Are the 4.9L's good over 140,000 miles - Page 3
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Cadillac Seville / Cadillac Eldorado Forum Discussion, Are the 4.9L's good over 140,000 miles in Past Cadillac Vehicle Discussion; Originally posted by Ralph Has anyone ever heard of an engine in a Caddy being wrecked because of the wrong ...
  1. #31
    Katshot's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Ralph
    Has anyone ever heard of an engine in a Caddy being wrecked because of the wrong fuel? Also, I think they offer extended warrenties just because they can make more money charging extra for them.
    Hell yeah, severe detonation can destroy an engine.

  2. #32
    kcnewell is offline Cadillac Owners Connoisseur
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    Also yes to your second point......One of the primary reasons for being in business is to make money! They might have a different system in Canada, But here that's how we do it!

  3. #33
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    Originally posted by kcnewell
    Also yes to your second point......One of the primary reasons for being in business is to make money! They might have a different system in Canada, But here that's how we do it!
    Same as here, Bud.

  4. #34
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    Originally posted by Katshot
    Hell yeah, severe detonation can destroy an engine.
    I'm just curious if you have ever personally seen this destruction because when I was at the Caddy dealership for my infamous radio, the mechanic laughed at that question. I don't think they wanted to admit that lower octane could ever ruin a Caddy motor!

  5. #35
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    Absolutely.
    I've seen pistons with holes, and cracks. Severely scored cylinder walls. Destroyed spark plugs. Yeah, detonation can do some serious engine damage.

  6. #36
    kcnewell is offline Cadillac Owners Connoisseur
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    You're infamous radio mechanic sounds like an idiot! There might be a correlation between his inherant inability to fix your radio and his apparent lack of knowledge about detonation and its related effects....New mechanic time? I see that he's a dealership mechanic. That might explain why he.....

    A. Hasn't got a clue

    B. Is lying to you

    C. Is brainwashed by his employer into truly thinking that
    there's no problem with detonation so as to tell unsuspecting
    car owners that it's ok to run cheap gas!

    D. All of the above

    I suspect....D!

  7. #37
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    Originally posted by kcnewell
    You're infamous radio mechanic sounds like an idiot! There might be a correlation between his inherant inability to fix your radio and his apparent lack of knowledge about detonation and its related effects....New mechanic time? I see that he's a dealership mechanic. That might explain why he.....

    A. Hasn't got a clue

    B. Is lying to you

    C. Is brainwashed by his employer into truly thinking that
    there's no problem with detonation so as to tell unsuspecting
    car owners that it's ok to run cheap gas!

    D. All of the above

    I suspect....D!
    Good point. Ever notice how the dealer mechanics (up here anyway) each have only one or two specific jobs they can do. For example there is a radio/electronics guy, a transmission guy, an engine guy, etc. Much like doctors who now specialize in many specific areas, it is a bit silly, all this specialization. Back in the 70's a mechanic had to do it all, he had to know all the systems on the car.

  8. #38
    timber6860 is offline Cadillac Owners Member
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    I have a story about the 4.9, last year in July on a 110 degree day my radiator cooling fans failed, (car had 130k) and the car overheated on the way back from San Diego. Turns out I blew a hole in the radiator. I was about 30 miles from home, so I loosened up the cap, and limped it home. After replacing the fans, I apparently did not tighten the bottom radiator hose, and it blew on my way to work a few days later, temp was probably around 100 degrees at 9am, (I live 40 miles sw of Phoenix) and I couldn't safely pull over for about 2 miles. I lost every drop of coolant. After pulling over, and getting a ride to Pep Boys, I put the hose back on (tightly) and let the engine cool for about 1.5 hours, filled it up with fresh coolant and H2O, and started her up away I went. Almost a year later, and the car still runs great with 145k. (I change oil every 2.5k with Mobil 1) My Seville (4.5) has 185k and still runs very well. IMO those are great engines, although the NS is much more fun...

    I had a similar overheating type of situation about 10 years ago with a Chrysler convertible, and the head gasket blew.

  9. #39
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    Not that I don't believe you but if your story is true, it would be a one in a million deal.

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    kcnewell is offline Cadillac Owners Connoisseur
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    It would be amazing.....Considering that, As good as the 4.9 is the quickest way to kill one is to let it get HOT! That is the enemy of all of the Caddy aluminum engines.

