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Community Lounge, Introductions and General Discussion Discussion, How GM should have done the 94-96 Fleetwood in General Discussion; around here, I can't say I've seen a 93-96 fleetwood with cracked dash. havent seen any b-bodies with cracked dashes ...
  1. #46
    cadillac kevin's Avatar
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    Re: How GM should have done the 94-96 Fleetwood

    around here, I can't say I've seen a 93-96 fleetwood with cracked dash. havent seen any b-bodies with cracked dashes either (but I have seen some nasty fade jobs)
    IMO, the problem with the 93-96 fwb was the dash. its crazy long, overly huge, too roundied, and blocks the mirrors. its like someone decided to fill a squared off dash with helium, and thats what they ended up with.
    real wood would have been nice but if you keep the plastic wood clean and don't smoke (thats a biggie), it looks really nice. some day when I'm rich and have nothing else left to do with my car, I might get the fake wood replaced with real wood, but until then, fake wood looks good enough for me.

  2. #47
    turbojimmy's Avatar
    turbojimmy is offline Cadillac Owners Connoisseur
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    Re: How GM should have done the 94-96 Fleetwood

    Quote Originally Posted by cadillac kevin View Post
    around here, I can't say I've seen a 93-96 fleetwood with cracked dash. havent seen any b-bodies with cracked dashes either (but I have seen some nasty fade jobs)
    [ jersey ]I've got your cracked dash right here....[ /jersey ] Mine's all kinds of cracked. The '96 wasn't like that though.

    And the wood thing. It's not a matter of groping it, but even the best plastic fake wood can't compare visually to nice, polished real wood. My mom had an '02 base Deville and I had an '01 DTS. She had plastic, I had wood (and I'm really uncomfortable saying "she" and "wood" in the same sentence where my mom is concerned). It was the first thing I noticed every time I drove her car. You can't get the shine or depth of real wood with a silk-screen over plastic. It's the little things that pop in a high-quality interior.

  3. #48
    N0DIH's Avatar
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    Re: How GM should have done the 94-96 Fleetwood

    LOL!

    My dash is cracking some, the more it sits the worse and there is significant discoloration too.

    I have alwayes liked the 93-96 Interior. Simple, ROOMY, comfortable (seats a little hard), everything right there to get to. Yes, I miss my gauges, but I didn't live for it either.




    Quote Originally Posted by Stingroo View Post
    .....So, interior gropers, why do you fondle your vehicles so?

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    Re: How GM should have done the 94-96 Fleetwood

    I honestly just don't understand the concept behind it. It's weird. They're cars, they are not to be groped.

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    Re: How GM should have done the 94-96 Fleetwood

    I guess I look at it this way. Cadillac made plastic look like wood. Why not use wood? Why not make it look like plastic? They went to a lot of work to make something fake look like something real to be cheap.

    My new car I just got has real wood, it doesn't FEEL much different than what is in my Fleetwood, but it does look at a lot better. Has a fresher look, not like a plastic shine on top of what is appearing to be wood.

    Big deal? Not really, it does look nicer. And matches my bedroom furniture.... That is just strange....

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    Re: How GM should have done the 94-96 Fleetwood

    Maybe it's because Cadillac's attempt at plastic wood looked so...plasticky. The real wood in the DHS and DTS looks great (and doesn't bend like plastic...found that out the hard way). I read where the leather in the Deville was tanned in a way that it had a specific, unique smell. It does. And it's nice. Not that I groped my leather or anything. Maybe some other unsavory things, but never groped it.

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    Re: How GM should have done the 94-96 Fleetwood

    The following is the transcript of an interview for business article in Fortune Magazine with Ross Perot in 1988. Ross says it all. It is a rather long post but it is well worth the reading.

