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Cadillac Tech Tips - How to fix it Discussion, junk yard information. in Item Specific Cadillac Discussion; so this probably doesn't constitute as a tech tip, but i figure the info from my personal experiences should be ...
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    illumina's Avatar
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    Exclamation junk yard information.

    so this probably doesn't constitute as a tech tip, but i figure the info from my personal experiences should be of help.

    the point of this thread is to give my opinion of what parts people should look for in a junk yard as opposed to the parts you are better off buying at a parts store.

    the parts i would advise against going to the bone yard for includes:

    any electrical components such as map sensors, oil pressure swithches, fuel pumps. the list goes on, and i think you get the point here. now one can always argue that you can test the item right there with a ohm-meter, but i prefer these parts to be replaced with brand-new components that have a better than 30 day warranty.

    certain mechanical devices such as water pumps should be avoided from the bone yard. who knows how long the device has been sitting there, wasting away. and especially for the caddy engines, a water pump is something that should be replaced with a new component, not used. even an off-brand cheapie water pump is better than a salvaged pump.

    tires. if you're really in a jam for cash, then a used tire from the junk yard may be needed. otherwise, a good used tire warehouse or a discount new tire place will be the better choice.

    parts that i advise, yet are hit and miss:

    fuel injectors, alternators, starters, ecm's, radiators, shocks, engines, transmissions, power steering pumps, rack-and-pinion steering gears, power accessory devices, drive axles, wheel hub bearings, air-ride suspension motors, distributors, yadda yadda yadda.

    the reason i say hit and miss for the aforementioned items are for this reason:

    you never really know how these items have been treated when last used on the car you are taking them from (in the case of a you-pull-it yard).

    in the case of the alternator, starter, and the radiator, you can take them from the bone yard and have the devices tested at basically any auto parts store and for free too! the radiator though im not too sure about. if any of the devices are defective, the bone yard will usually take them back under warranty and exchange it for something else, or let you pull another peice of if that is what you want. as far a testing the radiator, you can just take it home and run water through it via a hose and see if there are any leaks that surface. make sure there is decent pressure from the hose so that the water pressure will hopefully find a leak before you go any further and waste your time.

    the ecm and the injectors are more of a trial and error thing, as there is no way to really test them other than to try them. you can always check the injectors with the ohm-meter, but that will not be able to detect a severly clogged injector. as far as the ecm goes, i know of no way other than to install it and see how it works out.

    steering gears, steering pumps and the like can usually be visually inspected. if you see any fluids in an area that should not be leaking (hence the entire device), than you're wasting youe money. find another one. with a steering pump, try to spin the pully, if it is loose or makes any small ckicking sounds, than i would look elsewhere. if the steering gear appears loose, if the boots on the device seems worn out, or it is leaking, then you get the point.

    drive axles and wheel hub bearings: again, a good visual inspection will be needed before you waste time on a defective part. in the case of the drive axle, i usually replace the boots on them and put new grease in them. make sure there are no apparent bends/twists/burrs or any thing of the like when inspecting such things. wheel hub bearings are quite simple: if you cannot freely turn the part you have purchased, or if it is too loose and rattles, then it is bad. in all honesty, i would just consider getting a new one, but you can find decent hub bearings in a bone yardif you inspect them well enough.

    shocks and struts are also something to inspect very carefully. i would not recomend purchasing a pair of rusted shocks/struts.

    air-ride suspension motors, power accessory motors: from my experience, these are true hit and miss items. you can test these items (look at your shop manual to see how) before you install or buy them. if they are defective, again, exercise that warranty that the junk yard offers.

    transmissions and distributors: a tranny is something that is a true hit and miss item as well. either they work, or they don't. you can always spend the extra cash by having a bench test done (i think this applies to trannys, never had one tested myself), and in that case, be sure the tester is reputable and well qualified. still, if you purchased a bad tranny, you're out the money it cost to do the test. a distributor is rather easy: if it is cracked and bent. it is no good. when using a salvbaged distributor, i would recomend buy the pick-up coil, hall-effect switch or whatever so you don't have to deal with a possible defective part. i also HIGHY reccomend buying a new dist. gear.

    engines: not a hit and miss item if you rebuilt it. the warranty will usually expire the moment you take the engine apart, but this way, you will have the knowledge of what is needed to get the engine back in running order. now you coulda always just drop the engine in your car as a plug-and-play, but when you start to hear weird noises, don't complain. the warranty will still be valid (in most cases) and you could exchange it...ideally. my advice however: REBUILD IT!!!

