In Praise of Local Mechanics
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Cadillac SRX Second Generation Forum - 2010+ Discussion, In Praise of Local Mechanics in Cadillac SRX Forums; Just my personal experience and opinion. If you're driving an SRX you may not be rich, but you're obviously doing ...
  1. #1
    retcad is offline Cadillac Owners Fanatic
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    In Praise of Local Mechanics

    Just my personal experience and opinion.

    If you're driving an SRX you may not be rich, but you're obviously doing OK. Financially, better than many.

    And I'm fine as well, thank you.

    Hopefully, most of you have a local ASE Certified mechanic that knows you and your Caddy. If you don't, GET one.

    Someone you trust and close to home.


    I cringe when I read posts that start "....so I took it to the dealer and..."


    If it is not a WARRANTY issue, avoid dealerships!


    I know they give you free coffee and call you Mr. or Ms.


    I have friends that work at dealerships. Their objective is SALES and PROFIT.


    Take the time to patronize your local mechanic who knows you, your Caddy, and treats you like a human.


    I speak from experience.

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  3. #2
    adamjeeps is online now Cadillac Owners Enthusiast
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    I think we pretty much all have experienced, either first or second hand, nightmares at dealer service departments. Unfortunately, these forums make up such a tiny percentage of vehicle owners that have any interest at all in their vehicles. Most people don't give a thought to their cars until it fails to get them from point a to point b. Then they assume the dealer is the best place to go to get it fixed because they must be "smarter" than Bobs Garage.



    Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App

  4. #3
    300:29:1 is offline Cadillac Owners Enthusiast
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    Quote Originally Posted by adamjeeps
    I think we pretty much all have experienced, either first or second hand, nightmares at dealer service departments. Unfortunately, these forums make up such a tiny percentage of vehicle owners that have any interest at all in their vehicles. Most people don't give a thought to their cars until it fails to get them from point a to point b. Then they assume the dealer is the best place to go to get it fixed because they must be "smarter" than Bobs Garage. Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
    The dealer visit means no conflict with warranty. A good example is disconnecting and reconnecting the battery. A while back I remember a post about the OnStar Module not working after this, and a dealer required part (fuse?) to reneable it. Today's modern vehicles often, but not always, are best serviced by the dealer. When you choose otherwise there is some degree of risk. There are some independent shops that are very capable, but it can be tricky.
    allgm likes this.

  5. #4
    Huey Driver is offline Cadillac Owners Fanatic
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    Re: In Praise of Local Mechanics

    I agree, to an extent, that patronizing local business is good. Problem is, most dealers are locally owned as well. Certainly, they employ members of the community.
    As was mentioned above, a lot of the time, local shops cant deal with the higher tech issues that come up on todays cars. Many years ago (probably 15 or so) I went to a local shop with an ECM issue. They said there was nothing they could do, and that it didnt even make economic sense for them to pay for the diagnostic equipment. They would update software after 3-4 years, but any sooner than that, they wouldnt get the business to justify it.
    Part of the reason the dealer charges what they do is because they have to buy (or lease or whatever) all that diagnostic stuff to deal with the latest issues. They also have access to all the latest information and databases. Sure, they have overhead to pay for that fancy waiting room.
    Retcad's recommendations are good, but I would say that one of the best parts of his advice is having confidence in your shop. I probably know more than the average person about my car. I check the tire pressure nearly every day, if nothing else than glancing at the DIC for the TPMS info. At this point, I feel most confident in my dealer to be able to deal with the issues that come up, warranty or not.
    I mean, if warranty was expired and I need a new battery, alternator, etc, I would certainly deal with an independent shop (in reality, I would do it myself). But anything with ignition, fuel system, etc, that stuff just isnt your ordinary work...
    RippyPartsDept and crump13 like this.

  6. #5
    georule is offline Cadillac Owners Fanatic
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    Re: In Praise of Local Mechanics

    As long as I'm under warranty, I'll be going to a dealer for service. Luckily, I do have a choice of several Caddy dealers in reasonable range if the closest one disappoints me (which hasn't happened yet).