    'THE GM SYSTEM IS LIKE A BLANKET OF FOG'

    By Thomas Moore and Ross Perot February 15, 1988

    (FORTUNE Magazine) – In a genial, three-hour interview recently in his Dallas office, Ross Perot spoke expansively to Fortune’s Thomas Moore about how he came to understand the depth of GM's troubles and how he began to formulate his plan for putting them right. Excerpts: We've got to nuke the GM system. We've got to throw away Sloan's book ((My Years With General Motors, former chairman Alfred P. Sloan Jr.'s description of GM's management system)). It's like the Old Testament -- frozen thousands of years ago. We still believe that we can find the right page and paragraph to give us the answer to any question we have today. When you get down to the guys who actually have their hands on things, they know what to do. They can design, engineer, and build the best products in the world. My question is: Why haven't we unleashed their potential? The answer is: the General Motors system. It's like a blanket of fog that keeps these people from doing what they know needs to be done. I come from an environment where, if you see a snake, you kill it. At GM, if you see a snake, the first thing you do is hire a consultant on snakes. Then you get a committee on snakes, and then you discuss it for a couple of years. The most likely course of action is -- nothing. You figure, the snake hasn't bitten anybody yet, so you just let him crawl around on the factory floor. We need to build an environment where the first guy who sees the snake kills it. At Electronic Data Systems employees were trained from the day they joined the company to spend all day serving the customer, getting results, being the best in the world -- not being good bureaucrats. At GM the stress is not on getting results -- on winning -- but on bureaucracy, on conforming to the GM system. You get to the top of General Motors not by doing something, but by not making a mistake. You form groups, hold meetings, get consensuses, don't make decisions. You just kind of let this big old log keep rolling, knowing that sooner or later you're going to retire and get a big retirement anyhow. One day I made a speech to some senior executives. I said, ''Okay, guys, I'm going to give you the whole code on what's wrong. You don't like your customers. You don't like your dealers. You don't like the people who make your cars. You don't like your stockholders. And, to a large extent, you don't like one another. ''For this company to win, we're going to have to love our customers. We're going to have to stop fretting about dealers who make too much money and hope they make $1 billion a year through us. The guys on the factory floor are the salt of the earth -- not mad-dog, rabid, burn-the-plant-down radicals. And all this sniping at one another -- the financial guys vs. the car guys -- is terribly destructive.'' Of course, it was a waste of time to make that statement. I GOT MY FIRST INDICATION that consumers would stop buying many GM cars because of the large number of calls I received from customers and dealers with car complaints. I answered every customer complaint about a General Motors car the whole time I was on the GM board. This created great trauma inside GM because there was a department that did that. I tried that department, and all they did was send out form letters. I would call people and tell them that I got their letter, listen to their problem, and call the regional office. If I couldn't get a response from the regional office, I would send out an EDS trainee. GM would say, ''What does he know about cars?'' Nothing -- but he knew that his whole life depended on making sure that the customer was treated right, because he had been trained on that since day one.
    We had a crippled state employee in Massachusetts who wrote me the nicest letter and said, ''I can't even get to work.'' I immediately called. He'd already been through the regional office. So I just called the EDS office in Boston. I said, ''Find a hot young trainee and have him call me.'' The kid calls. ''Ross'' -- everybody calls me Ross -- ''what's up?'' I gave him all the details. He says, ''Don't worry. I'll take care of it.'' I didn't tell him how. I called him back in a couple of days. He says, ''It's all taken care of.'' I say, ''Just out of curiosity, what did you do?'' He said, ''Well, the guy is exactly what he said he was in the letter. He's a great guy, not a complainer. His car is a mess. I got the regional guys, and I got the car down there. I showed them the car. I told them, 'Do you want to have this on the front page of the Boston papers? It's just a matter of time, because this is a hell of a story.' I captured their minds and hearts. They're fixing the car. But the poor guy can't get to work while they're fixing it, so I rented him a car from Hertz, with all the special devices he needed.'' I said, ''And you didn't clear that with anybody?'' He says, ''You told me to take care of it, didn't you?'' I say, ''You did exactly what you should have done.'' You wouldn't get anybody inside General Motors to use that kind of personal judgment, because someday the auditors would show up. Dealers started contacting me. I met with the top 20 Cadillac dealers one morning in Dallas. They were as mad as hornets. I said, ''Okay, guys, what are you mad about?'' They just went through the list of everything they thought was wrong. They felt that their dealerships' existence was threatened because their cars were that bad. They said a Cadillac needs to look different from a Chevrolet or it's kind of tough to sell. A Cadillac needs