    BTW, make sure the engine has no HOLES in it before you buy it or pull it!

    that covers the big stuff...i think.

    things to consider when buying from a junk yard:

    price shop, a good bargain in this case is hard to pass up.

    get warranty information, some salvage yards like to throw the "you're not a professional and you installed it so you're screwed" phrase. get information BEFORE you spend time on a project like this.

    a you-pull-it yard is MUCH cheaper and i highly recomend this type. if you're pressed for time, the price shopping will come in handy and things will still be reasonable.

    inspect, inspect, inspect!!! look the part over and over again. even in a pre-pull parts warehouse, inspect the items you wish to purchase with a mission up your ass! don't get cheesed by not doing so.

    that should cover the basics of bone yard shopping.

    if there is anything anyone would like to add, pleas do so. the more information on personal junk yard experience is a must for everyone who takes this rout in auto part shopping. have fun, illumina

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    Edahall's Avatar
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    Re: junk yard information.

    If I'm buying an engine or transmission, I usually like one out of a wrecked car. Why? Because I know that they had to work before the wreck.

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    Re: junk yard information.

    Quote Originally Posted by Edahall
    If I'm buying an engine or transmission, I usually like one out of a wrecked car. Why? Because I know that they had to work before the wreck.
    I went with that theory with my fuel pump and got burned. I figured it had to be running when the guy hit whatever it was he hit. But no, it was seized. Same can go for an engine or trans. Depends on how long they sit and where they sit. Engine blocks and transmission cases can be damaged by hard hits, too.

    Your best bet, if possible, is to take a good look at what the parts are coming out of. If not, see if the yard is willing to offer a warranty. No warranty, no buy. Even a short warranty is better than none.

    All the electronics in my flood resto '01 are out of a collision totaled '00 DTS. It had no windows and had been sitting in the yard for about a month. All the seats (which had been nice for a 72k mile car) were mildewed and the footwells were full of water. Even though the car was exposed to the elements, all of the electronics - including the instrument panel - function flawlessly. I had to shake the water out of the HVAC controls. A lot of electrical stuff will survive water exposure if it is dried quickly and is NOT powered up when they are exposed. Water conducts electricity and will bake an electronic module if it's still hot. The saving grace on this car was that the power was cut to it at the accident scene so when it was dragged to the salvage yard and got wet everything survived.

    U-pull-it yards are the best because you can gauge how long the car has been there and what kind of trauma it was subjected to.

    It's tough to find late-model parts in the u-pullits but you can find some good earlier stuff. I used to get depressed wandering around the yards and finding cars that people junked that were in better shape than what I was driving. People just get tired of them and have them hauled away.

    Jim

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    illumina's Avatar
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    Re: junk yard information.

    i find the best way to tell if an engine is locked up in a you-pull-it yard is to take a large screwdriver and try and crank the flywheel, while the engine is still in the car.

    if an junk yard engine shows signs of head gasket failure, i will try to take the heads off and see if they are noticeably damaged. it is quite easy if you have a strait-edge and a feeler gauge. if they are still in good order, the engine is mine.

    that said, i still rebuild every engine that comes from the bone yard. i won't even tell you about what happened to my mothers park avenue.

    ok, i will.

    her 86' buick (former). threw a rod on the freeway one day. being that she had no money, i mentioned a junk motor. i also suggested the rebuild. well, she had the cash for the engine, but not the rebuild. so i made sure eveything was as good as it can be, dropped the engine into the car, and voila, it worked...for about two months. odd, considering the warranty was only good for 30 days, as most junk yards carry this warranty.

    BTW, the 3.8 was from a wreaked 88' park ave.

    if you're going for a wreaked car engine, then chances are the bone yard may have tested it to make sure it works. make sure you ask them beforehand.

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    Re: junk yard information.

    My mom's '85 Lincoln was the same way. It was a rebuilt total. During the repairs the engine seized. They freed it up somehow. A few months later a piston came apart and destroyed the motor. Evidently it had cracked in their attempts to free the motor up.

