol class="decimal"><li>Someone mentioned putting your jack under the control arm and raising it, or dropping it, to find another sliver of room to get to this bolt, and I found this was helpful. Once you get your 'modified' (<em>read nearly destroyed</em>) wrench in there you will only have room to turn it about 10 degrees at a time, so it will take about a half hour to fully remove this one bolt. Once you get the bolt started you can then put a turn or two on your hub puller giving more and more room to work as you are removing this lower hub bolt.</li></ol><img src="http://www.cadillacforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=105808&stc=1" attachmentid="105808" alt="" id="vbattach_105808" class="previewthumb"><ol class="decimal"><li>Once you get this last bolt out, the hub will just about fall out. (Notice that the ABS sensor electrical connector comes out of the top of the hub when you go to put it back in.)</li><li>Take the hub assembly to your bench and press or knock out your lug studs, and press in your new ones. If you cant press the new ones in, you can put a washer on it and then, flip your lug nut around and torque/pull it in.</li></ol><img src="http://www.cadillacforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=105809&stc=1" attachmentid="105809" alt="" id="vbattach_105809" class="previewthumb"><br>
<br>
Now reverse this whole process, and you'll be back on the road! This took me the whole day to do both rears, but I was figuring it out as I went, grinding down my good tools, and searching the internet for solutions. I didn't want to accept that someone actually engineered this to be so convoluted and messed up, but eventually I did. . . If I did it again, I could probably do both rears in about 4-5 hours?<br>
My other big question was whether or not you could reuse the axle nut. The service manuals say not to. I wanted to change mine, but I couldn't find any autoparts shop or web store that could even find a part listing for a non-V CTS. I did look it up on the dealer part list and ordered it (Part # R/L, <strong>10257766</strong>), but it was not the correct axle nut either. So, I just did what everyone else seems to have done and cleaned it up, put a bunch of loc-tite on it and torqued it to spec (<strong>118 ft/lb.</strong>)<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
<u><strong>Fronts:</strong></u><br>
As far as the fronts go, its much, much easier. If you are just replacing the stock studs you don’t need to remove the hubs. The hubs have a little notch in them for clearance of removing/inserting the studs. (Wouldn't it be nice if they remembered that when they designed the rears!!!) you just have to remove the calipers and rotors and you should be able to do everything you need to.<br>
If you're going with longer studs like I did, then you will still have to remove the front hubs to insert the new longer studs. Remove the calipers and rotors. Disconnect the ABS sensor electrical connector. The hub bolts, 3 of them again <strong>18mm</strong>, are much easier to get to, and the hubs should come right off. Like the rears, its helpful to raise or lower the suspension to get better access to the 3 hub bolts. (<em>The fronts don’t use an axle nut, and no parking brakes to mess with either.</em>) I had to tap around the edges lightly with a hammer to work them out, but was not a problem. When I put the hubs back on I put some anti-sieze grease around it so it would come out even easier if I ever have to remove them again<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
If anyone is wondering what offsets I went with, I went with 11mm in the front, and 20mm in the rear. I'm using stock 17” wheels and they look proper now, almost flush. This isn't very hard to do from a technical perspective, just ridiculously time consuming.
 

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07' CTS-V | 07' Lux 3.6 Volant-Borla-Vsways | 08' CTS 3.6 DI Performance
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There I fixed the code for you.

Excellent writeup BTW!

However...this is more useful when you need to replace the rear hubs. If memory serves me right I didn't need to remove my hub to replace rear studs ( I removed the hub to replace the hub itself yes). I simply hit the bad stud out with a hammer then I snaked it out by expanding the parking brake aside. Then I snaked in the new studs through seem in between the parking brake and the hub, then I fitted washers over the stud, then I ratcheted a lug nut on the stud till it went in completely.

So though the rear hubs do not have stud access holes the studs can still be replaced and I hope I'm not remembering anything wrong (I did this 6 months ago)


Here's a video that explains what I'm trying to say precisely:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=Xv5AROvt1Ro#t=75s

When I was replacing the rear hub I ran into the clearence hurdle you ran into, with not having enough clearence for a socket and ratchet when I was changing my rear hub. I didn't need to grind a wrench down or anything.

Instead I opened my toolbox and pulled out an 18mm 6-point metric wrench from my Crafstman 6-point wrench collection



I highly recommend using a 6-pt wrench for this application

I was able to tighten and loosen that nut in that tight space without fear of stripping the bolts at all.

OK, I thought I would do a write-up on this because it was such a pain to do, and I couldn't find all of the information on one site. So, here's my take on it. I hope this saves someone some time and aggravation.


The reason I needed to do this was self imposed. . . I had some wheel spacers machined to for my 2005 CTS, so I had to install longer wheel studs. Here began the battle.