not to come back every few days with a transmission problem, an engine problem. When you step on the accelerator, a Cadillac needs to move. Your trunk needs to be big enough to put a thermos jug in. You don't need oil puddles under any car -- and you damn sure don't need them under a Cadillac. The gaskets are bad. As a result of that meeting, I went out and talked to Cadillac mechanics. I said, ''What's going on with those gaskets? What happens when you fix them?'' They said, ''Well, we put a new gasket in, and they leak again.'' I went to an independent mechanic, a high school graduate, and asked, ''Do you have a lot of General Motors cars coming in here with bad gaskets?'' He says, ''All the time, Ross.'' I said, ''Can you fix them?'' ''Yep.'' I said, ''Do they come back?'' ''Nope.'' I said, ''How do you fix them?'' He winked at me and says, ''Come back here.'' He had all the General Motors gaskets. Then he had a good piece of gasket material, and he would lay the GM gaskets there and draw a picture with a pencil. Then he would take an Xacto knife and cut out a good gasket from the gasket material, and he'd put that on the car. He says, ''They don't ever come back.'' He said, ''Ross, the problem is, some accountant at General Motors is probably saving 3 cents a gasket.'' Somebody probably got a bonus out of that, because 3 cents times millions of gaskets is a big number. I say put the best material in the world on the cars. Mark it up and charge customers a profit for it -- and tell them what you did. People will rush to buy it. When we ended the Cadillac dealers' meeting, I said, ''Okay, guys, I'll take every complaint that you've given me right to the top of General Motors. I'll pursue them. But answer one question for me. Why didn't you just put the list down on the annual surveys about how to improve Cadillac?'' ONE OLD GUY stood up and said, ''Ross, I've been a Cadillac dealer for 35 years, and this is the first time anybody has ever given us an opportunity to tell them what is wrong.'' I said, ''What about the surveys?'' He said, ''There are no surveys.'' I said, ''Gentlemen, I'll change that. I'm going to see that we bring in an outside firm to find out exactly what you are thinking, what your mechanics are thinking, what your customers are thinking, what the people in the Cadillac factory are thinking.'' That survey is a turning point in the history of the Cadillac division. GM is so sensitive and responsive to Cadillac dealers and customers now. You're going to see Cadillac come out with a hell of a car in a relatively short time. General Motors does not understand how to reward people. If I work for you and I feel like you really appreciate what I'm doing, I'm going to be far more effective than if I feel like I'm a commodity you use, as at GM. There will never be a time in EDS when you tell the troops that we're cutting out red meat and dessert and we order champagne for the top officers. Look at what happened when GM slashed the pool of GM-E shares that I was supposed to be able to award EDS managers. Two top managers, who were already rich before the GM merger, refused to accept any shares because they wanted them to go to the younger people who didn't have any. The General Motors guys went crazy. They said, ''It must be nice to be so rich that you thumb your nose at several million dollars' worth of stock.'' I said, ''No, you're missing the point. It goes to the troops. That's what leadership is.'' By contrast, the General Motors guys closed the plants, said no profit sharing, and the next day gave themselves a $1 million bonus. Are they bad? No -- they just don't understand. I'd get rid of the symbolic things that separate people. Symbolism is important. I took the position that anybody who needed a chauffeur to drive him to work was probably too old to be on the payroll, and that anybody in a car company ought to be driving his own car because you didn't get much of a feel in the back seat. We shouldn't be giving handmade cars to executives. We ought to cut out this business that if you're an executive your car comes into the garage every morning and the mechanics take it, and if there's anything wrong with it they fix it. You don't know what reality is. Your car is perfect. I say no. Go to a dealer. Buy a car. Negotiate for it. Have the engine fail. Have the transmission fall out. Have the tailpipe fall off. You should walk around the 25th floor of the General Motors Building in New York. An entire teak forest must have been decimated for that floor -- and this is something they use one afternoon a month. I said, ''Let's get rid of the 25th floor. This is obscene waste. This is a let-them-eat-cake floor.'' They went nuts on me. They said, ''Well, where are we going to meet?'' I said, ''Wherever. In a conference room in the Holiday Inn.'' Of course that was bad. I should have said in the Waldorf-Astoria, in the Pierre. Anywhere is cheaper than keeping that mausoleum. I like Roger Smith. Roger is very bright, very creative. Roger has a thousand ideas a minute. I told General Motors very openly that the only reason I was selling my company to them is that I couldn't think of anything more interesting to do with my life than to work night and day to help revitalize one of the world's great corporations and help it achieve its full potential. I'll work night and day to help them. They grew up inside the system, and things that are killing the company may still look normal to them.
    I was in that system 20 years before Ross got there and I could see it going sideways then.
    Cheers.........R.
    talismandave likes this.

