: Forget Mufflers, try this.



ShadowLvr400
02-09-07, 11:25 PM
http://www.clearimageautomotive.com/Twin%20Turbo%20Impala%20SS%20Kit.htm

That will boost some horsepower. :)

dretwenty5
02-09-07, 11:49 PM
I gotta get me one of those, hope thy get it workin

ShadowLvr400
02-10-07, 09:27 AM
It's been working on a bunch of other vehicles. It'll just take a little R&D for a package.

Barrister_07101
02-10-07, 10:27 AM
I have never seen rear turbo's before. Seeing the breathing element under the car for the first time is way strange.

LAC-MAN
02-10-07, 10:50 AM
It Is A Good Idea, But What About The Heat Generated By The Turbo. Its Awful Close To The Fuel Tank!!

Hammondsix
02-10-07, 11:52 AM
Ummm...

1. You're supposed to put the Turbos NEAR the intake.
2. I dont know how good it is to place the Turbos near the wheels with splashing water and all that jazz. Imagine going through a slightly deep puddle in this thing.


This guy doesnt know what he's doing!

mortis08
02-10-07, 01:44 PM
These are for real!!! :yup: :yup: They already have kits for camaro and corvette and other popular applications. I guess they must work pretty well, but I have always heard that u need the turbo as close as possible to the intake. Seems like with this setup it would have lots of turbo lag. And I dont really like the idea of having my open element air cleaner UNDER the car (for lots of obvious reasons).:wacky:

N0DIH
02-10-07, 07:27 PM
I have talked with them on it, they claim despite the difference, it does not have problems at all with turbo lag.

I am still a fan of putting turbos as close to the throttle body as possible.

Old Fleetwood
02-10-07, 09:34 PM
Hammond6's mention of the deep puddle reminded me of the time I was driving from Milwaukee to Indy and got detoured off the highway in Indiana, late at night on to a conventional roadway right after a heavy rain.
Coming off an overpass on an asphalt road, (nice and shiny black) I hit a long, foot deep puddle at about 70 mph that lifted my Mercedes completely off the road for about 50 feet in about 1/2 a second.
By the grace of God, the Mercedes kept going straight and landed on the far side of that puddle, dip or whatever the hell it was, but I can imagine what might have happened to those turbos - and maybe the motor - if they had been UNDER the car.

DaveSmed
02-10-07, 09:39 PM
Remote mount turbos are old news.... they work pretty well. The magic is in the sizing. As far as lag, think about some of those quite sizable front mount intercoolers many people are fond of.... Thats a decent amount of volume, likely more than the tube running to the back of the car.

Fair amount of benifets and drawbacks like with any turbo setup. Heard the drainbacks need careful attention on these though.

Neat idea!

ShadowLvr400
02-11-07, 11:23 AM
The other big comment on turbo lag is 2 things to remember. 1) These turbos are small, which means quick spool. 2) There's a V8 in front of it.
On the chances of damaging the turbos, they're built to be under the car, and if you're truly scared, get a skid plate stuck in there. The distance from the intake results in some pressure loss, that's why classic mantra is keep the turbo near the intake. But the 1-2 drop in psi, is countered by the cooling that the extra piping brings. It's essentially an intercooler for free.
On the intake under the car and puddles, I'll admit, I don't know. It's worked on some other cars, and they've probably got something planned out for that. Additionally, the power of the engine itself is enough to drive the car through the rain. If you're on the throttle enough to be engaging the turbos at full boost in the rain, you have bettwer tires than I do.

N0DIH
02-11-07, 02:47 PM
And here, I have plenty of snow that I drag the mufflers through and plenty of salt and Potassium Chloride that we dump on the roads too. None to good for a turbo....

90Brougham350
02-11-07, 03:10 PM
The other big comment on turbo lag is 2 things to remember. 1) These turbos are small, which means quick spool. 2) There's a V8 in front of it.
On the chances of damaging the turbos, they're built to be under the car, and if you're truly scared, get a skid plate stuck in there. The distance from the intake results in some pressure loss, that's why classic mantra is keep the turbo near the intake. But the 1-2 drop in psi, is countered by the cooling that the extra piping brings. It's essentially an intercooler for free.
On the intake under the car and puddles, I'll admit, I don't know. It's worked on some other cars, and they've probably got something planned out for that. Additionally, the power of the engine itself is enough to drive the car through the rain. If you're on the throttle enough to be engaging the turbos at full boost in the rain, you have bettwer tires than I do.

Shadow's right on. There's a loss of roughly 1 psi. However, the temperature of the air charge is about 100 degrees less than underhood-mounted turbors, so you actually come out ahead. The turbos are far enough away from the gas tank so as not to cause problems. But your stock exhaust is about the same distance away and that never causes problems. Even while sitting in traffic the turbos will not cause any harm to the gas tank. While moving, the air under the vehicle moves the heat away from the turbos so quickly it's a non-issue.

These turbos aren't exactly meant to go on vehicles that see salt in the winter time. If you're worried about water under the vehicle, run some extra pipe and install the air filter higher up on the vehicle.

dkozloski
02-11-07, 04:09 PM
Issues that concern me include that the bearings and seals of the turbo are oil cooled. Getting the oil up hill back to the engine is going to require a scavange pump. If oil is pooled in the turbo as it cools down it is rapidly going to coke up. This whole device is in the category of "just barely works better than nothing". Energy contained in exhaust gases is in the forms of heat, pressure, and velocity. All of these rapidly decrease as soon as the exhaust leaves the engine. There is nothing about this installation that wouldn't be improved if you moved the turbo to where it was directly on the engine. This thing works but is in the barely works category.

N0DIH
02-11-07, 06:14 PM
I honestly never had coking problems on my 301 Turbo, but I was always changing the oil too (spec'd 30W over 30F, 10W30 below, not NOT above 30F), a lot. But the bearings did take a hit, the 301 Turbo despite its rep, made 290 rwhp on my ride. And best guess is 400+ lb/ft torque, to the ground. The rod bearings were pretty abused looking.

For a while I was changing the oil weekly, but only because I got it free (side bene of working at an oil change shop), and the engine was SPOTLESS inside.

90Brougham350
02-11-07, 06:43 PM
I don't understand why everyone is so skeptical of rear-mounted turbos. STS builds fantastic setups for quite a few different vehicles, and they work phenominally. Don't believe me? Horsepower TV did an STS-turbo install on an '05 Vette. You should see that thing move! Mounting the turbos in the rear is a fantastic idea if you don't have salt or snow to worry about. The heat savings alone are worth the install. You know what's crazy? Putting something that adds more heat under the hood.

Here, read this, this answers every one of the questions and concerns people have been raising about this setup.

http://www.ststurbo.com/f_a_q

N0DIH
02-12-07, 12:39 AM
My 301 Turbo had a heat shield on the turbo side of the hood, it needed it. Yes, very hot.

I was thinking on mine a large (I have a 465 CID diesel turbo downstairs) single turbo and go that route.

ShadowLvr400
02-13-07, 12:45 PM
On the oil flow, there's a small scavenge pump included in the kits as I recall. For salted areas, I think you could use high temp enamel or something to help protect everything. Heheh, or Rhino Lining. :)

N0DIH
02-13-07, 01:43 PM
Oil flow to the turbo is key to life. I guess you can easily make shields for the turbos, or even skid plates. You'll need heat shields to protect the underside of the car too, else it will be baking the interior. That plus some good paints or coatings should do pretty well.