REARS:
Lets start with the rears, cause that’s where I started. First thing to understand is that there is NO way to get those studs pushed out without removing the entire rear hub assembly (unless you have snapped a stud off, but you will still have to remove the hubs even to put a stock length one back in.)
  1. raise the vehicle, and put it on jack stands if you have them. (You will want to use your jack to compress the suspension later. If you have 2 jacks you could skip the jack stands.)
  2. Do not set the parking break, so make sure you're on level ground and chock the front wheels to be safe.
  3. remove the wheel.
  4. use a C-clamp to compress the caliper so that its easier to remove/install.
  5. Remove the 2 bolts that hold the calipers on, (18mm bolts)
  6. slide the calipers off of the rotors and put them on a box or hang them from a coat hanger in the wheel well so that you are not tugging on the rubber break lines or crimping them. Don’t want to damage those. (Don't remove the brake lines.)
  7. remove the the torx screw that holds the rotor in place. (be careful not to strip this. When you reinstall it put some anti-seize grease on it so that it always comes out nice and easy in the future. Its just there to hold the rotor in place during assembly.)
  8. Remove the rotor. (Tip: If you left the parking brake on, you wont be able to remove the rotor.)
  9. Remove the parking brake. It's shaped like a ”C”, just spread it open by hand (with brute force) and it will come off.
  10. Disconnect the ABS sensor electrical connector.

  1. Remove the parking brake cable bracket mounting bolts (2 of them) from the knuckle. (15mm bolts)
  1. Remove the parking brake cable bracket from the knuckle, it will just pull out, and push it out of the way
  2. Now remove the Axle Nut. I read there are different size nuts anywhere from 34mm to 36mm. Mine was a 35mm. Its torqued on there good with plenty of thread locker, so use a breaker bar instead of a ratchet if you have it.


Now your finally down to the hub, but now starts the time consuming part of the process. This is a good time to spray everything down generously with WD40 and let it set for a bit
  1. Place your hub puller on now, and screw the center pin down. You will only be able to push the axle in by about 1mm or 2mm to start, but this small amount is critical in order to even have a chance at getting to the 3 (18mm) bolts that hold the hubs on. I was worried about jamming the gears back in the differential, but apparently they are fairly robust. Someone else can chime in here that knows more about this than me.
  1. Remove the 3 (18mm) bolts that hold the hubs on. (Note: I don't know what these are torqued to, but it must be close to 90-100 ft/lb. Maybe someone else here knows and could chime in?) The two top ones are 'relatively' easy to get to with a wrench (I couldn't get a socket on any of them, there's just no room.) they are torqued down to something like 100 ft/lb so it takes a bit to get them moving and there is plenty of loc-tite on there from the factory as well. Now, the bottom bolt will bring out the swear words. (You will have to get creative here after you run out of known swears words, you'll need to start combining them to form new curses in imaginative ways. Trust me, you will have plenty of motivation!) Even after getting the axle pushed out 1-2mm, I still had to grind down my wrench to get it to slip in there.




  1. Someone mentioned putting your jack under the control arm and raising it, or dropping it, to find another sliver of room to get to this bolt, and I found this was helpful. Once you get your 'modified' (read nearly destroyed) wrench in there you will only have room to turn it about 10 degrees at a time, so it will take about a half hour to fully remove this one bolt. Once you get the bolt started you can then put a turn or two on your hub puller giving more and more room to work as you are removing this lower hub bolt.
  1. Once you get this last bolt out, the hub will just about fall out. (Notice that the ABS sensor electrical connector comes out of the top of the hub when you go to put it back in.)
  2. Take the hub assembly to your bench and press or knock out your lug studs, and press in your new ones. If you cant press the new ones in, you can put a washer on it and then, flip your lug nut around and torque/pull it in.


Now reverse this whole process, and you'll be back on the road! This took me the whole day to do both rears, but I was figuring it out as I went, grinding down my good tools, and searching the internet for solutions. I didn't want to accept that someone actually engineered this to be so convoluted and messed up, but eventually I did. . . If I did it again, I could probably do both rears in about 4-5 hours?
My other big question was whether or not you could reuse the axle nut. The service manuals say not to. I wanted to change mine, but I couldn't find any autoparts shop or web store that could even find a part listing for a non-V CTS. I did look it up on the dealer part list and ordered it (Part # R/L, 10257766), but it was not the correct axle nut either. So, I just did what everyone else seems to have done and cleaned it up, put a bunch of loc-tite on it and torqued it to spec (118 ft/lb.)



Fronts:
As far as the fronts go, its much, much easier. If you are just replacing the stock studs you don’t need to remove the hubs. The hubs have a little notch in them for clearance of removing/inserting the studs. (Wouldn't it be nice if they remembered that when they designed the rears!!!) you just have to remove the calipers and rotors and you should be able to do everything you need to.
If you're going with longer studs like I did, then you will still have to remove the front hubs to insert the new longer studs. Remove the calipers and rotors. Disconnect the ABS sensor electrical connector. The hub bolts, 3 of them again 18mm, are much easier to get to, and the hubs should come right off. Like the rears, its helpful to raise or lower the suspension to get better access to the 3 hub bolts. (The fronts don’t use an axle nut, and no parking brakes to mess with either.) I had to tap around the edges lightly with a hammer to work them out, but was not a problem. When I put the hubs back on I put some anti-sieze grease around it so it would come out even easier if I ever have to remove them again



If anyone is wondering what offsets I went with, I went with 11mm in the front, and 20mm in the rear. I'm using stock 17” wheels and they look proper now, almost flush. This isn't very hard to do from a technical perspective, just ridiculously time consuming.

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