  8. #53
    Tennesseestorm is offline Cadillac Owners Fanatic
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    Re: How GM should have done the 94-96 Fleetwood

    Well I have seen plenty of them with cracked dash pads, same goes for the 91-93 Caprice's, but my old 1991 Caprice had a perfect like new dash.

    Despite these Fleetwod complaints, I love them no matter and would love to have one. You guys are lucky to have one.... just wish I could trade my car for one.... I can trade it for a non-Brougham '94 model, which is fine, despite having higher miles and in not as nice shape as my car, but the guy is wanting some cash in the deal and I just cant spare it now.

  9. #54
    N0DIH's Avatar
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    Re: How GM should have done the 94-96 Fleetwood

    Obviously GM has learned very little over the years haven't they?

    I thought my old company was bad.... They have issues, but not like this. We got this new CEO in, and when he starting getting the projects and things he needed to make decisions on, he CAME DOWN to talk to the Engineering Managers IN PERSON. He didn't send someone, he got up out of his chair and went down the elevator and down the hall and came and sat at the EE managers desks to find out answers to his questions. He made decisions, hard ones, ones that many didn't agree with, BUT HE MADE DECISIONS. Now the company has split off from the rest of the company to form its own, and now has recently been acquired by this giant search engine company who makes operating systems for cell phones.....

    They are turning around, but slowly, but it is happening. I just hope soon enough.

    Now, can GM turn it around? What does it take for them to wake up? Will they EVER wake up? They have the potential to be the best in the world. They SHOULD BE. They aren't.





    Quote Originally Posted by Robin Banx View Post
    The following is the transcript of an interview for business article in Fortune Magazine with Ross Perot in 1988. Ross says it all. It is a rather long post but it is well worth the reading.

    'THE GM SYSTEM IS LIKE A BLANKET OF FOG'