  7. #6
    '12CTSman is offline Cadillac Owners Fanatic
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    Re: In Praise of Local Mechanics

    In my 45 years of vehicle ownership I can attest the dealership is always the best place to have anything but routine maintenance done to your vehicle. The techs at the dealership have the training and tools to do the job right even if it takes them several attempts. Also, if I tech has a problem s/he can talk to another tech at the dealership, or talk/chat with a brand service center versus the independent mechanic who usually only has a collection of old and greasy Helm's manuals to go to.

  8. #7
    300:29:1 is offline Cadillac Owners Enthusiast
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    Quote Originally Posted by Huey Driver
    I agree, to an extent, that patronizing local business is good. Problem is, most dealers are locally owned as well. Certainly, they employ members of the community. As was mentioned above, a lot of the time, local shops cant deal with the higher tech issues that come up on todays cars. Many years ago (probably 15 or so) I went to a local shop with an ECM issue. They said there was nothing they could do, and that it didnt even make economic sense for them to pay for the diagnostic equipment. They would update software after 3-4 years, but any sooner than that, they wouldnt get the business to justify it. Part of the reason the dealer charges what they do is because they have to buy (or lease or whatever) all that diagnostic stuff to deal with the latest issues. They also have access to all the latest information and databases. Sure, they have overhead to pay for that fancy waiting room. Retcad's recommendations are good, but I would say that one of the best parts of his advice is having confidence in your shop. I probably know more than the average person about my car. I check the tire pressure nearly every day, if nothing else than glancing at the DIC for the TPMS info. At this point, I feel most confident in my dealer to be able to deal with the issues that come up, warranty or not. I mean, if warranty was expired and I need a new battery, alternator, etc, I would certainly deal with an independent shop (in reality, I would do it myself). But anything with ignition, fuel system, etc, that stuff just isnt your ordinary work...
    I thought I was the only one who checked the DIC TPMS all the time. LOL
    allgm likes this.

  9. #8
    georule is offline Cadillac Owners Fanatic
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    Re: In Praise of Local Mechanics

    Quote Originally Posted by 300:29:1 View Post
    I thought I was the only one who checked the DIC TPMS all the time. LOL
    Me three, particularly this time of year. It's edging towards wanting me to put some more air in (31lbs cold) because of the cold.

  10. #9
    300:29:1 is offline Cadillac Owners Enthusiast
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    Quote Originally Posted by georule
    Me three, particularly this time of year. It's edging towards wanting me to put some more air in (31lbs cold) because of the cold.
    Indeed. I just added air again due to cold temps. Doing my wife and daughter's car also. Colder temps mean adding and/or checking the air pressure in you tires.

  11. #10
    retcad is offline Cadillac Owners Fanatic
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    Re: In Praise of Local Mechanics

    The manual says to check pressure 'cold', but makes no definition of that term, other than the car sitting there for at least three hours or driving less than a mile or so.

    This morning (19 degrees F.), the DIC showed 32 on some tires and 31 on the others. After a few miles, they were up to 34/33. I'm hesitant to overinflate them on a frigid morning
    and risk a blowout on the highway or a very hard ride otherwise.

    I realize that under-inflated tires are not good, and check them frequently.

  12. #11
    300:29:1 is offline Cadillac Owners Enthusiast
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    Re: In Praise of Local Mechanics

    Quote Originally Posted by retcad View Post
    The manual says to check pressure 'cold', but makes no definition of that term, other than the car sitting there for at least three hours or driving less than a mile or so.

    This morning (19 degrees F.), the DIC showed 32 on some tires and 31 on the others. After a few miles, they were up to 34/33. I'm hesitant to overinflate them on a frigid morning
    and risk a blowout on the highway or a very hard ride otherwise.

    I realize that under-inflated tires are not good, and check them frequently.
    You are supposed to check them cold. That is correct. A temp drop of about about 10 degrees means a drop of about 1 PSI. I had to add twice recently to compensate for cold temps. You should go by the cold reading, sitting for 3 hours or more, and if adding when they're not cold just put in 3 lbs extra. Check them again when cold and adjust as needed. The values will rise to near 40 when driving in my experience, as they get hot. This is not a big concern as long as you check the cold reading and it is correct. 35 all around is recommended by GM. I hope this helps.