    Motor #2 was a junkyard motor. It ran for about 6 months before it shot a rod through the block.

    Motor #3 was another junkyard motor (low output 302s were plentiful back in the day). This one, however, succumbed to a design flaw in those engines - the plastic teeth on the timing chain sprocket.

    Motor #4 was a guy selling 302s that he had aquired from Ford. They were discarded after they were replaced with engines that had redesigned timing chain sprockets under warranty. It's faster to replace the whole engine than to dig in and replace the sprocket, evidently. He upgraded the sprocket and turned them back out.

    That engine ran until the car was so worn (inside and body) that we junked it.

    Jim

  7. #6
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    Re: junk yard information.

    Another note is to look for common failures and the milage they occur . If you know that 80% of front drive devilles blow there trannys at 130k then treat any junk caddy tranny thats around 130k as a blown tranny....It may have had a reman put in there at 125k but unless that can be verifyed dont waste the money .....

    Probabasly a bad exaple so i use my story .....
    I had an 86 Chrysler Lebaron with the 2.2 turbo ...As some of you know they WILL blow the headgasket around 100k and in turn crack the cylander head . So i went to a u pull before knowing this and snatched a head off a Daytona 2.2 Turbo . Had it fluxed and it was cracked too , in fact every chrysler turbo head i got my hands on was cracked, had to send my barron to the junkyard to be with all the other 100k+ Turbo chryslers as i didnt have the money to buy a new head from chrysler (a 600 dollar "direct connection" head)...A problem i ran into also with the yards is that they dont always know what there doing. I got a head from one and took it home and comapred it to the head that came off the car only to realize the head was off a Non turbo 2.2 , putting that head on the car would have rased the compression ratio to a point i knew it would dentonate (turbo heads had open chambers non turbo had heart chambers)

    So always comapre what came off the car with what is going on it , not only are there diffrences between trim levels and engine options but there are even changes mid year on cars exactly like yours.

  8. #7
    illumina's Avatar
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    Re: junk yard information.

    good point stoney.

    like i said, the junk yard tranny is a true hit and miss item. either they work, or they don't. unlike an engine, you cannot just open an auto transaxle and rebiuld them like you can an engine, unless you know what you're doing.

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    Re: junk yard information.

    Quote Originally Posted by illumina
    so this probably doesn't constitute as a tech tip, but i figure the info from my personal experiences should be of help.

    the point of this thread is to give my opinion of what parts people should look for in a junk yard as opposed to the parts you are better off buying at a parts store.

    the parts i would advise against going to the bone yard for includes:

    any electrical components such as map sensors, oil pressure swithches, fuel pumps. the list goes on, and i think you get the point here. now one can always argue that you can test the item right there with a ohm-meter, but i prefer these parts to be replaced with brand-new components that have a better than 30 day warranty.

    certain mechanical devices such as water pumps should be avoided from the bone yard. who knows how long the device has been sitting there, wasting away. and especially for the caddy engines, a water pump is something that should be replaced with a new component, not used. even an off-brand cheapie water pump is better than a salvaged pump.

    tires. if you're really in a jam for cash, then a used tire from the junk yard may be needed. otherwise, a good used tire warehouse or a discount new tire place will be the better choice.

    parts that i advise, yet are hit and miss:

    fuel injectors, alternators, starters, ecm's, radiators, shocks, engines, transmissions, power steering pumps, rack-and-pinion steering gears, power accessory devices, drive axles, wheel hub bearings, air-ride suspension motors, distributors, yadda yadda yadda.

    the reason i say hit and miss for the aforementioned items are for this reason:

    you never really know how these items have been treated when last used on the car you are taking them from (in the case of a you-pull-it yard).

    in the case of the alternator, starter, and the radiator, you can take them from the bone yard and have the devices tested at basically any auto parts store and for free too! the radiator though im not too sure about. if any of the devices are defective, the bone yard will usually take them back under warranty and exchange it for something else, or let you pull another peice of if that is what you want. as far a testing the radiator, you can just take it home and run water through it via a hose and see if there are any leaks that surface. make sure there is decent pressure from the hose so that the water pressure will hopefully find a leak before you go any further and waste your time.