    By Thomas Moore and Ross Perot February 15, 1988

    (FORTUNE Magazine) – In a genial, three-hour interview recently in his Dallas office, Ross Perot spoke expansively to Fortune’s Thomas Moore about how he came to understand the depth of GM's troubles and how he began to formulate his plan for putting them right. Excerpts: We've got to nuke the GM system. We've got to throw away Sloan's book ((My Years With General Motors, former chairman Alfred P. Sloan Jr.'s description of GM's management system)). It's like the Old Testament -- frozen thousands of years ago. We still believe that we can find the right page and paragraph to give us the answer to any question we have today. When you get down to the guys who actually have their hands on things, they know what to do. They can design, engineer, and build the best products in the world. My question is: Why haven't we unleashed their potential? The answer is: the General Motors system. It's like a blanket of fog that keeps these people from doing what they know needs to be done. I come from an environment where, if you see a snake, you kill it. At GM, if you see a snake, the first thing you do is hire a consultant on snakes. Then you get a committee on snakes, and then you discuss it for a couple of years. The most likely course of action is -- nothing. You figure, the snake hasn't bitten anybody yet, so you just let him crawl around on the factory floor. We need to build an environment where the first guy who sees the snake kills it. At Electronic Data Systems employees were trained from the day they joined the company to spend all day serving the customer, getting results, being the best in the world -- not being good bureaucrats. At GM the stress is not on getting results -- on winning -- but on bureaucracy, on conforming to the GM system. You get to the top of General Motors not by doing something, but by not making a mistake. You form groups, hold meetings, get consensuses, don't make decisions. You just kind of let this big old log keep rolling, knowing that sooner or later you're going to retire and get a big retirement anyhow. One day I made a speech to some senior executives. I said, ''Okay, guys, I'm going to give you the whole code on what's wrong. You don't like your customers. You don't like your dealers. You don't like the people who make your cars. You don't like your stockholders. And, to a large extent, you don't like one another. ''For this company to win, we're going to have to love our customers. We're going to have to stop fretting about dealers who make too much money and hope they make $1 billion a year through us. The guys on the factory floor are the salt of the earth -- not mad-dog, rabid, burn-the-plant-down radicals. And all this sniping at one another -- the financial guys vs. the car guys -- is terribly destructive.'' Of course, it was a waste of time to make that statement. I GOT MY FIRST INDICATION that consumers would stop buying many GM cars because of the large number of calls I received from customers and dealers with car complaints. I answered every customer complaint about a General Motors car the whole time I was on the GM board. This created great trauma inside GM because there was a department that did that. I tried that department, and all they did was send out form letters. I would call people and tell them that I got their letter, listen to their problem, and call the regional office. If I couldn't get a response from the regional office, I would send out an EDS trainee. GM would say, ''What does he know about cars?'' Nothing -- but he knew that his whole life depended on making sure that the customer was treated right, because he had been trained on that since day one.
    We had a crippled state employee in Massachusetts who wrote me the nicest letter and said, ''I can't even get to work.'' I immediately called. He'd already been through the regional office. So I just called the EDS office in Boston. I said, ''Find a hot young trainee and have him call me.'' The kid calls. ''Ross'' -- everybody calls me Ross -- ''what's up?'' I gave him all the details. He says, ''Don't worry. I'll take care of it.'' I didn't tell him how. I called him back in a couple of days. He says, ''It's all taken care of.'' I say, ''Just out of curiosity, what did you do?'' He said, ''Well, the guy is exactly what he said he was in the letter. He's a great guy, not a complainer. His car is a mess. I got the regional guys, and I got the car down there. I showed them the car. I told them, 'Do you want to have this on the front page of the Boston papers? It's just a matter of time, because this is a hell of a story.' I captured their minds and hearts. They're fixing the car. But the poor guy can't get to work while they're fixing it, so I rented him a car from Hertz, with all the special devices he needed.'' I said, ''And you didn't clear that with anybody?'' He says, ''You told me to take care of it, didn't you?'' I say, ''You did exactly what you should have done.'' You wouldn't get anybody inside General Motors to use that kind of personal judgment, because someday the auditors would show up. Dealers started contacting me. I met with the top 20 Cadillac dealers one morning in Dallas. They were as mad as hornets. I said, ''Okay, guys, what are you mad about?'' They just went through the list of everything they thought was wrong. They felt that their dealerships' existence was threatened because their cars were that bad. They said a Cadillac needs to look different from a Chevrolet or it's kind of tough to sell. A Cadillac needs not to