  13. #12
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    crump13 is online now Cadillac Owners Fanatic
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    Re: In Praise of Local Mechanics

    Quote Originally Posted by 300:29:1 View Post
    You are supposed to check them cold. That is correct. A temp drop of about about 10 degrees means a drop of about 1 PSI. I had to add twice recently to compensate for cold temps. You should go by the cold reading, sitting for 3 hours or more, and if adding when they're not cold just put in 3 lbs extra. Check them again when cold and adjust as needed. The values will rise to near 40 when driving in my experience, as they get hot. This is not a big concern as long as you check the cold reading and it is correct. 35 all around is recommended by GM. I hope this helps.
    So when GM for this example states the recommened PSI is 35, they are referring to cold temps, correct? Is the max PSI rating from the manufacturer (typically around 40 - 45) a cold temp PSI?

    I am just trying to make sure I am doing it right since I typically check my tires cold and keep the PSI closer to the max PSI. I haven't messed with my Cadillac as of yet since it is so new and there hasn't been a need as of yet but this is what I did with my previous vehicles and what I do with my motorcycle. So by filling it cold up to or close to the max PSI, am I essentially over inflating them as I drive and they get hot? I had always thought the manufacturer's max PSI was a cold rating and I can go all the way up to that PSI cold with no issue. I had also thought that the car companies always under inflated tires to give you a smoother ride.

    ~Tina~

  14. #13
    300:29:1 is offline Cadillac Owners Enthusiast
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    Re: In Praise of Local Mechanics

    Quote Originally Posted by crump13 View Post
    So when GM for this example states the recommened PSI is 35, they are referring to cold temps, correct? Is the max PSI rating from the manufacturer (typically around 40 - 45) a cold temp PSI?

    I am just trying to make sure I am doing it right since I typically check my tires cold and keep the PSI closer to the max PSI. I haven't messed with my Cadillac as of yet since it is so new and there hasn't been a need as of yet but this is what I did with my previous vehicles and what I do with my motorcycle. So by filling it cold up to or close to the max PSI, am I essentially over inflating them as I drive and they get hot? I had always thought the manufacturer's max PSI was a cold rating and I can go all the way up to that PSI cold with no issue. I had also thought that the car companies always under inflated tires to give you a smoother ride.

    ~Tina~
    The max PSI is just that. You really should go by the sticker on the door jamb and use cold readings. Sometimes I'll add a few lbs extra as I'd rather be higher than lower, but I try to stay within 2-3 lbs above the recommended values at most. Some will add a few extra lbs for a firmer ride, but that's personal preference. I had a bad experience with under inflation many years ago that led to premature wear and early replacement of a set of tires. Having the TPMS in the DIC is very helpful for me. I have found it to be very accurate, but of course a gauge on the valve stem is the best way to check. Today, for example, I went for a short drive. Leaving my unheated but attached garage, the outside temp display took a few minutes to drop and level off. Similarly the TPMS values went down a little after a few minutes. They stayed right around 37-38 PSI, but I'm ok with being 2-3 lbs over. I also check the values using the Remote Link App.

  15. #14
    adamjeeps is online now Cadillac Owners Enthusiast
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    Re: In Praise of Local Mechanics

    Inflate the tires to the recommended psi per the sticker on the door jamb. The manual says to inflate to 38 psi cold if you are going to be driving at or over 100 mph. The recommended cold value takes into consideration the heat build up when driving. You are over-thinking this! A higher inflated tire will actually produce less heat than under-inflated, but that is a different topic altogether

  16. #15
    georule is offline Cadillac Owners Fanatic
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    Re: In Praise of Local Mechanics

    In theory you get a little bit better gas mileage moderately over-inflated and a little bit better traction moderately under-inflated. And uneven wear in both cases.

    But "moderately" would be the key word there. When my tire guy put the winter tires on they were at 34psi cold, but the temps have dropped 30 degrees since then and now they are about 3lbs lower. . . so I'll probably put some more air in (to mix with the pure nitrogen the tire place put in) soonish since the weather doesn't seem to be changing any time soon.

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