    the ecm and the injectors are more of a trial and error thing, as there is no way to really test them other than to try them. you can always check the injectors with the ohm-meter, but that will not be able to detect a severly clogged injector. as far as the ecm goes, i know of no way other than to install it and see how it works out.

    steering gears, steering pumps and the like can usually be visually inspected. if you see any fluids in an area that should not be leaking (hence the entire device), than you're wasting youe money. find another one. with a steering pump, try to spin the pully, if it is loose or makes any small ckicking sounds, than i would look elsewhere. if the steering gear appears loose, if the boots on the device seems worn out, or it is leaking, then you get the point.

    drive axles and wheel hub bearings: again, a good visual inspection will be needed before you waste time on a defective part. in the case of the drive axle, i usually replace the boots on them and put new grease in them. make sure there are no apparent bends/twists/burrs or any thing of the like when inspecting such things. wheel hub bearings are quite simple: if you cannot freely turn the part you have purchased, or if it is too loose and rattles, then it is bad. in all honesty, i would just consider getting a new one, but you can find decent hub bearings in a bone yardif you inspect them well enough.

    shocks and struts are also something to inspect very carefully. i would not recomend purchasing a pair of rusted shocks/struts.

    air-ride suspension motors, power accessory motors: from my experience, these are true hit and miss items. you can test these items (look at your shop manual to see how) before you install or buy them. if they are defective, again, exercise that warranty that the junk yard offers.

    transmissions and distributors: a tranny is something that is a true hit and miss item as well. either they work, or they don't. you can always spend the extra cash by having a bench test done (i think this applies to trannys, never had one tested myself), and in that case, be sure the tester is reputable and well qualified. still, if you purchased a bad tranny, you're out the money it cost to do the test. a distributor is rather easy: if it is cracked and bent. it is no good. when using a salvbaged distributor, i would recomend buy the pick-up coil, hall-effect switch or whatever so you don't have to deal with a possible defective part. i also HIGHY reccomend buying a new dist. gear.

    engines: not a hit and miss item if you rebuilt it. the warranty will usually expire the moment you take the engine apart, but this way, you will have the knowledge of what is needed to get the engine back in running order. now you coulda always just drop the engine in your car as a plug-and-play, but when you start to hear weird noises, don't complain. the warranty will still be valid (in most cases) and you could exchange it...ideally. my advice however: REBUILD IT!!!

    BTW, make sure the engine has no HOLES in it before you buy it or pull it!

    that covers the big stuff...i think.

    things to consider when buying from a junk yard:

    price shop, a good bargain in this case is hard to pass up.

    get warranty information, some salvage yards like to throw the "you're not a professional and you installed it so you're screwed" phrase. get information BEFORE you spend time on a project like this.

    a you-pull-it yard is MUCH cheaper and i highly recomend this type. if you're pressed for time, the price shopping will come in handy and things will still be reasonable.

    inspect, inspect, inspect!!! look the part over and over again. even in a pre-pull parts warehouse, inspect the items you wish to purchase with a mission up your ass! don't get cheesed by not doing so.

    that should cover the basics of bone yard shopping.

    if there is anything anyone would like to add, pleas do so. the more information on personal junk yard experience is a must for everyone who takes this rout in auto part shopping. have fun, illumina
    Great thread. I am surprised at the number of people who put total trust into junkyards. Then in 3 months, when they have to replace that rust filled radiator that sat in the bone yard full of coolant for two years, they go back and start the process all over again (okay...I admit it, that was actually me who did that!). :drinker I've had some good, mostly bad experiences with them. But your advice is right on the money. Knowledge and common sense will help you steer clear of the bad junk yards, and help you find the ones who take customer service seriously, as well as knowing what parts to buy or not buy. If this thread can just keep just one person from getting ripped off, then...

  10. #9
    illumina's Avatar
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    Re: junk yard information.