come back every few days with a transmission problem, an engine problem. When you step on the accelerator, a Cadillac needs to move. Your trunk needs to be big enough to put a thermos jug in. You don't need oil puddles under any car -- and you damn sure don't need them under a Cadillac. The gaskets are bad. As a result of that meeting, I went out and talked to Cadillac mechanics. I said, ''What's going on with those gaskets? What happens when you fix them?'' They said, ''Well, we put a new gasket in, and they leak again.'' I went to an independent mechanic, a high school graduate, and asked, ''Do you have a lot of General Motors cars coming in here with bad gaskets?'' He says, ''All the time, Ross.'' I said, ''Can you fix them?'' ''Yep.'' I said, ''Do they come back?'' ''Nope.'' I said, ''How do you fix them?'' He winked at me and says, ''Come back here.'' He had all the General Motors gaskets. Then he had a good piece of gasket material, and he would lay the GM gaskets there and draw a picture with a pencil. Then he would take an Xacto knife and cut out a good gasket from the gasket material, and he'd put that on the car. He says, ''They don't ever come back.'' He said, ''Ross, the problem is, some accountant at General Motors is probably saving 3 cents a gasket.'' Somebody probably got a bonus out of that, because 3 cents times millions of gaskets is a big number. I say put the best material in the world on the cars. Mark it up and charge customers a profit for it -- and tell them what you did. People will rush to buy it. When we ended the Cadillac dealers' meeting, I said, ''Okay, guys, I'll take every complaint that you've given me right to the top of General Motors. I'll pursue them. But answer one question for me. Why didn't you just put the list down on the annual surveys about how to improve Cadillac?'' ONE OLD GUY stood up and said, ''Ross, I've been a Cadillac dealer for 35 years, and this is the first time anybody has ever given us an opportunity to tell them what is wrong.'' I said, ''What about the surveys?'' He said, ''There are no surveys.'' I said, ''Gentlemen, I'll change that. I'm going to see that we bring in an outside firm to find out exactly what you are thinking, what your mechanics are thinking, what your customers are thinking, what the people in the Cadillac factory are thinking.'' That survey is a turning point in the history of the Cadillac division. GM is so sensitive and responsive to Cadillac dealers and customers now. You're going to see Cadillac come out with a hell of a car in a relatively short time. General Motors does not understand how to reward people. If I work for you and I feel like you really appreciate what I'm doing, I'm going to be far more effective than if I feel like I'm a commodity you use, as at GM. There will never be a time in EDS when you tell the troops that we're cutting out red meat and dessert and we order champagne for the top officers. Look at what happened when GM slashed the pool of GM-E shares that I was supposed to be able to award EDS managers. Two top managers, who were already rich before the GM merger, refused to accept any shares because they wanted them to go to the younger people who didn't have any. The General Motors guys went crazy. They said, ''It must be nice to be so rich that you thumb your nose at several million dollars' worth of stock.'' I said, ''No, you're missing the point. It goes to the troops. That's what leadership is.'' By contrast, the General Motors guys closed the plants, said no profit sharing, and the next day gave themselves a $1 million bonus. Are they bad? No -- they just don't understand. I'd get rid of the symbolic things that separate people. Symbolism is important. I took the position that anybody who needed a chauffeur to drive him to work was probably too old to be on the payroll, and that anybody in a car company ought to be driving his own car because you didn't get much of a feel in the back seat. We shouldn't be giving handmade cars to executives. We ought to cut out this business that if you're an executive your car comes into the garage every morning and the mechanics take it, and if there's anything wrong with it they fix it. You don't know what reality is. Your car is perfect. I say no. Go to a dealer. Buy a car. Negotiate for it. Have the engine fail. Have the transmission fall out. Have the tailpipe fall off. You should walk around the 25th floor of the General Motors Building in New York. An entire teak forest must have been decimated for that floor -- and this is something they use one afternoon a month. I said, ''Let's get rid of the 25th floor. This is obscene waste. This is a let-them-eat-cake floor.'' They went nuts on me. They said, ''Well, where are we going to meet?'' I said, ''Wherever. In a conference room in the Holiday Inn.'' Of course that was bad. I should have said in the Waldorf-Astoria, in the Pierre. Anywhere is cheaper than keeping that mausoleum. I like Roger Smith. Roger is very bright, very creative. Roger has a thousand ideas a minute. I told General Motors very openly that the only reason I was selling my company to them is that I couldn't think of anything more interesting to do with my life than to work night and day to help revitalize one of the world's great corporations and help it achieve its full potential. I'll work night and day to help them. They grew up inside the system, and things that are killing the company may still look normal to them.
    I was in that system 20 years before Ross got there and I could see it going sideways then.
    Cheers.........R.