  11. #41
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    Originally posted by Ralph
    Good point. Ever notice how the dealer mechanics (up here anyway) each have only one or two specific jobs they can do. For example there is a radio/electronics guy, a transmission guy, an engine guy, etc. Much like doctors who now specialize in many specific areas, it is a bit silly, all this specialization. Back in the 70's a mechanic had to do it all, he had to know all the systems on the car.
    Ralph,
    That just shows how little you know about today's automobiles. Comparing cars of the 70's to today is like comparing the Wright brothers to NASA. That's why you don't see a lot of old mechanics that can still work on their own cars. And if they do, it's usually limited to "basic" tasks. The OEM has made it VERY plain that they want as much repair work as possible to come back to them and one way they have helped that happen is by making the cars and trucks they build as technologically advanced as possible, and as dependant on "specialized" tools, equipment, and repair techniques as possible.
    Having automotive technicians become "specialized" is a necessity for all but the top guys because the systems in these cars now are so complicated.
    In some ways, a top mechanic has to have even MORE training than a doctor. Face it, the human body hasn't changed much in the last million years but the automotive technology field is in a CONSTANT state of change.

  12. #42
    ckucia is offline Cadillac Owners Fanatic
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    I'll have to dig up the threads. Over on the Allante board, we had a discussion with a GM Powertrain guy regarding the 4.x engines. One thing that came through quite clearly is that cooling system maintenance is imperative - both regular drain and fills, and adding the GM supplements.

    Regarding long-term expectancy, the rings will apparently be shot by around 200k miles. The good news is the engine is relatively easy to rebuild - new rings, bearings, gaskets and away you go. No machining required other than a light valve-lapping. Cylinder liners should not need boring or honing, valvetrain is essentially bulletproof.

    I just acquired a 1991 4.5 (essentially a shorter-stroke 4.9). I'm in the process of tearing it down, even though its supposedly a 40k mile engine. It's full of coolant sludge from sitting, but the internals are in great condition. I'm using it as a preventative replacement for my '89 4.5 with over 150k miles. The Northstar deserves the credit it gets, but the 4.x engines were amazing in their own right. There's something to be said for the proven simplicity of a low-RPM pushrod engine.

  13. #43
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    Originally posted by Katshot
    Ralph,
    That just shows how little you know about today's automobiles. Comparing cars of the 70's to today is like comparing the Wright brothers to NASA. That's why you don't see a lot of old mechanics that can still work on their own cars. And if they do, it's usually limited to "basic" tasks. The OEM has made it VERY plain that they want as much repair work as possible to come back to them and one way they have helped that happen is by making the cars and trucks they build as technologically advanced as possible, and as dependant on "specialized" tools, equipment, and repair techniques as possible.
    Having automotive technicians become "specialized" is a necessity for all but the top guys because the systems in these cars now are so complicated.
    In some ways, a top mechanic has to have even MORE training than a doctor. Face it, the human body hasn't changed much in the last million years but the automotive technology field is in a CONSTANT state of change.
    I absolutely agree, I do not know much about the computer systems of today. I guess I long for the old days again. I know they make it complicated so that only the dealer has the proper tools to properly diagnosis a problem. I see less and less of the independant garages now a days. (probably cannot afford the computers to monitor the systems) That's why I need your comments Kat!

  14. #44
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    I wasn't just referring to the use of computers Ralph. They do add a lot of extra complexity to the vehicles but I was also pointing to the "mechanical" complexity which includes not only the pieces and parts but materials and finishes that are used in building these vehicles.
    You'd be amazed at what goes into building our cars these days.
    Mountains of technology seperate today's cars from those of only a couple decades ago. And that technology must be understood by today's automotive technicians if they are to be successfull. The average vehicle owner/operator has no clue how complicated the vehicle he or she drives truely is, and to be honest, they don't care either. Unfortunately, that translates into a lack of understanding as to what it takes to repair these vehicles. The days of the dumb grease monkey are all but gone. Today's trained and certified auto mechanics are true "technicians" and really deserve more respect than they generally recieve.

  15. #45
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    ...Regarding long-term expectancy, the rings will apparently be shot by around 200k miles...

    My 4,5 in 90 Eldo has 220 800 miles on odometer - engine runs great, no leaks, no oil consumption, no smoke - everything is OK - do i need still start thinking about rings change

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