    Quote Originally Posted by klebrun
    Great thread. I am surprised at the number of people who put total trust into junkyards. Then in 3 months, when they have to replace that rust filled radiator that sat in the bone yard full of coolant for two years, they go back and start the process all over again (okay...I admit it, that was actually me who did that!). :drinker I've had some good, mostly bad experiences with them. But your advice is right on the money. Knowledge and common sense will help you steer clear of the bad junk yards, and help you find the ones who take customer service seriously, as well as knowing what parts to buy or not buy. If this thread can just keep just one person from getting ripped off, then...
    yeah, you're right about the radiators. you really have to scope them out and flush them...hopefully without damaging the internals of the radiator.

    personally, i prefer new units as opposed to used, but the price for a junk yard radiator ranges from $20 to $60. a new cadillac radiator will go around $300. but again, the warranty on a new unit will far surpass any on the of used radiator, and they should not be hit and miss like a used unit.

    usually, if you're looking into a used radiator, you should look at the junk yards that specialize in them i.e.: some bone yards around where i live actually do, and they will usually carry a longer warranty as opposed to the average salvage yard.

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    Re: junk yard information.

    Talking about electronics, I bought the PCM from totaled car and it works pretty fine. That car was in an acident. I payed just $50 +$15 shipping cost.
    But I never gonna buy electronics from flooded car. Yes, you can dry it. But a water has a salt, dirt and who knows what else. After time small conductors on a plate will have corrosion. But the worst thing is that problems with electronics moduls really hard to find and diagnose. If the PCM will start mulfunction, believe me you'll change it last.
    Other example about tires.
    It happeneds I damaged a side of a tire while parking. It wasn't reparable. Other three tires weren't new but still can get another 20K. What the choice? To buy all four new tires? To buy just one new tire? I bought a tire exact like others, just may be a bit better on a junk yard for $40 with balancing and installing. Still have these tires.

  12. #11
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    Re: junk yard information.

    Quote Originally Posted by Edahall
    If I'm buying an engine or transmission, I usually like one out of a wrecked car. Why? Because I know that they had to work before the wreck.
    ...or as in the case of how I aquired the 472 for my 1979 Deville, look for a rusted frame that is the reason the car is in the yard!
    When my Dad and I pulled the 472 out of a '72 Fleetwood, we couldn't figure out why such a nice car with 92k miles was in the junkard, until I found a rusted through frame near the wheel well.

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    Re: junk yard information.

    where i buy engines,they let you run the engine to see if you want it, they don't sell parts off the cars till the engine has been sold

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    Re: junk yard information.

    It's funny about trannies and how everyone is afraid of them.. if you can rebuild an engine, you can DEFINITLY rebuild a tranny. and yes, I'm talking about automatics. With the exception of the valve body, think of the tranny pieces as a stack of parts. the ONLY thing you need ot do is take them out and lay them out in the order they need ot go in. Everything is in a sub-assembly. so just rebuild one part at a time. Take it apart on a dirty bench and put it back together in a "clean room". that's all. 90% of the tranny parts can be washed in the dishwasher. trans fluid is more mineral oil based than petro oil. Your dishwasher won't know the difference between tranny fluid and cooking grease. except for the obvious odor. The valve body is pretty easy as well.. just do it in order. take it apart somewhere that you can lay all the pieces out and know where they go. better yet, lay them out and take a picture. cause you will want to put the valves, etc in the dishwasher too. Wash the valvebody in solvent and then the dishwasher. reassemble using clean tranny fluid or vasoline to hold in things like checkballs, etc.. For those worried about check ball placement, it's almost always very apparent where they need to go. It's really no more difficult to build a tranny than it is an engine.

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    Re: junk yard information.

    Good thread, I too have been to salvage yard a number of times for both of the Eldos. The most recent was for a sunroof motor + control module. I replaced mine, and the problem was still there, I finally tore the whole track out to find a piece of wood had thrown the two sides of the tracks off, breaking the alignment, preventing them from ever syncing again. It was good to know because having the dealer/shop replace the motor + module which was their initial diagnosis was between 750-1000 for parts and labor for just those two parts! I paid a whopping $60 and 3 hours of my time led me to the correct diagnosis. I still have to get a track and that wrecking yard doesn't like to give up glass because the interrior salvage can be significant

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    fullserviceman is offline Cadillac Owners Fanatic
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    Re: junk yard information.

    Im finding that here in upstate NY there isnt alot of older cars (pre 1994) around. However Im not sure about you all but the attitude of junkyards around here is enough to make me pay double for new!! The nicer ones say yup we got it as in fuel tank or radiator. You get there and it looks to have been sitting in a lake for 10 years....

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