  10. #55
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    Re: How GM should have done the 94-96 Fleetwood

    Excellent post!!!
    I really liked the gasket bit.
    And how he mentioned the Cadillac should be built the best.
    ie, Strongest tranny, Most reliable engine,and Attention to detail.
    They came close with the 93-96 Fleetwood. The drive train was good. I love the Lt1 mated to the HD 4L60 Transmission, Very Good.
    But....While they did good with the rear end styling...very caddy like.
    I feel the front looks too Chevy like for me. The fenders should have been longer, and not sloped down to the roundy pointy chevy bubble nose.
    This would have allowed for a better front end...with a smaller plastic bumper and a far taller grill. This also could have allowed for a longer and less bubbly hood. Also it would have left room for the core support to go further forward...and made room for big block that could be serviced easily.
    I think in 88,when this guy was writing this,the old Broughams looked uniquely caddy, but the rest wasn't up to par.
    Im sure alot of people would have a hard time telling apart a fwd Deville from an oldsmobile going down the road.
    The Seville's and Eldorado's werent much better.
    And the Cimmaron :::shudder:::
    But these new Caddys, .... Looks like Caddy is trying to copy a damn Nissan or something.
    I once read about how a Cadillac should be about half as nice as a rolls royce, at a quarter of the price.
    I think the old Caddys came close to that mark, but the new stuff not even close.
    Anyhow, hope GM gets it right. I love GM. Well the old GM stuff. Because If I had to buy a new car it would likely be a Lincoln.

  11. #56
    Stingroo's Avatar
    Stingroo is offline Wagon/Audio Enthusiast
    Automobile(s): 92 Caprice Wagon | 01 Sonoma 4cyl 5spd | Past: 94 Fleetwood
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    Re: How GM should have done the 94-96 Fleetwood

    lol WHAT? You think that the current Cadillac lineup looks like something from Nissan? Get your eyes checked, friend. And your love for Lincoln? The Town Car is dead - the rest are blatant rebadges of Ford products for more money. That's probably the worst example of what you "hate" about old GM in the current day and age.

    You're contradicting yourself.

  12. #57
    jayoldschool's Avatar
    jayoldschool is online now GM RWD V8 addict
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    Re: How GM should have done the 94-96 Fleetwood

    Obviously GM has learned very little over the years haven't they?
    I would say that reality is 180 degrees from your statement. They are building the best cars in the company's history. Cadillacs that trounce the German competition. The one-of-a kind Volt. The top selling Camaro. Corvettes that beat Ferrari. Compacts that are as good as anything out there (reviewers words, not mine). I could go on and on.

  13. #58
    gary88's Avatar
    gary88 is offline Cadillac Owners 10000+ Posts
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    Re: How GM should have done the 94-96 Fleetwood

    Not gonna lie, sometimes I've mistaken Altimas for CTSs by looking at the front from a distance.

  14. #59
    Stingroo's Avatar
    Stingroo is offline Wagon/Audio Enthusiast
    Automobile(s): 92 Caprice Wagon | 01 Sonoma 4cyl 5spd | Past: 94 Fleetwood
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    Re: How GM should have done the 94-96 Fleetwood









    I'm just not seeing it.

  15. #60
    orconn's Avatar
    orconn is online now Cadillac Owners 10000+ Posts
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    Re: How GM should have done the 94-96 Fleetwood

    I don't remember who it was at GM that said the car business is a "nickle and dime" business where every nickle save means big profits to the manufacturer. And let's face it Americans have being willing to accept "cheap" flash to be able to afford a car of their dreams. The 1994-96 Fleetwood Brougham is a fine example of this corporate frame of mind, the epitome of the early 1970's Cadillac line ( in my opinion the worst Cadillacs ever built). In order to make "your father's Cadillac" they made sure to put crappy plastic wood instead of even real wood laminated over plastic, they made sure the door panels would flop and clank like Cadillacs of old, and made sure that trim pieces exterior and interior would rattle, or better yet fall off at a after a prescribed two to four years of ownership. To say that Cadillacs improved their assembly and materials quality in the late seventies and actually engineered more "quality" into the cars, and again got on the "quality" band wagon in the '90's and after the turn of the century would be an understatement. This isn't to say that these cars ever came up to higher standards of the high line European or Japanese makes.

    With the 1994-96 Fleetwood Cadillac succeeded in bringing a true nostalgia piece back to the market place just in time to catch a few of the remaining Cadillac buyers from the seventies .... and these cars are a great example of why so many affluent Americans turn to Mercedes, Jaguar and Lexus to fulfill their automotive tastes. Spend some more money and get a car that daily reminds you that you get what you pay for!

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