: Traction control ?



King3244
01-29-07, 02:09 PM
Why do these vehicles have a button to elimate traction control?

Everytime you restart it goes back into traction control and I would think that this is a good thing.

I am under the impression that it is automatic and therefore not working unless it is needed........therefore there should be no difference to mileage.

Comments.

TSS
01-29-07, 02:36 PM
If stuck in deep sand, snow or mud, you need a way to turn it off.

c5 rv
01-29-07, 07:14 PM
Try turning onto a busy paved road from gravel and have traction control cut power while a semi approaches rapidly from behind.

robhersch
01-29-07, 09:21 PM
One reason for "traction control off": In California, all vehicles must pass State smog inspections (after being exempt for the first 4 years) in order to be licensed for highway use; part of these every-2-year tests require the vehicle to be operated at idle as well as "moving" at ~15 MPH & ~25 MPH on a single axis "dyno"; traction control must be "off" in order to allow the "moving" test while connected to a stationary testing station which records Speed, RPM, CO2%, O2%, HC(ppm), CO%, NO(ppm). Typically traction control - when on - will not allow the wheels of the driving axel to move with the wheels of the non-driving axel stopped. Try it sometime.

john d
01-30-07, 12:21 AM
One reason for "traction control off": In California, all vehicles must pass State smog inspections (after being exempt for the first 4 years) in order to be licensed for highway use; part of these every-2-year tests require the vehicle to be operated at idle as well as "moving" at ~15 MPH & ~25 MPH on a single axis "dyno"; traction control must be "off" in order to allow the "moving" test while connected to a stationary testing station which records Speed, RPM, CO2%, O2%, HC(ppm), CO%, NO(ppm). Typically traction control - when on - will not allow the wheels of the driving axel to move with the wheels of the non-driving axel stopped. Try it sometime.
AND....I've heard that AWD gets one set of wheels loaded on the "dyno" and the other set jacked off the floor. Must have traction control turned off on that set-up.

r_casino
01-30-07, 05:37 AM
One reason for "traction control off": In California, all vehicles must pass State smog inspections (after being exempt for the first 4 years) in order to be licensed for highway use; part of these every-2-year tests require the vehicle to be operated at idle as well as "moving" at ~15 MPH & ~25 MPH on a single axis "dyno"; traction control must be "off" in order to allow the "moving" test while connected to a stationary testing station which records Speed, RPM, CO2%, O2%, HC(ppm), CO%, NO(ppm). Typically traction control - when on - will not allow the wheels of the driving axel to move with the wheels of the non-driving axel stopped. Try it sometime.

That might be "doable", but I'm betting that CA rules have nothing to do with Cadillac putting a "TC off" button in the car. I think it has more to do with getting out of loose spots as TSS mentioned.

Plus, there is a sticker under the hood on AWD vehicles that says something along the lines of not testing the vehicle with 2-wheels on a dynanometer. CA must have an alternative test for AWD vehicles??

n7don_srx
01-30-07, 06:28 AM
My '98 Pont. Montana had a TC off button. If one wheel were on a low traction surface and the other on a higher traction surface, TC could prevent the vehicle from moving if the low traction side were to spin. With TC off you could "ease" into the throttle and have a better chance of moving.

King3244
01-30-07, 01:20 PM
Wait just a darn minute..........turn traction control off? to get out of deep snow or sand?????

Isn't this defeating the whole purpose of traction control?

And why would traction control affect your power and pickup to get out of the way of that semi?

I must be missing something here or my thoughts on traction control are seriously flawed.

Help!

donjumpsuit
01-30-07, 02:01 PM
how the heck are you supposed to do burn-outs without a TC-off button!

Also, some users are very put off by the way traction control cuts off power when it is engaged. You and I know this is for maximum safety, and maximum tractions, but some drivers would rather spin the wheels a little bit, and keep the rpms at the maximum.

FarEast
01-30-07, 03:19 PM
Wait just a darn minute..........turn traction control off? to get out of deep snow or sand?????

Isn't this defeating the whole purpose of traction control?

And why would traction control affect your power and pickup to get out of the way of that semi?

I must be missing something here or my thoughts on traction control are seriously flawed.

Help!

Because traction control works great when you are already moving and starting to lose traction. Like going too fast on a slippery road. Cutting off power and applying breaks on some of the wheels would be a good thing that keeps you going the way you wanna go. If you are not moving like in case of being stuck in a snow drift traction control would not allow wheels to spin freely and prevent you from getting out of a snow. This all applies mostly to AWD SRXes. If you got rear wheel drive and your rear tires stuck in some deep doo-doo you're going to need a tow traction control or not.

donjumpsuit
02-02-07, 05:32 PM
DEFINITIVE ANSWER

Prius owners can't even drive in the snow!

http://www.consumeraffairs.com/news04/2007/01/prius_snowbound.html

TSS
02-02-07, 09:49 PM
That is exactly why we have a traction control off button .

r_casino
02-03-07, 08:07 AM
From the SRX owners manual:

"You should turn the system off if your vehicle ever gets stuck in sand, mud or snow and rocking the vehicle is required."

That Toyota story is an example of why we (and most vehicles with TC) have the TC off button. There are cases where TC being "off" would actually enable the vehicle to move, while TC being "on" would not.